burke510: November 2011 Archives

Among many revolutionary psychological ideas, Sigmund Freud introduced the idea od the Id, Superego and Ego. The Id is the basic instincts, or what people inherently want to do. This is driven by sex and aggression. The Superego is the morals which keep the Id in check. Finally, the Ego is in charge of everything, personality, decision making and interacting with the real world.

What interests me is the extent to which this idea is modeled in popular culture. Many movies or works of art portray the idea of a person dealing with a a tiny devil on one shoulder and an angel on the other while trying to make a difficult decision.
This idea has been portrayed in many movies and tv shows, including the Simpsons multiple times as a reoccurring theme. In a recent Dexter episode, Dexter battles with inner voices attempting to decide between releasing his raw desire to kill, vs. his desire to not get caught and do things correctly. My personal favorite example is from a Seinfeld episode in which Jerry is very repulsed by a girl mentally, but loves the sex. The episode portrays Jerry's brain playing chess with his penis to determine what the outcome of his relationship will be.

(skip to 3:08 for the chess game)
http://youtu.be/buCEzjBz8Hg

In this scene, Jerry's penis represents the Id, while the brain represents the Superego.

Freud's idea of the Id, Ego and Superego are so represented in popular culture because of the comedic potential of this idea. People find it very humorous to imagine a battle going on inside their minds. Perhaps people like to imagine that there really is a voice inside that tells them to do the instinct, even if it is wrong. They like the idea that a part of them really wants to what is considered wrong. People also want to imagine that there exists a voice that knows what to do. If there are voices telling people what to do, they can better trust that the right decision will be made in the end.

While reading chapter 10, the section that particularly interested me was the section on infant development and the Mozart effect. While the book focuses on musical stimulation after birth, my experience comes from "Prenatal Learning with Music." While my parents were pregnant with my older brother, they occasionally attempted to stimulate him with Mozart and other classical works. Remember, this is all before birth. Three years later, when they were pregnant with me, they were already parents dealing with another child and had much busier lives. They did not find time to make me subject to forced stimulation while I was in the womb. Now advance 18 years and compare my brother and I. We are almost exactly the same in terms of test scores, work ethic, and drive for success. There is no gaping discrepancy between my brother and I proving that stimulation while in the womb significantly affected his development. The only difference between him and I, he may be a much more creative individual than I am considering he will soon be an architect and I will be an accountant.
Admittedly, I cannot completely disprove that music while in the womb is a pointless practice because of this tiny sample size with no control and hardly a well set up research study, but from my personal experience, I do not see much of an effect.

While researching more background on the Idea of prenatal music development I came across babyzone.com, a typical website for excited parents. The page they have dedicated to Prenatal learning with music is pretty wimpy when it comes to psychological evidence which makes me question the validity of this phenomenon.

http://www.babyzone.com/pregnancy/article/prenatal-learning-with-music

This website doesn't really directly quote research studies or provide concrete evidence for this phenomenon. They even mention that findings vary in their results which prove issues with replicability. The only thing that has consistently been proved is that babies react to auditory stimuli while in the womb, but this has no proven effect on the cognitive and psychological development of a child.

While reading chapter 10, the section that particularly interested me was the section on infant development and the Mozart effect. While the book focuses on musical stimulation after birth, my experience comes from "Prenatal Learning with Music." While my parents were pregnant with my older brother, they occasionally attempted to stimulate him with Mozart and other classical works. Remember, this is all before birth. Three years later, when they were pregnant with me, they were already parents dealing with another child and had much busier lives. They did not find time to make me subject to forced stimulation while I was in the womb. Now advance 18 years and compare my brother and I. We are almost exactly the same in terms of test scores, work ethic, and drive for success. There is no gaping discrepancy between my brother and I proving that stimulation while in the womb significantly affected his development. The only difference between him and I, he may be a much more creative individual than I am considering he will soon be an architect and I will be an accountant.
Admittedly, I cannot completely disprove that music while in the womb is a pointless practice because of this tiny sample size with no control and hardly a well set up research study, but from my personal experience, I do not see much of an effect.

While researching more background on the Idea of prenatal music development I came across babyzone.com, a typical website for excited parents. The page they have dedicated to Prenatal learning with music is pretty wimpy when it comes to psychological evidence which makes me question the validity of this phenomenon.

http://www.babyzone.com/pregnancy/article/prenatal-learning-with-music

This website doesn't really directly quote research studies or provide concrete evidence for this phenomenon. They even mention that findings vary in their results which prove issues with replicability. The only thing that has consistently been proved is that babies react to auditory stimuli while in the womb, but this has no proven effect on the cognitive and psychological development of a child.

While reading chapter 10, the section that particularly interested me was the section on infant development and the Mozart effect. While the book focuses on musical stimulation after birth, my experience comes from "Prenatal Learning with Music." While my parents were pregnant with my older brother, they occasionally attempted to stimulate him with Mozart and other classical works. Remember, this is all before birth. Three years later, when they were pregnant with me, they were already parents dealing with another child and had much busier lives. They did not find time to make me subject to forced stimulation while I was in the womb. Now advance 18 years and compare my brother and I. We are almost exactly the same in terms of test scores, work ethic, and drive for success. There is no gaping discrepancy between my brother and I proving that stimulation while in the womb significantly affected his development. The only difference between him and I, he may be a much more creative individual than I am considering he will soon be an architect and I will be an accountant.
Admittedly, I cannot completely disprove that music while in the womb is a pointless practice because of this tiny sample size with no control and hardly a well set up research study, but from my personal experience, I do not see much of an effect.

While researching more background on the Idea of prenatal music development I came across babyzone.com, a typical website for excited parents. The page they have dedicated to Prenatal learning with music is pretty wimpy when it comes to psychological evidence which makes me question the validity of this phenomenon.

http://www.babyzone.com/pregnancy/article/prenatal-learning-with-music

This website doesn't really directly quote research studies or provide concrete evidence for this phenomenon. They even mention that findings vary in their results which prove issues with replicability. The only thing that has consistently been proved is that babies react to auditory stimuli while in the womb, but this has no proven effect on the cognitive and psychological development of a child.

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