kehne004: October 2011 Archives

Learning is the change in an organism's behavior or thought as a result of experience). Classical conditioning is a form of learning in which an organism comes to associate stimuli. There are four components of classical conditioning:
a) Unconditioned Stimulus: Stimulus that generates an automatic response
b) Unconditioned Response: Automatic response to a non- neutral stimulus.
c) Conditioned stimulus: Neutral stimulus that generates a learned response through repeated pairing of stimuli.
d) Conditioned Response: Learned response which was previously associated with the non-neutral stimulus.
In the case of Pavlov's dogs, the unconditioned stimulus was the meat powder, which stimulated the unconditioned response, salivation. The metronome, the conditioned stimulus, could generate a conditioned response, salivation, after being paired repeatedly with the unconditioned stimulus, meat. (Lilienfeld, 202).

Watch: http://vimeo.com/5371237

Classical conditioning can be applied to the video found on the link above. The unconditioned stimulus (the non-neutral stimulus) is Jim asking Dwight if he wants a mint. The unconditioned response (the automatic response) is Dwight reaching out to get the mint. The conditioned stimulus (the neutral stimulus) is the beep on the computer which Jim paired repeatedly with asking Dwight if he wanted a mint. Finally (the conditioned response) the learned response, is Dwight reaching out for a mint after hearing the beep on the computer.

Learning is the change in an organism's behavior or thought as a result of experience). Classical conditioning is a form of learning in which an organism comes to associate stimuli. There are four components of classical conditioning:
a) Unconditioned Stimulus: Stimulus that generates an automatic response
b) Unconditioned Response: Automatic response to a non- neutral stimulus.
c) Conditioned stimulus: Neutral stimulus that generates a learned response through repeated pairing of stimuli.
d) Conditioned Response: Learned response which was previously associated with the non-neutral stimulus.
In the case of Pavlov's dogs, the unconditioned stimulus was the meat powder, which stimulated the unconditioned response, salivation. The metronome, the conditioned stimulus, could generate a conditioned response, salivation, after being paired repeatedly with the unconditioned stimulus, meat. (Lilienfeld, 202).

Watch: http://vimeo.com/5371237

Classical conditioning can be applied to the video found on the link above. The unconditioned stimulus (the non-neutral stimulus) is Jim asking Dwight if he wants a mint. The unconditioned response (the automatic response) is Dwight reaching out to get the mint. The conditioned stimulus (the neutral stimulus) is the beep on the computer which Jim paired repeatedly with asking Dwight if he wanted a mint. Finally (the conditioned response) the learned response, is Dwight reaching out for a mint after hearing the beep on the computer.

Lilienfeld gave us a lot of good information about marijuana on pages 193-194, but after reading this section I asked myself "How exactly does marijuana work?" I turned to the Internet, and this is what I found.
Most of us are aware that the main chemical found in marijuana that affects users is called THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol). THC mimics the effects of anandamide, a neurotransmitter found naturally in our brains, by binding to the cannabinoid receptors. Cannabinoid receptors are vast in the hippocampus, cerebellum, basal ganglia, and the hypothalamus. As we have learned in previous chapters the hippocampus is responsible for memory, the cerebellum is responsible for balance control and coordinated movements, the basal ganglia is responsible for movement control, and the hypothalamus is responsible for motivation, emotion, and hunger regulation. Within seconds of inhaling THC, it has reached the brain and begins to attack these areas. This is why users have a hard time remembering things, controlling their emotions, and controlling their appetite.

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