schle346: October 2011 Archives

Memory and Amnesia

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Our textbook defines memory as our ability to retain information over time. Some of us have very good memories and can remember tons of the tiniest details. On the other hand, some of us have terrible memories. At any moment you can have your memory seriously damaged by being in an severe accident that can damage your brain and memory.

Amnesia is one of many conditions that could arise from such trauma to the brain. There are two types of amnesia, retrograde and anterograde (Psychology; From Inquiry to Understanding). Retro grade amnesia is where we lose memories from our past. Anterograde is where we lose the ability to form new memories. As stated in our textbook, one myth of amnesia is that most people with amnesia suffer from retrograde amnesia but, in reality, anterograde amnesia is much more common. Also, I believe it to be more difficult to deal with than retrograde amnesia. With that being said how does this type of amnesia affect the people with it and their family and friends?

I thought of this question when I was watching an episode of Private Practice last week. A couple came in for an appointment. As it turned out, the wife is pregnant AND she has anterograde amnesia. She can't form any new memories. She is always surprised by the fact that she is pregnant. Long story short, her husband finds this condition emotionally draining on himself and decides to leave her after they have the baby. He figures that she won't remember anything anyways.

This is just one example of the effects of amnesia on people. Is it morally right? Maybe not. But, regardless stories like this always leave me thinking...what would you do if someone you loved had anterograde amnesia? How would you deal with it?

Sleep Apnea

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According to our textbook, Psychology: From Inquiry to Understanding, Sleep Apnea is a serious sleep disorder that affects roughly 2-20% of the general population. It is caused by a blockage of the airway during sleep resulting in fatigue, weight gain, night sweats, and irregular heart beat. Of course this is only some of the affects of sleep apnea and there are many more short and long term effects.

What I am most interested in is what are the most popular and/or effective treatments for sleep apnea? Again, according to the textbook, most doctors recommend weight loss because this disorder is associated with being overweight. But, also mentioned in the book is the use of the CPAP machine. CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure. I was curious as to how it worked so I found a simple video on sleep apnea and how CPAP works:
http://youtu.be/6QcmK24ZNyQ

Still curious as to what treatment was better, I found an article from the American Sleep Association on CPAP and other sleep apnea treatments. They stated that the CPAP machine is the more popular treatment and potentially the most effective. Weight loss, as pointed out by the ASA, is still a very viable treatment, but it is a very slow process. So, most patients who are trying to lose weight are also put on CPAP to help open up their airways right away.

So I guess, in a way, I've answered my question. CPAP is the more popular and effective treatment for sleep apnea if it's essentially being used not matter what.

article from the American Sleep Association: http://www.sleepassociation.org/index.php?p=whatiscpap

Correlation Studies

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We have talked some about correlational studies. Correlational studies are designs meant to examine the extent to which two variables are related. There are three types of correlation; negative, positive, and zero correlation. Negative is when one variable goes up the other goes down or in the opposite direction. Positive is when both variables go in the same direction. A zero correlation means that neither of the variables are related. I believe this is very important in psychology because psychologists do numerous studies and it is important to be able to find out whether two variables are correlated or not.
In psychology we can't always be sure that two variables are correlated. Of course there are studies, like the one we did in class, where we graphed the correlation of quiz scores to exam scores. If you think about it, those two variables make sense. In most cases the higher the quiz scores the higher the exam score. But, sometimes there are outrageous correlations that don't make any sense. For example, eye color and math exam score. There would most likely be a zero correlation and those two things are pretty ridiculous to correlate in the first place. Sometimes there are studies that you just can't tell and that is when the research and experiments can help to support your claim.
Here is an article about an interesting correlation study I found:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/21/divorce-causes-hair-loss-_n_974544.html

Correlational Studies

user-pic
Vote 0 Votes

We have talked some about correlational studies. Correlational studies are designs meant to examine the extent to which two variables are related. There are three types of correlation; negative, positive, and zero correlation. Negative is when one variable goes up the other goes down or in the opposite direction. Positive is when both variables go in the same direction. A zero correlation means that neither of the variables are related. I believe this is very important in psychology because psychologists do numerous studies and it is important to be able to find out whether two variables are correlated or not.
In psychology we can't always be sure that two variables are correlated. Of course there are studies, like the one we did in class, where we graphed the correlation of quiz scores to exam scores. If you think about it, those two variables make sense. In most cases the higher the quiz scores the higher the exam score. But, sometimes there are outrageous correlations that don't make any sense. For example, eye color and math exam score. There would most likely be a zero correlation and those two things are pretty ridiculous to correlate in the first place. Sometimes there are studies that you just can't tell and that is when the research and experiments can help to support your claim.
Here is an article about an interesting correlation study I found:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/21/divorce-causes-hair-loss-_n_974544.html

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This page is an archive of recent entries written by schle346 in October 2011.

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