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Enthusiastic Writing

When I compare reading Thoreau and Annie Dillard, one large difference is very obvious and very important. Both writers are experiencing the exact same situation, that is, exploring and appreciating the wilderness by themselves, but the way that they describe there experience is completely opposite. Both books provide philosophical views on nature and our relationship with it, but Thoreau writes in a rather dry and slow-paced manner while Dillard writes in a more upbeat and lively fashion that really grabs the attention of the reader. I really enjoyed reading Dillard much more than Thoreau simply because of the writing style that she employs. She gives everything life and really expresses what nature is to her while added in philosophical ideas for the reader to ponder while Thoreau focuses largely on the mind and the state of mind that nature can put one in and focuses secondarily on what that nature actually is. The reader gets the sense that Dillard has come to the woods because she genuinely enjoys it while in Walden it seems more that Thoreau has retreated to the woods mainly to get away from the village. Certainly Dillard is a much more contemporary author and so it is easier for me to relate to her, but I just love the passion that she writes with. She doesn’t hold everything in nature up on a pedestal. She yells at steer and tries to scare frogs, but all the while she is still in awe of everything. She offers an idea to people to take or leave and merely suggests that we take more time to notice nature and understand it. She doesn’t force us into anything, but her writing persuaded me so effectively. She makes nature sound like the most exciting thing ever and I’m sure this reading would appeal much more to the average person than Thoreau’s would.

http://hubcap.clemson.edu/~sparks/dillard/bio.htm
This gives you an idea of the kind of person that she is and her writing style.

Comments

This quote makes me a better person, Thoreau leads...

“Men go back to the mountains, as they go back to sailing ships at sea,
because in the mountains and on the sea they must face up.?

-Thoreau