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January 30, 2008

Joseph's Altered Childhood Image

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Images appropriated by Joseph C. Berns and altered in Adobe Photoshop CS3.

Mike B

baBY MIkEy.jpg

androids_and_robots@hotmail.com

Joseph Berns

smteepee.gif

Childhood Photo

somer055@umn.edu

littleandrew.jpg

January 28, 2008

Michael E. B.

blom0124@umn.edu
Babypic.jpg

January 26, 2008

Paradise and Purgatory

Exhibition: Paradise and Purgatory
Artist: Hieronymous Bosch
Title: "The Garden of Earthly Delights"
Medium: Oil on Wood Panel
Year: c. 1504

This triptych by Bosch is infamous. As biblically creepy as it is perversely beautiful, the consequence of sin has never looked so fascinatingly futuristic and...creepy. I've seen this work many times before, and its always the same response: revulsion mixed with wonder. The skill and vision required to create this biblical journey from Adam and Eve to hellish hellfire is truly ASTOUNDING. What a mammoth effort, and what a powerful, powerful work this is. It is obviously a moral work, one designed to incite fear rather than admiration, but the grotesque third panel, damnation in all its hideousness, is worth the soul-scolding. I mean, what the...? Of course Bosch's grasp of the human form is not exactly on point, i.e. a little stiff/formal, but it is century-specific, representing that particular period. Final verdict: This is one powerful piece.

Chambers

Exhibition: Chambers Gallery
Artist: James Lecce
Title: "Slow Drip Slither (Red)"
Medium: Acrylic Polymer Emulsion on Panel
Year: 2005

This lava-lamp-smashed-against-the-kitchen-wall-where- the heck-is-my-dinner abstract work by Lecce engages me in ways I never expected. It caught my eye the moment I walked through the door. In the short description attributed to his painting he claims he wants his work to give us pleasure, that "abstract work has the power to strir up a lot of emotions." And he accomplishes just that. This work is excitingly powerful - I couldn't look away! You seem to get lost in the loomingly large, glossy RED rectangular panel full of swirling cherry-reds, greys and whites splattered in circling cones and lumpy stripes. It seems to run roughshod over an entire wall. It is hypnotic and hefty, a great abstract effort.

Botanical Art of a Different Kind

Exhibition: Botanical Art of a Different Kind (Plant Pathology Library Exhibit)
Artist: Kent Loeffler
Title: "Rust Fungus"
Medium: Photography
Year: 2008

This unique photograph of rust fungus, aka Puccina angelicaeedulis, is a remarkable specimen that phographs not like something we'd find on the bottom of our shoe after a Sunday stroll through the park, but more like the stained glass monuments to the Almighty found in Gothic cathedrals. Forest greens and smoky rust-reds permeate throughout each of the two layers captured; a composite piece with each of its Photoshopped layers overlapping to create a veiny, webbed effect that is truly startling. Light and dark play a tremendous role as well, for certain areas of the fungus have been lighted or "transilluminated" with just the right effect of diffused light and subtle patches of dark. Texturally it is spongy, crunchy. Loeffler has actually made fungus BEAUTIFUL and MAGICAL to look at. A tremendous feat, and one I applaud him for.

January 25, 2008

Pinkville

In the nash gallery there is an exhibit called "world if the tongvil" by sheila pinkville. I was amazed at how all of the different pictures came together to make a natural looking landscape connecting all different parts of the world. Each picture seemed to be so different from the others yet when they all were put together, the piece took shape as one solid landscape. The effort and time put into that project is remarkable and it shows in the overall quality of the image.

Pinkville

In the nash gallery there is an exhibit called "world if the tongvil" by sheila pinkville. I was amazed at how all of the different pictures came together to make a natural looking landscape connecting all different parts of the world. Each picture seemed to be so different from the others yet when they all were put together, the piece took shape as one solid landscape. The effort and time put into that project is remarkable and it shows in the overall quality of the image.

Chambers...Again

I really enjoyed "The City" by ezra wilson. I thought the way the art surrounded the skyline made the city seem like it's encompassed within the art, not the other way around. The idea that the art sort if defines a city is intriguing to me and the color and haze surrounding the skyline added to it as well.

Unpainted Sculpture

The piece at the Walker Art Center that I saw and remember always loving is "Unpainted Sculpture" by Charles Ray. I've never been into modern art all that much but seeing a life size car being molded and put on display like that is astonishing. The thought that it's not finished yet by calling it "unpainted" is ironic to me considering the actual condition of the car itself. The detail that went into this can make me appreciate how much work the artist put into it.

January 23, 2008

MFA Exhibition-Scrapes

Artist: Caroline Kent
Title: The City Wall From Inside Me
Medium: Mixed Media
Year: 2008

This sculpture, or mixed media work, is a brilliant homage to the 80's kind of angst to be found in galleries all over Soho courtesy of Basquiat or even Haring in their heyday. I really was impressed by this piece because of (1) the enormity of its scope (2), the strategically-placed graffiti scrawls and color shocks out of the precious 80's color palette like peach and baby blue, and finally, for its irregular-shaped and sawed-off form, a kind of embryo in its mutated stage. Really, Kent has created something sublime here, a kind of hodge-podge of swirling, muted and incomprehensible emotion, played out in symbols, flakes and splattered paint. There were many impressive works in this exhibit; I was really amazed at the quality and the thoughtfulness evoked in each effort. Kent's piece was effectively striking and a little bit unnerving at the same time. My favorite kind of art!

Remotely Yours Movie- Self-Identity








Joseph B.

Young'n

albre126@umn.edu

ahh!

"Ahh!..."

give me a hug - blog.jpg

"Brotherly Love"

Molly I.

ingem012@umn.edu
blog#1.jpg

Alyssa Hoerl

Hoerl002@umn.edu
Baby picture12.jpg

January 22, 2008

Kai T.

tana0061@umn.edu
Kai_little.jpg

Anna S.

sche0671@umn.edu
Untitled-1.psd

Brenna M.

malan041@umn.edu
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Dustin L.

ludwi105@umn.edu

Childhood photo.jpg

Craig K.

korp0034@umn.edu
Little Craig.jpg

Dan

juol0003@umn.edu
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Mio I.

ishid005@umn.edu

Joseph H.

hinzx029@umn.edu
img002.jpg

Benjamin F.

flat0105@umn.edu
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Elizabeth C.

croni007@umn.edu
cronin.jpg

January 17, 2008

instructor cheryl wilgren clyne

cheryl wilgren clyne
clyne003@umn.edu

artist statement and resume
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/clyne003/resume//
thesis exhibition
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/clyne003/mfathesis//

January 16, 2008

Cloud Gate

Anish Kapoor
“Cloud Gate?

This sculpture is really a sight to seem I’ve been to Chicago before but I don’t remember ever seeing this sculpture, and I’m pretty sure I would remember it I had, this sculpture is called the cloud gate but most people refer to it as the bean because… well it looks like a bean but is about 10 feet tall and 15 feet long, and the outer surface is completely coated with reflective metal. As a whole, this sculpture essentially turns the entire city of Chicago into a landscape portrait. It amplifies the magnitude of the city in comparison to yourself when you get up close. You can also walk underneath the sculpture which actually made me dizzy because the walls reflect off one another. I really felt like the bean was an interactive piece of artwork, which is probably why it is one of the city’s prize landmarks.

This is a make up for the Seaworthy exhibit

Untitled

Dustin Nelson
“Untitled?

The works of Dustin’s that were displayed for the BFA really drew my attention because they were really impressive pieces of artwork that also had symbolic messages. The one I chose displays a sorcerer over a crystal ball holding his magic wand. Pictured within the crystal ball is the nation of Pakistan, and to the left of the ball is a hat with stars and stripes which if the sorcerer replaced with his cap would make him resemble Uncle Sam. Uncle Sam has his wand cast over the crystal ball as if to cast a spell over Pakistan (presumably to solve the crisis in the cashmere region?) but only a melodramatic fizzle of smoke emanates from his wand. To me this picture overall symbolizes the inability of the US to solve crises in the middle east even if we do think we are magical.

January 15, 2008

Artist I Admire

Artist: Tamara De Lempicka

Growing up a Polish debutante, De Lempicka lived a privileged and sheltered life. She and her family escaped Poland during the Russian Revolution and eventually settled in Paris, where De Lempicka's interest in art, beginning with the Dadaists and Surrealists, took shape. Eventually De Lempicka became known and celebrated for her portraiture, in the school or style that was known as "synthetic cubism." She was the master of this genre. Her subjects, mostly socialites and aristocrats, have a soft, fluid geometry to their forms, and you can actually see how De Lempicka used shapes like cones and cubes to construct and execute her paintings. With the use of flattering, vibrant colors her sitters were always depicted with style and grace, but always with their true character showing through, whether it was just a hint of a snarl or an arrogant smile. De Lempicka was a notorious party-goer, and one of the queens of the art deco society. Unfortunately, De Lempicka's brilliant streak as a celebrity portraitist ended, and she resigned herself in her later years to doing palette-knife impressionist paintings (which failed miserably). I still think she was a brilliant artist, however - a perfect example of the tough, independent glamorous painter.


BFA Exhibit 2 (replacing Quarter Gallery scholarship show)

Artist: Krista MCuellar
Title: Static Movement I
Medium: Cast Bronze
Year: 2007

Henry Moore seems to have a lot of devotees at this University because I found, once again, a stellar work which typifies his style and whimsy. But this piece has something different and exciting to add to the bag as well: movement. I really love this piece, with its legs and torso seemingly caught in mid-air, headless, but curiously better for it. The left leg extends forward, while the right is cranked to bend as though its ready to take flight. The bronze used is dirty, even rustic looking, with just the right amount of weathering and texture, both in the round hole of the center as well over the of the piece at large. The overall shape is smooth and fluid, again, suggesting movement while stuck in time. A really outstanding piece by a very gifted sculptor.

BFA Exhibit

Artist: Lauren Haberly
Title: Julia
Medium: Etching
Year: 2008

I was drawn to this etching by student Lauren Haberly because of the strangely exotic and globby rendering of the main figure, Julia. The folds of her body, shown from a side view through the open door of the bathroom, seem to jiggle and shake even in repose, and yet Julia seems to survey herself admirably, even longingly. The etching is of very high quality, with smooth hatching and concise outline, and I really liked the artist's use of dark and light, especially the backdrop of the checkerboard tile of the bathroom. The position of the open door in the foreground leads us directly to Julia, setting up the frame of the figure as a powerful focal point. A really impressive piece, the artist seems to have a real gift as an engraver.

January 13, 2008

Autobiographical Image

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January 11, 2008

What is ARTS 1601

ARTS 1601 is an introductory course in the T and I or New and Combined Media area of the Department of Art at the University of Minnesota, taught by Cheryl Wilgren Clyne.

January 9, 2008

River to Infinity - The Vanishing Points

Exhibition: River to Infinity - The Vanishing Points; Minneapolis Institute of Arts
Artist: Andreà Stanislav
Medium: Mixed Media
Year: 2008

WOWZERS. Mirroring ourselves, our perception of the modern world and the natural environment we so eagerly manipulate, Stanislav has created an interactive circus of the cultural hoaxes, the real distasters and the subtle beauty to be found in the world, and our precarious place in it. This truly was an amazing spectacle, a once-in-a-lifetime experience that I will never forget. Videos of looming explosions invade the senses and throw one off-kilter, mirrored rivers reflect and reanimate our perception of space and time, crystallized, bejewled headless horses with feathery tails stand at attention - all of it was so overwhelemingly specatcular my head was swimming, spinning while I tried to take it all in. A fascinating work that I can only add effectively seemed to shock and delight participants. Obviously Stanislav did her job.

The Search to See: Photographs (replacing Spark)

Exhibition: The Search to See: Photographs from the Collection of Frederick B. Scheel; Minneapolis Institute of Arts
Artist: Philippe Halsman
Title: "Dali Atomicus?
Medium: Photography; Gelatin Silver Print
Year: 1948

This outstanding collection of gelatin silver prints donated by consumate collector Frederick B. Scheel features an array of celebrated photographers, inluding Phillppe Halsman. I was immediately struck by Halsman's work, and feel that amongst all the works on display this was truly a standout. It seems Halsman was fascinated by the Surrealists, and he by they. Halsman became especially close with Surrealist darling and future mustachioed loony Salvador Dali, and over the decades they colloborated on several projects. One of these, and perhaps one of Halsman's most famous photographs, is "Dali Atomicus" in which Dali is suspended in the air like some sort of Surrealist tornadoe, with his canvas, water, cats and furniture all frozen in space, swirling in suspended animation, caught like flies in some sort of photographic honey. I've always adored Dali, and felt as though his work, especially his early work, was mind-bendingly orginal. I don't think many would argue with me on that point. Here Halsman has captured Dali in a photographic reproduction akin to one of Dali's own paintings, and the technique, the composition of the photgraph is flawlessly executed, each component - the screeching cats, the rush of water, Dali's twisted smile- is astonishingly modern. I walked away feeling very lucky to have seen it.

A Better Place! (flipbook animation)

Media Mill Video

January 7, 2008

Sound Recording









January 6, 2008

Final Project








Seaworthy

Artist: Josie Lewis
Title: Great Expectations
Medium: found paper and resin
Year: 2008

With great swirling bands of multi-colored paper in what seems like 3-D, Lewis has created an almost organic sculpture behind glass. The swirls of highly textured, seamless yet chunky and strategically placed paper has both a beginning and an end point, but its not discernible to the human eye. The colors of turquoise, pink and muted shades of grey and purple combine together to give you a feeling of infinity, of timelessness. This is one in a series, and I was really impressed by her visual capacity to engage and at the same time produce a real decoratively appealing work. Really great.

Kuhr+Lyons Drawings

Artist: Alexis Kuhr
Title: Domestic Pyramid II, 2007
Medium: Graphite and Inkjet on Paper

I can really appreciate the clean and minimalist technique Kuhr obviously has a facility for (what’s wrong with white space, anyway?). This work is part of a series of triangles that she seems to place in the white universe up above, and the miniature version of the same triangle, with a tip dipped in faux wood paneling lends the work a certain cleanness, a simplicity I really like. I let my eyes wander from the first piece to the second and back again and it was a losing battle: her triangles had super soul.

January 5, 2008

Kuhr + Lions + Drawing Response

Hazel Belvo
Witch Tree Torso

I was really intrigued by this piece when I first looked at it. This piece is composed from graphite, tobacco juice, and vermillion which give it a very distinct texture. The most dynamic part of this piece that I found was the perception of the trunk versus the branches. The trunk appears to be solely in the foreground while the branches are concentrated in the background. This quality makes this piece very unique and interesting to observe. Also when taking the title into account, it appears as if the trunk of the tree could compose a cloak and a knob towards the top of the trunk resembles a head. Placing the trunk in the foreground furthers the resemblance of a body figure within the tree.

Visiting Artist: Matt Ryle

Matt Ryle is the production designer for Matthew Barney who is famous for his Cremaster Cycle films. Before the screening of Barney’s new film "De Lama Lamina", Ryle talked about filming with Barney and how crazy he can be. He didn't talk about himself too much. It was like he was representative of Matt Barney. I didn't stay for the round table discussion afterwards mostly because after seeing "De Lama Lamina" I had to step outside to get some air. It's a very strange movie. It's about a "float", if you can call a huge tree carrying tractor a float, in a parade while Ogan, the god of metal tools, growth and destruction has sex with the drive shaft. The tractor is carrying a huge tree that has phallic white stumps and someone who resembles that woman who stayed up in a tree for over a year in protest. Ryle commented on how they tried to get her to be the tree women in the movie but she didn’t want to pollute the air by flying over. The scenes cut between the parade goers, the girl in the tree and Ogan having his way with the tractors drive shaft. The whole film has references of creation and destruction peppered with metal tools. It was all very confusing and a lot to take in. The cinematography was amazing. He really explored the space even when there wasn’t much to work with, like under the trackter. It was thought provoking in an uncomfortable way. You can only watch a man with a turnip coming out his butt having sex with a drive shaft for so long

Visiting Artist: Amy Youngs

Most of the time when I go to the visiting artist lectures they are boring and the artists are smug and snobbish. Amy Youngs was different. She was just like anyone else... except that she makes amazing art. My favorite piece she made was a miniature living room for crickets. There was a little tv that displayed the viewer of the piece via camera and a micro phone that would translate talking into cricket chirps. She has set up relationship between us and the crickets. The crickets live in a little room furnished as if it was one of our rooms complete with a little TV showing our face. The sounds of the crickets are mic'd and pumped through speakers outside the box to us. We can then talk back to them through a telephone that translates our voice into cricket chirps. Youngs has created a two way interaction between the crickets and us.

Photoshop Tip

Holding the SHIFT key while in free transformation will let you make the
image bigger or smaller and keep the shape.

If you have a photograph or scanned in a negative you can get rid of most of
the dust and scratches by going to the remove dust and scratches option in
the filter menu.

If you are merging two images into one with the layering system you can
change the opacity of the top layer to fit them better and erase around it.
The opacity controls are located on the layer pop up window on the right.

BA Show

"pennyodean"
Michael Blomberg

A fascinating piece of work. The piece is reminiscent of the old boxes were you could see short films for a penny. The chalkboard exterior and circus theme draws you in, making you want to pay for a peek. When looking inside you see a distorted 3D image of people in their homes. It's as if you're looking in from the outside. A little creepy in my opinion. You can make some interesting conclusions off this project. Are we all just animals on display running around our lives and putting on an act?

The only thing I think could use work is the construction. The knob system was not sturdy enough to handle the operation by hasty people who don't read the instructions. The plastic lens' add a creepy factor but take away from the 3Dness of the pictures.

MFA Show

"Hello World! or: How I Learned to Stop Listening and Love the Noise"
Christopher Baker

When I first saw Baker's piece I was overwhelmed by the noise and visual stimulation. There are thousands of thousands of faces from Youtube.com all talking at once. It's everyone’s opinion on everything all at once in one space. When you listen to it long enough it's almost a kind of music. Every so often you can pick out someone saying something but all in all it blends together. The shadows on a the wall created by the viewer blocking the projection put you in the project and into the mass of people. It turns the viewer into another person with an opinion in the sea of people with opinions. I very much enjoyed this exhibit.

January 4, 2008

Juxtapostion Arts/ Constructive Criticism

Catiesha Pierson
For the love of sneakers 2008
Mixed media on wood

This was one of the smallest pieces in the graffiti inspired Juxtaposition Arts show. I was drawn to the composition and colors and identifiable theme of brand name as personal identity. It reminded me of middle school in the suburbs where girls drew brand name logos on their notebooks and lockers of Guess, Esprit, Benetton, and thought they were so cool!
It’s a bit of a overused cliché about gangs and inner city kids shooting each other for a pair of Air Jordan Nike sneakers, but in this piece, Catiesha does not explicitly address those issues. But the graffiti style of her work and the use of spray paint colors like neon pink and orange, she gets the message across while still creating an aesthetically interesting work. I like the different textures that are layered on the canvas. The Nike logo, the shoelaces, the stitching patterns, and my favorite is the thickly dried paint that looks like it was stepped on by an actual pair of shoes. The treads from the sole of the shoe leaves a “waffle? pattern in the thick paint.
Because this young group of artists come from this urban graffiti art background, the styles were similar but I enjoyed each of their unique style still coming through in their works.

Walker Art Center: Wurst Series

Peter Fischli and David Weiss
Wusrst Series 1979
Chromomeric prints

Here are a set of ten framed photos. “Wursts? or wieners are made in to cars or dressed up like people with peanut shell mustaches and bottle cap hats. One photo depicts the ocean liner Titanic surrounded by Styrofoam ice caps. At first this series has a very childlike playful aura about them. Like Legoland buidings and dress up dolls. But the underlying theme is that of natural and human made disasters. Cardboard buildings up in flames! Dangerous mountain climbing expedition amid bed sheets and pillows!

With the use of cigarette butts as human figures and dill pickles among cold cut deli slices, serious themes can be less intimidating to tackle.
I seem to be drawn to play food and imaginary worlds created with ordinary household objects…

Walker Art Center: Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama
Japanese, b. 1927
Oven-pan 1963
Paint, canvas, cotton, steel, wood

This oven-pan filled with metallic gold/broze colored “yams? caught my attention with it’s anthropomorphic shapes all crammed together leaning out of the pan. The materials are interesting, because the canvas filled with cotton has a soft plushy cute look, but at the same time is painted metallic bronze, so it has a hard cast metal feel to them.

In a crude way, they look like a pan full of animated turds, but also appear to be boatpeople crossing the seas or fishermen on a fishing trip.
These yam shapes have no facial features, but seem to be animated, because of the standing and leaning gestures and head-like tips. There is a slotted spoon/fryer strainer like ladle with small pieces of “potatoes? or something. They could be the fishing net or basket of the “fishermen? on the “boat?.

I like the use of ordinary kitchen utensils used in the scupture with the appearance of traditional cast metal look/ the subject matter remains ambiguous and can be as simple as Thanksgiving Day meal yams, or illegal immigration, etc. That’s what keeps the piece so interesting.

voice recording test








January 3, 2008

13x24x18

"Louis Vuitton"
Jessica Teckemeyer

Techemeyer plaster casted the inside of a $1020 Louis Vuitton hand bag. Along side this bag were others that were much cheaper such as a purse from Dots that only cast $20. It was an interesting comparison and made you think about how ridiculously expensive purses really are. The point of a purse is to hold things for easy carry. The inside of the purse is the important part. The inside of the Louis Vuitton bag looks very similar and just as spacious as a purse that costs $1000 less. The only reason it costs so much is because it has a designer name on it.

Chambers

Art-O-Mat
Clark Whittington

This is one of the coolest things I've seen in a long time. Having an art vending machine so that artists can get their work out to the public without having a show is genius. The retro look of the old cigarette machine helps to draw in people while the reasonable prices of the a piece, only $5, makes it so anyone can purchase one. I bought a couple pieces and found that I wanted to buy more and more. It's addicting. I will definitely be buying more and maybe even sending some of my own work in to be put into a machine.

You can find more about the machine at:
http://www.artomat.org/

January 2, 2008

Chris Baker's Project

As I was walking through the Kathryn Nash Gallery I couldn't help but hear a low noise, but I wasn't completely sure where it was coming from. I kept looking at the exhibits and as I made my way toward the far side of the gallery I noticed the noise got louder, and thats when I finally found the source - hundreds of videos with faces and audio to go with them. As I sat down to really try and take it all in I first found my self trying to find the single video from which the singularly more audible voice was coming from (which kept rotating eventually). As I searched the whole scape of videos I realized I was like trying to find a needle in a hay stack. But as I continued to pass over all of these people telling whatever it was they wanted to confess to the camera, I started focus on individuals more and more. After being in the room for a while I had reached the point of essentially drowning out the audio for the most part and would focus on people. I kept thinking about how it was cool that every single individual I could see had their own unique and personal story they were sharing with the world by videotaping a "diary" of sorts. Each had something they were trying to express to whoever would listen. As I was getting ready to leave again and kind of snapped back into reality (for lack of a better way of stating it) I once again could hear the mushed and jumbled sounds together and sort of went the other end of the spectrum with my thoughts on the project as I left because I then started just admiring the fact that collectively it seemed like chaos. But somehow within that chaos of audio and video stimulation I could separate myself from everything and had a moment where it all seemed to drown out and be quiet. That transition into, and consequently out of, that moment was the feeling that I remember most about the project.

Kuhr + Lyon Drawings

I really enjoyed Newmans Untitled piece. I was drawn to it because of huge size and pleasant colours. I liked how the calm colours contrasted with the tension created by the orange colours where the two loops meet. It reminds me of a destructive relationship. The two loops are peoples lives. Where they meet they hurt each other and grind down. Then they part and eventually come back and do it again. The two loops also resemble a heart together. Even without thinking up some bs to explain what it means it's a beautiful piece. I could just sit there and stare at it for hours.

January 1, 2008

Walker Exhibition

At the Walker Art Museum, I found Greg Stimac’s Mowing the Lawn (Chandler, AZ) to be humorous. I think it looks funny because the lawn is so dead that it does not really need to be mowed yet there is someone doing it. It also has a cultural/regional feel to it too because one would need to know the weather in Arizona to fully appreciate the idea behind it. The piece makes me wonder if Stimac saw this and asked to take a picture or if there was another way of creating it. I also wish I knew more about the initial idea Stimac wanted to portray with his work. Overall, I like the piece because it made me smile when I first saw it and it also made me question it a little ad search for a deeper meaning.

Photoshop Tip

My photoshop tip is about trying to match colors. If you are trying to color something in and want a specific color that is already on your picture you can double click on the color box and then the colors will pop up. If you take your mouse and click on a color in the picture it will automatically change to that color. I found this very helpful when keeping the same colors together.

Bohemian Exhibition

I am currently in a geology class so when I saw Allison Snopek’s 2008 oil on canvas painting I had to respond. The background has bright rainbow colors in circular swirls, which reminds me of a tomography map. Tomography maps are used to provide three-dimensional views of the Earth’s interior and are colored coded to show different temperatures. On top of all the bright colors she painted the continents with neutral, earth tones. The continents are viewed at a birds eye level which I think is created because the tomography maps are as well because of our satellite technology. The painting a lone is visually pleasing but it also brings up the issues around global warming and the effects the Earth’s temperature actually has. I especially like that a student painted it because I think it’s important for young people to be aware of the Earth’s issues.

Culturing Technology

During this exhibit, my attention was immediately drawn towards a piece by Allison Snopek, untitled. Its bright colors stood out so much! It reminded me of a globe because of the latitude and longitude lines and also the continents spaced differently throughout the globe. The rainbow colors seemed to represent the happiness that is all over the world today. Growing up, rainbows were always a fun, happy thing. You always tried to find the end of the rainbow, but for some reason it was never there! Almost in this piece with how the continents are spaced differently. You never find the end of the movement.

Walker Art Center

Artist: Joan Miro
Title: Femme Debout (Standing Woman)
Medium: Bronze
Year: 1969


Joan Miro has always been a problem for me. While I've always admired his work, truly admired his work, his sensibility, his vision, his grade schoolesque collages, there's just something about the SIMPLICITY of his work that leaves me wanting something MORE. Something a little more soul-searching and substantial than just the odd wispy collection of tidy shapes, deft scribbles and primary colors. No one can argue that he wasn't an original, and his bronze, Femme Debout, sort of defies my sound-off above because this piece really does have bite and whimsy and heft. Shaped like a ball on top of a cone, this alien-like woman in bronze has two bulbous eyes, a beak for a mouth, the usual upper body female indicators and most curious of all, a curved slit down her center. Yet, this slit isn't disturbing, it's almost graceful. The work IS graceful, and elegant, with its smooth lines and glossy bronze surface. Miro has deviated from his usual MO, and this piece really embraces the harmony of his work: the abstract, simple shapes coupled with a sublime soul. One of my favorite pieces at the Walker.

MFA Thesis Exhibition

BUS STRUCTURE 2AM-2PM (2008), by R. Justin Stewart immediately caught my eye. It looked like a suspended super-molecule suspended by many small weights. The whole piece seemed to be floating in a perfect balance. Upon further inspection, the hundreds of threads connecting the counterbalance weights to the structure were all nearly the exact angle same angle as one another. How this was done, or how long it took, i do not know, but what I do know is that it is very catching to the eye. The piece takes up almost an entire room, but the effect is well worth it. I have yet to connect the piece of art to it's name, but it doesn't matter, it was my favorite anyway.

Paul Shambroom "Meetings"

At the Weisman Museum I started walking around and looking at the 5 different series of collections of photographs that made up Paul Shambroom's "Picturing Power" Exhibition. The exhibit is Shambroom's look at 5 scenes of power - Factories, Offices, Nuclear Weapons, Meetings, and Security. Instead of trying to pick out any particular photo in the collection, I looked at it more broadly and decided to just talk a bit about one of the five topics as a whole. I thought that the 'Meetings' collection was very interesting for a few reasons. First was that I liked how he chose meetings to photograph that we from smaller communities from all over the United States, most places with less than 2000 people except for groups that concerned themselves with distinct neighborhoods in urban areas. As he said, he wanted to choose "meetings concerned with the general interests of their constituents." For me the most powerful thing about the whole 'Meetings' section of the exhibit was how it got me thinking about all of the real power that can be found in so many different forms throughout our country, the power democracy has. When you looked at some of the members photographed I found myself thinking how they didn't exactly fit the mold that someone maybe has for a council person, but to me that was what makes it awesome - there is no real 'face' to this power, it is just people who genuinely care for the good of their community in those smaller towns. When I initially thought about power, it wouldn't have been some of these places that Shambroom photographed but after having it open my perspective some it makes perfect sense. The power is all relative. It really was a eye-opening experience overall as well too, looking at different forms of Power and often in such up close and revealing images. One particular one that stands out to me that I wanted to just mention even though it was outside of the 'Meeting' realm was a photograph he took of some nuclear bombs at a military facility. The thing that just struck me the most was a man in the picture was just sweeping around them as if they were nothing but mere obstructions when in reality they are a world-altering weapon that is a symbol of power for not just our country but others who possess them. I realize that after being around them they would in some sense just blend into the fabric of the facility they were being housed, but as an outsider looking in it is something truly profound to wrap my head around.

Scholarship Exhibition

Having been raised in the north woods, I am accustomed to seeing deer mounts
in people’s houses. Some people enjoy them, and some people think they are
ugly. Claire Anderson seems to have solved the problem, she made ceramic
deer mounts that can be placed on the wall instead of real animals. Not only
does real art look better on a wall than once living animals, but the detail
in her work is very pleasing. Deer (ceramic 2007) is a white ceramic with
blue designs imprinted all over. I would much rather have her art hanging on
my wall than a stuffed mount, and I think that it would be a good idea for
everyone to try. Hang up art from people in your house, not art from mother
nature.

BFA Show

Thomas Hafner has traveled to many different places around the world and
taken pictures. My favorite is from Cambodia, called Daily Life in Stung
Meachey (Phnom Penh, Cambodia Digital Photography Dec 2006). The picture is
very vibrant and colorful, and the child has a big warming smile on his face.
However, the picture is of a trash dump and the kid is rummaging through to
find something of value. It is shocking how different countries are. If I
were rummaging through a dump, I probably would not be smiling. For this
young kid it is probably what he is used to. It makes me feel fortunate to
have the things that I do and that I have relatively a much easier life. It
is a beautiful picture.

BFA

At this exhibition, I saw many pieces that stood out to me. The artist, P. Kinne, had a few pieces that were untitled. These were done with ink jet prints, shellac, marker, and spray paint. They displayed areas near railroads. Each piece had distorted colors with a metallic look, which is due to the shellac. I wasn't sure what shellac was right away since I am not an art student so when I came home I looked it up. I believe this artist was trying to capture the greyness of railroads and almost the olden days. By this use of color, I didn't think it was something we would see nowadays, but I know from experience these places are all over the world!

Matt Groening

Matt Groening has been one of my favorite artists for as long as I can
remember. The cartoons he creates are not only funny, but are unique and
well drawn. One of his unique animation qualities is the overbite that the
characters have. His figures are easy to recognize and his work can easily
be spotted. Matt is best known for creating “The Simpsons,? but he has
helped create many other projects. He is from Springfield, Oregon and choose
to start drawing because of his dislike of school. His career started with
comic strips called “Life in Hell,? these eventually turned into “The
Simpsons.? It is interesting to note how much “The Simpsons? actually
represents Groening’s life. Matt’s mother and father are Margaret (Marge)
and Homer. His sisters are Maggie and Lisa. He was going to name Bart
“Matt,? but he thought this would too much resemble his family. Instead he
chose Bart from the word brat, he likens the character to himself and Dennis
the Menace. He also uses his aunt Patties name, but leaves out his father’s
name. Instead he uses his middle name Abraham, furthermore his two son’s
names are Homer and Abe. I like the fact that he is so involved in his work,
there isn’t a distinct line between his life and his cartoon. Watching his
work, it is very comical and non-serious, but after learning more about his
life I get the feeling that his work is very serious and personal to him.

Bohemian Press


The artwork I picked was Robyn Carley’s woodcut When it rains, it pours
from 2007. I picked this piece because it stood out from all the other
pieces and I made some woodcut art in High School and really enjoyed it. My
favorite part about it is the red umbrella and yellow rain boots because
those are the traditional colors of the two that I grew up with. I also
liked the piece because Robyn Carley made this simple idea into somewhat of
a political piece. Instead of raindrops there are green objects falling
from the sky that look like bombs. There is also a bunch of woodcuts that
cover the rest of the background which make the bomb images and woodcuts
blend together so they all look like part of the rain. I think the
artwork’s title makes the viewer think about the piece with more than one
meaning. It is a good saying “When it rains, it pours? because it goes a
long with the war theme as well as a life theme.

Walker Exhibition

At the Walker exhibition, right away I realized this was an exhibition where the artists could express their personal opinions on urbanization. I chose a piece by Chris Ballantyne. The reason I chose this piece was because it was constructed on a piece of wood. He was taking the side of urbanization as a bad thing. It was a picture of a group of trees surrounded by a parking lot. To me, it showed the effects of urbanization on the forests and lands. Many things are starting to be eliminated due to businesses being built. Urbanization is something in which everyone has their own opinion. It has been a very harmful thing to our economy.

As I was walking through the Kathryn Nash Gallery I couldn't help but hear a low noise, but I wasn't completely sure where it was coming from. I kept looking at the exhibits and as I made my way toward the far side of the gallery I noticed the noise got louder, and thats when I finally found the source - hundreds of videos with faces and audio to go with them. As I sat down to really try and take it all in I first found my self trying to find the single video from which the singularly more audible voice was coming from (which kept rotating eventually). As I searched the whole scape of videos I realized I was like trying to find a needle in a hay stack. But as I continued to pass over all of these people telling whatever it was they wanted to confess to the camera, I started focus on individuals more and more. After being in the room for a while I had reached the point of essentially drowning out the audio for the most part and would focus on people. I kept thinking about how it was cool that every single individual I could see had their own unique and personal story they were sharing with the world by videotaping a "diary" of sorts. Each had something they were trying to express to whoever would listen. As I was getting ready to leave again and kind of snapped back into reality (for lack of a better way of stating it) I once again could hear the mushed and jumbled sounds together and sort of went the other end of the spectrum with my thoughts on the project as I left because I then started just admiring the fact that collectively it seemed like chaos. But somehow within that chaos of audio and video stimulation I could separate myself from everything and had a moment where it all seemed to drown out and be quiet. That transition into, and consequently out of, that moment was the feeling that I remember most about the project.

Paradise and Purgatory Exhibition

The artwork that was most eye-catching for me in the Paradise and
Purgatory Exhibition was Steven Rooney’s 2008 oil on canvas piece titled
Britney. I was drawn in by the size of the canvas and the colorful,
abstractive flow of brush strokes. Rooney used a blend of blues, grays,
yellows, and reds as well as basic black and white to create his image.
When I saw the painting I immediately had questions, which I think is a
good sign of a successful piece. I began to wonder who Britney was and if
she had a significant role in his life. Was she his girlfriend, sister, or
just a stranger? In Rooney’s biography he explained that he was inspired by
his hometown New Orleans, Louisiana. He found its imperfections beautiful
and made his brushstrokes as spontaneous as he thought his hometown was.
Steven Rooney was one of my TA’s last semester so it was really fun to see
his work. It’s always fun to see artist’s style of painting, especially
when you have the opportunity to meet them and get to know their
personality.

Paradise and Purgatory

When I first went to this exhibit, I had troubles finding a piece that stood out to me. I am not sure if I just was not in the mood to look at art or if it was not my style. I finally came upon a piece by Fawnia Khan called Two Shadese of Gray. It contained two birds sitting in opposite directions. One appeared to be very smooth, almost perfect while the other one was not clean, and very ruffled. It is hard to say what Khan was getting at in this picture. I almost see as if it was displaying two different types of relationships. One being perfect with no bumps along the road, while the other seems to be very up and down with fights and struggles. This could just be my personal opinion on the art piece.

I Heart U Exhibition

In the “I Heart U? Exhibition, Patrick Vincent’s The Heart is a Weak
Balloon piece captured my attention. This 2006 lithograph and silkscreen
creation was an image of a realistic looking heart that looked well put
together with a black frame and maroon boarder. At first glance I thought
it was a detailed pencil drawing and when I found out that it was not it
made it a bit more unique. Another reason why I chose this piece is because
it is something I would display in my house. I like the colors Vincent
chose. The maroon, black, tan, and off white-tan colors work well with one
another. The picture had a darker tone than most of the others in the
exhibition, which I think helped tie the title in nicely. The title of the
piece allows viewers to think of many different reasons for the artist to
choose its name. The phrase, “The Heart is a Weak Balloon? first made me
wonder if he had just broken up with his girlfriend, since it was around
Valentines Day, but then I questioned if he had someone close to him die
and if so was it meant to be in memory of the loved one. Whatever the
reason, it turned out looking professional and unique.

Rachel B.

wilgr001@umn.edu
meforblog.jpg

Alcatraz

As I moved my way down the wall in the Quarter Gallery I saw a lot of interesting works, many different styles. The project that I kept coming back to was Benjamin Ette's "Alcatraz" pen drawing. At first glance I thought it was impressive, but it wasn't until I really stopped and took the time to look at it up close that I couldn't help but just be shaking my head - because its that impressive in detail to me. To give some back story, I first want to say that in High School I loved my architecture classes and that really is what the drawing first reminded me of. The physical, man-made structures within the drawing are done so professionally and cleanly. The sharpness of lines, the attention to scale, the precision of details - all were incredibly well done. Then as I started noticing everything else that made up the scene. Things like the jaded rocks on the shore, the bushes and vines, the sand on the beach all complete and fully capture a picture of Alcatraz. Another point I wanted to mention is how much detail and effort was put into the detailed shading throughout the whole work, especially when I thought about how it was drawn with a pen. Almost anywhere you look you can, at first glance, take what you see as a part of the whole work. But once you look closer at everything it is CLEARLY OBVIOUS the hours and hours of details that the artist put into it. Shading for light angles, waves in the sand, texture of the rocks - everywhere there is evidence of all the pain-staking detail that went into the drawing.

Chambers


All the art at the Chambers Hotel was exceptionally amazing and I had
trouble deciding what one piece I was going to respond to. I finally
decided to just drop my pen on my paper and write about the next one that
caught my attention. With this, one can see why my choice resulted with
Subodh Gupta’s 2006 stainless steel Other Thing. It’s one of the first
artworks one sees because of its three-dimensional size and location.
Through the front doors it rests first on the main hallways wall extending
205 cm x 210 cm ∅ 63 cm. It’s made with a numerous amount of stainless
steel chimtas, which is a kitchen tool used for frying rotis. Gupta’s
statement explains that he is from India and he tries to mix his
traditional culture with a modern style within his work. He often uses
everyday utensils, like kitchen tools, and creates massive pieces of work
to make them aesthetic. I found his work to be successful and feel that he
accomplished what he wanted it to attain. Gupta’s statement about his art
was very useful because I would not have understood the cultural references
he added within it. Knowing that extra detail allowed me to appreciate its
meaning and beauty even more.

I Heart U Exhibition

In this exhibition, I had one piece that truly stood out to me. It was a piece by Patrick Vincent called The Heart is a Weak Balloon. It appeared to be a heart with a black frame and a red shade border. It was almost a piece done in all pencil. This piece had a darker tone which helped the heart stand out. The name of the piece alone was something that made me sit there and ponder. What exactly did he mean by the title? When I think of a weak balloon, I see something that cannot fly very high or at all. It seems to bounce up and down, but never going to high. It is almost very slow.

I Heart U Exhibition

In this exhibition, I had one piece that truly stood out to me. It was a piece by Patrick Vincent called The Heart is a Weak Balloon. It appeared to be a heart with a black frame and a red shade border. It was almost a piece done in all pencil. This piece had a darker tone which helped the heart stand out. The name of the piece alone was something that made me sit there and ponder. What exactly did he mean by the title? When I think of a weak balloon, I see something that cannot fly very high or at all. It seems to bounce up and down, but never going to high. It is almost very slow.

Constructive Criticism

Artist: Ezra Wilson-Nausner
Gallery: Chambers Burnet Art Gallery /Juxtaposition Arts
Exhibit Title: Constructive Criticism
Title: GURLS
Medium: Painting
Year: 2008

I truly think this was the standout piece of the show. Perfectly situated, it almost beckoned be over to take a closer look. It had a real musicality to it, it truly hummed with its text and graffitiand its strong and stout-faced girl in right corner, it reminded me of a Kandinsky piece, except with REAL soul. This work also reminded of the late, great Jean-Michael Basquiat, with its bold colors, naive imagery and PERFECT meld of urbanized reality and poet’s lament. I loved the collage effect, and the use of the wallpaper-like wash over the mouths and faces of girls disembodied on canvas. The statement here I think is one of almost subdued confusion, sort of an homage, but also a diss to all the “GURLS.? Really, really interesting. Overall, I was TRULY astounded by the skill and genius of these artists. WOW! I never felt so untalented in all my life walking away from an exhibit. What an amazing gift to carry inside of you.

Constructive Criticism

Artist: Ezra Wilson-Nausner
Gallery: Chambers Burnet Art Gallery /Juxtaposition Arts
Exhibit Title: Constructive Criticism
Title: GURLS
Medium: Painting
Year: 2008

I truly think this was the standout piece of the show. Perfectly situated, it almost beckoned be over to take a closer look. It had a real musicality to it, it truly hummed with its text and graffitiand its strong and stout-faced girl in right corner, it reminded me of a Kandinsky piece, except with REAL soul. This work also reminded of the late, great Jean-Michael Basquiat, with its bold colors, naive imagery and PERFECT meld of urbanized reality and poet’s lament. I loved the collage effect, and the use of the wallpaper-like wash over the mouths and faces of girls disembodied on canvas. The statement here I think is one of almost subdued confusion, sort of an homage, but also a diss to all the “GURLS.? Really, really interesting. Overall, I was TRULY astounded by the skill and genius of these artists. WOW! I never felt so untalented in all my life walking away from an exhibit. What an amazing gift to carry inside of you.

Constructive Criticism

Artist: Ezra Wilson-Nausner
Gallery: Chambers Burnet Art Gallery /Juxtaposition Arts
Exhibit Title: Constructive Criticism
Title: GURLS
Medium: Painting
Year: 2008

I truly think this was the standout piece of the show. Perfectly situated, it almost beckoned be over to take a closer look. It had a real musicality to it, it truly hummed with its text and graffitiand its strong and stout-faced girl in right corner, it reminded me of a Kandinsky piece, except with REAL soul. This work also reminded of the late, great Jean-Michael Basquiat, with its bold colors, naive imagery and PERFECT meld of urbanized reality and poet’s lament. I loved the collage effect, and the use of the wallpaper-like wash over the mouths and faces of girls disembodied on canvas. The statement here I think is one of almost subdued confusion, sort of an homage, but also a diss to all the “GURLS.? Really, really interesting. Overall, I was TRULY astounded by the skill and genius of these artists. WOW! I never felt so untalented in all my life walking away from an exhibit. What an amazing gift to carry inside of you.

George Morrison - (Untitled) 1977

kathryn nash exhibit.jpg

(Up Close View of George Morrison's Untitled 1977 Drawing)

One of the first works that I came across and sparked my interest at the Kathryn Nash Exibit was an Untitled work by George Morrison which he did in 1977. What drew me in was how I found I could look at the drawing from different perspectives and it yielded different interpretations of what made up the work. Looking at the whole picture from a more distant perception, it appeared that the "waves" had an overall pattern with the lines intertwining. But when I got closer and would examine any given section of the whole work it felt like the interaction between the "waves" of lines was seemingly random and disconnected from surrounding patterns. Finally, after backing-out it again is back to appearing to have a strange sense of uniformity. I say "strange" simply because the work really seems to me like DOODLING taken to the GRAND scale, one that is extremely complex and involves a lot of thought. The term isn't meant to be demeaning, thats just simply how it first came across to me and is how I feel to best describe it. Also, just wanted to note that I found this the most interesting exhibit that we've gotten a chance to see up to this point, there were a lot of works that I really had me just shaking my head wondering how some people can be SO MUCH more artistically creative than me...ha...

Steven Rooney - "Britney"

The piece of art that I ended up deciding to discuss was one that initially I wasn't exactly drawn to. I was going around the 4th floor of Wilson Library looking at some of the different works and I for the most part looked at Steven Rooney's two paintings and then moved on. It wasn't until after I ready a little note beside the paintings that I went back and gave them another look. After looking more at his "Britney" oil paining on canvas, I looked at it differently having read some of his comments. I found it interesting how he said, "I do not like calling them abstractions because although they may look distorted or abstracted, they are in a direct response to what is real." So I went from before barely knowing or recognizing anything within the work to now feeling at least some understanding of what was going on. Its difficult to make out much more than the female's overall kneeling posture, along with her golden hair. Within the face of the subject there are eyes that are dark and soft which come off to me as she is really in a calm state. That calmness of "Britney" seems to be in sharp contrast to the complete abstract/active nature of the rest of the canvas. That is why I think initially I was somewhat distracted by the overall obscurity of the painting, but when I really tried to take it all in I feel like I got at least SOME of what the artist was trying to portray - which I often feel I have a difficult time doing when looking at art (especially really abstract stuff).

Spencer Wirth-Davis..."Mythed Bodies"

This collage of images makes a statement about the true role the media and popular culture play in the way many people (unfortunately) perceive themselves. Personally it just makes me think about how much we as a society are BOMBARDED every day with images of slim/muscular/big breasted/good looking/sexual content and even as much as people may try to distance themselves, it is not escapable. His work is (as it is intends to do) a sad reminder of how overly emphasized certain things are within our society and it is tough to think about the fact that all too many people cannot separate the advertising and marketing ploys of corporate America from the personal self evaluations. As I look at all the images and how they are so cluttered across the wall it relates, for me at least, to the feeling of how we are overwhelmed by all of these types of images and advertisements and getting away from true, real-life bodies and aspirations for how people really should view themselves vs. the virtually unattainable perfection all-too-often portrayed through things like these advertisements.

MAEP Exhibition: Andrea Stanislav

In the MAEP exhibition, Andrea Stanislav’s River to Infinity- The Vanishing Points, at first glance was eye catching. The first part used a lot of mirrors and metallic looking rocks to display a calming landscape. The second part included two ideal sized horses without their heads, covered in shiny crystals. On the walls there were olden day, circular calendars and pictures of Indian faces on square mirrors. I really liked the visual appeal of this piece but I did not understand it at first. After reading Stanislav’s statement I realized that it was about the beauty of Western culture and the disappearance of the natural world. After reading the statement the symbolic images became clear. By the landscape there were two projections showing images like an owl, a circular pattern of the big rock-shaped objects in her landscape that blow up showing a big explosion, and the pictures of Indians. These all correlate to the idea that humans do not think of nature as they once did, and everything now, even our landscapes, represents our culture’s ways. Stanislav did a very good job with creating an emotional and visual appeal, which then allowed its viewers to think deeper for the meaning.

Franklin Art Works: Oliver Michaels

At Franklin Art Works, Oliver Michaels: Train was an exhibit I am glad I got to experience. This was my first time inside the Franklin Art Works building and I hope it is not my last since it’s so close to my house. Inside I found myself liking the set up because it was open yet separated. I like how Michaels’s video was curtained off in the front and secluded because it allowed me to focus on the video without any interruptions. If I had only glanced at Michaels Train digital projection I would have figured it to be a camera on a toy train going through his own house. For this piece I feel that one must sit and watch the entire twelve-minute projection to understand some of the symbolic glimpses Michaels adds. The train goes through many different rooms and shows different seasons outside including a gloomy winter and a dry summer. In his handout, Michaels explains that the setting is focused on the public and private interiors of a British middle-class home. With this knowledge I can understand why he decided to pause and still the camera on certain places for instance, the train stopped and focused on a toilet. I think it’s interesting how the train is never seen; yet the viewer can tell by the title and visual flow of the camera that they are following the path of one.
Digital art is a relatively new art form that struggles for acceptance because some see it only as a by-product of computer programming, which then presents the question of what constitutes art. Unlike other digital art, Michael’s projection, Train, was aesthetically successful and is a true form of art because it allowed me to take a minute (actually twelve) and think about what the journey was trying to tell me. I had to question what I thought it meant and by doing so I looked at certain objects in the video and used them to remember memories, and symbolic meanings for myself. I later read the handout and saw what he had wanted it to symbolize, which were different from mine. I enjoyed the artwork and the building because they allowed me to reflect on my thoughts, memories, and art in general.

Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Over spring break I visited the Getty Museum in Los Angeles, California. All of the parking is located at the bottom of the hill going about 7 stories down. After parking, all of the visitors mount an electronically controlled white plastic tram that crawls upward through a wooded and angular landscape. Approaching the museum, it appears heavenly and futuristic. Most of the walls have a facade of coral and trilobite laden stone arranged into an offset mosaic of squares. Almost all of the building is white or tan which in conjunction with the nearly 360' view from far above the city, creates an ethereal and modern vibe. The gallery spaces have an organic and somewhat modular design. Also, great effort was made to supply natural light to all of the galleries to reproduce the light with which the works were created.

The works consisted of renaissance to modern paintings, sculptures, photographs and decorative. There were interactive areas that allowed visitors to better interpret and relate to the works. For example, an all white room with 7 sets of: white psuedo-classical chair or bench, suspended LCD screen, video camera. Sitting upon the chair, the video from the camera is instantaneously processed to key out the background making it appear as if the sitter is sitting on exquisite old furniture in the middle of a period room.

A kids room invited children make sketches of works of art, make their own illuminated manuscripts and sit/play in a miniaturized and plastic princess's room.

This museum had a great balance of good views, architecture, modern and historical art, and interactive and gallery format. One of my best museum experiences

Chambers

I chose a piece that was in the waiting room. It stood out to me because of the intensity it seemed to contain. It was a piece called Salustiano by Gorge. This man travels the world for subjects for portraits. He uses natural pigments. This art work was a child in a red jump suit with only his face and ears showing. Everything else was a shade of red. The outline of the body was faintly noticable. The face was very monitone, almost sad. This child had bright blue eyes that just stuck out. I chose this piece because of the way the artist truly knows how to capture an audience. It was the first piece that stuck out to me.

Innovative Touch (Video)

When I went over to the gallery I began looking around at the few different projects. A few of the projects that involved some electrical or moving parts (based on the sight of wires) were not up and working, which was a bit disappointing because it would've been good to get the full experience of each project. But then I saw that a TV was on, but there was nothing playing. I ejected the DVD and put it back in and pushed play - and the video I watched ended up being what I have decided to write about.

I watched Stacey Holloway's "Innovative Touch" digital video project.

Initially, as I began watching I thought it was a cool idea how she was getting shots of so many different people creating such a wide variety of art projects from paintings to woodwork to clay sculpture to metal sculptures etc, etc. As I continued to watch the video the next thing I notice was how, as it moved from scene to scene, the clips would be (for the most part) from alternating sound environments. By this I mean there would be a shot of someone working in a quite, more intimate setting maybe doing something like a painting and then it would be followed up by a contrasting environment like in a workshop with someone building a metal sculpture with lots of noise and activity involved and surrounding the shot. One of the clips that was maybe near the halfway point of the video you could hear a guy in the background speaking/somewhat-shouting, "take a look at these hands." This was when it "clicked" in my head - there was something that was tying all the differing clips together, the HANDS. Each shot focused on hands while they were doing something (which was, for the most part, creating some form of art). Also, all of the shots are from a close up perspective being shot only a few feet from the subject so you never did see any faces or much of the background. But prior to this point I had really been noticing what the hands had been actively doing, not necessarily the hand itself. After this I started focusing more on the hand itself in each shot. The last half to 1/3 of the video also included a few shots of even closer up views of hands (like on was looking at a weathered thumb of some guy, another was of a girl's hand as she was tucking her hair behind her ear). After completing the video I started to think about what the video meant for me, and before I could I realized it was on a loop - so I watched the video a second time around, ha. But after that I guess I just started thinking about how the video uses so many different types of hands doing such a wide variety of activities (most of which pertaining to the creation of artwork) and to me it gives of the message about the real diversification of artists and how they all have something different and unique to contribute no matter what medium the may be working with, they all bring something to the table. So I guess to wrap it up I would just say that watching the "Innovative Touch" digital video project was actually really interesting in how it really brought about an evolving thought process for me as I went through it. Also, just as a note, I liked how she ended the video by showing the tape that pops out of the video camera that she has been supposedly taping all these things on - its labeled "HANDS" for all those non-intuitive people such as myself that may have taken a bit to really get the subject matter, it was a sort of "aha!" moment possibly if someone was lost through the whole video, ha.

Tectonic Industries

Artists: Helen Stringfellow, Lars Jerlach & Evan Drolet Cook
Title: Tectonic Industries: The desire to stay versus the inevitability of change
Medium: Video Installation
Year: 2008

This exhibition really denoted a sense of the creepy and absurd, and an eerie dissemination of space and time. The artists on video were supposed to be renacting (??) the infamous film by Hitchcock, “The Birds?, and did so by almost woodenly (yet also animatedly!) talking at the same time, and being silent at the same time. It was like the human element; or rather the human act of communicating had been abolished and replaced by Tippi Hedren (the actress in the birds and Hitchcock’s Barbie doll). Walking in was an experience; a blur of TV sets that displayed simple, at-home scenes of bland nothingness. A middle class sickness, perhaps? I don’t know, but I really found the exhibition unnerving. And this is as it should be, for art is supposed to make you step out of your own narrow plane of existence and make you THINK – about yourself, the world, the very ACT of living. Really this was brilliant. I hope to see this group show again.

BFA graduating show

As I was waiting for a class to get over so I could use our room I started looking around at the new exhibit. As I came across P. Kinne’s 2008 Untitled Acrylics and marker, inkjet print I had to respond. I love all these exhibits because they allow me to see how artists combined mediums together to create unique pieces. I have never used inkjet but after seeing how clear and focused it looked on Kinne’s artwork, it made me want to try it. I wanted to reach out and grab it because the images looked so real! I really like it when I have to question the artist’s intentions and reasons for creating something a certain way, or placement of certain things. In Kinne’s artwork, I had to do that for the marker and acrylic as well as the repetition in the storyline. I also noticed there was a Chinese symbol in the inkjet part of the piece. This makes me wonder what it says, or symbolizes in Kinne’s life or if it correlates with the story. I also liked the placement of the writing and the fact that it was handwritten because I think it gave it a more individualized, emotional appeal. The artwork, as well as the rest of the series, is beautifully done and I would be proud to display one in my home.

MFA Seaworthy

At the Seaworthy exhibition at the Nash Gallery I thought all the artwork was exceptionally beautiful. All of the vibrant colors the artists used added a perfect seasonal touch for spring. Josie Lewis’s 2008 Spire, Compact, Bridge work as well as the rest of the series was interesting to me. I loved how they were all made with found pieces of unique paper and resin. I had to ask the worker what resign was because I had never heard of it and when I found out it made me want to go home and make something with it. The resign gave it a clean finish as well as a 3-D affect because she used it in layers, which made the paper forms seem everlasting in a deep, mysterious orbit. By using a wide range of names for the titles while having the artworks appear similar in style it gave the viewer a glimpse of the artist’s personality, or it at least made me think she has a fun, humorous attitude and I envisioned my Aunt. Due to this I think the artwork was very successful because I liked the unique combination with materials, patterns, colors, and titles. Also to have a contemporary styled piece of patterned paper remind me of my Aunt and family memories is a big accomplishment that I believe requires a lot of talent.

Favorite Artist

One of my favorite artists is Ronnie Landfield. He was born in New York in 1947. Since I have not had a chance to study much about art, I did my own research online and happened to stumble upon Landfield's work. I truly enjoy the colors he uses. He is an abstract artist, who's paintings make you question what he wanted it to come across as. Many paintings are colors blurred into each other to form a painting. I saw one piece called the Deluge. When I look at it, I see a sunset, with all the colors of the rainbow. The sunset is full of so many beautiful colors. In this piece, there is no sun, grass or anything else that you would picture in a normal sunset. Instead there are just the colors of the sunset streaked together. Abstract art is very intriguing to me. I could sit there for hours trying to figure out what he meant by it, but yet when I finally decide what I think it is a picture of, I could be wrong! Ronnie Landfield has produced many pieces of art that have won numerous awards. To me, he is very inspirational and I give him credit for the work he does.

Paradise and Purgatory

The Paradise and Purgatory exhibition was art based on religion. This art is always fun to look at because the message is so strong and the pictures are so moving. I chose to write about "The Garden of Earthly Delights." The art was done in 1505 by Hieronymus Bosch. The picture had three sections, the garden of eden, paradise, and hell. The first two sections were the virtuous people who were naked, frolicking, and just enjoying the beautiful day. However, if they did not follow the rules and went to hell, it would be dark and demented, with people suffering. Monsters and beast also populated hell, so if you wanted to have the fun party in paradise, you have to follow the religion. I feel like it is more of a advertisement for Christianity more than anything, but it was a nice colorful picture to look at.

I Heart U

The piece I chose was the "aural affections" piece. It was just a video of two people kissing and making various sounds. I liked how as the video looped, the sounds remained and then added more to the mix. It was an entertaining way to see how two people progress in love, even if it's only the physical aspect of it.

I heart U

I heart U had the theme from Valentine's day. My favorite work of art was called Hollow bones (DVD, 2008), it was created by Aural Affections. The DVD had clips of video and sound that when put together made a song. The music was made by the sound of kissing and other affectionate noises. It was very interesting because a kiss can be pleasurable to a few senses, but rarely to the ears. The DVD gave the illusion of the couples showing their affection was as if they were making harmonious music. This is something most of us want to feel, and it was nice to see a lighter piece of art to make it easy to see and enjoy.

Photoshop tips

The tool I found most useful was holding control and shift when using the lasso tool to crop our my image. It allowed me to get precise with the cropping. I also thought the filters were a good way to change the mood of the image in a quick way.

Paradise and Purgatory

Why Does the Cooped Chicken Dance? : Music Box
Stacey M. Holloway
Cast Bronze, Wood, Motors and Mixed Media
2007

This sculpture really captured my attention because it was like seeing a dollhouse sized barn in a corner of Wilson library. The tag on the wall invited me to open the coop door and when I did, a scene out of a picture book! A bronze chicken ballerina wearing a lacey tutu was doing pirouettes in the middle of the coop in front of a beveled beribboned oval mirror on the wall, with a naked light bulb lamp as a spotlight. And it was a music box. Classic with its girly ballerina theme and the melody was, I believe, You Are My Sunshine. I think most women recall having a music box as a young girl. I actually had one that was shaped like a piano and the ballerina inside spun to the music of Swan Lake….
The artist states that she uses “humor? to create a “portrait? from past experiences, while inviting the audience to participate in the piece with “points of entry?. She is very successful in drawing the viewer in by first piquing curiosity with a closed door. And who does not want to know what is behind a closed door? The details and craftsmanship in the work is very impressive. The wood and corrugated metal roof has a weathered rusted look. I love the authentic detail such as the hay inside and the shelves and the floorboards that remind me of a stage or a dance studio. The stand is built to match the coop and brings the piece closer to eye level. It’s like being invited to play with a dollhouse.
The chicken at first seems full of playfulness and gaiety, but actually it’s quite lonesome and the scene has a melancholy mood. It is all alone, “cooped? up in the chicken coop, dancing all alone. Animals are easier to interpret I think, for many people than other humans, at least for me…
I actually could have watched the chicken spin around and around for a long time, but being that I was in a library and it’s very “Quiet Please!? in there, I turned the music off after a while, as to not disturb the other people trying to study in the library…

Chambers

Guupta's "Something Else" was the most fascinating piece throughout the tour, although most were interesting. His use of everyday items like the tongs was a great way to make something so ordinary seem so amazing. The idea of turning things that most look at as nothing special and making it into something that was so visually outstanding is a great thing.

Robert Silvers - "American Flag"

Once I FINALLY got to the Chambers Hotel, after a hectic trip preceding it, I was glad to find that it was a really interesting place with lots to see and experience. It is really a cool idea with the whole Hotel/Art Gallery combination – the whole “experience? of the rest of the hotel all fits and ties together with the contemporary art that fills it. I had to laugh when our tour guide (forgot her name? sorry!) showed us the Robert Silvers “American Flag? (2004) because she mentioned how it was a popular piece for many of the guests because its something the can quickly understand and grasp – which is obviously clearly what I thought. But besides feeling like a completely unoriginal amateur art enthusiast, I did think the Photomosiac piece was a multi-faceted work. I say this because it somewhat reminds me of the George Morrison piece I looked at a few weeks before where you can perceive basically two completely distinct works depending upon your perspective. From a backed-off position, as we were when we were first shown the piece, you can clearly make out the waving American flag. Then upon moving closer and looking at each individual picture that make up the mosaic, you can find yourself getting lost in all the different (often recognizable) beautiful views from around the country – and in this examination you lose track of the deep perspective and that they all work together to create a larger work (the flag) as well. It was this dynamic that had even the attention and appreciation of an art beginner like me.

Queensbridge Wind Power (Video)

Over break I made my way to the Katherine E. Nash Gallery and started to look around. The project that I ended up finding the most interesting was after I watched a video project put together by Andrea Polli about her work concerning the Queensborough Bridge. Polli is an artist who works in Manhattan and lives in Queens, so she daily uses the historic bridge. What she discovers one evening is how the bridge no longer outlined by lights as it has been for years. The lights provided a real beauty to the bridge and without them much of the experience is lost she feels. Polli also describes the contrasting scene while viewing the bridge from a little distance where one can see upwards of 20 different smoke-stacks in the area which really take-away from and make ugly of what should be a beautiful site of the historic bridge during hours of light. After discovering that the city felt that it couldn't afford to pay the $75,000 out of the budget to keep the lights on, Andrea Polli came up with an alternative. She, along with the help of some others came up with concepts using wind turbines atop the bridge's two "points" to generate power for the lights (and possibly more for nearby areas). Why I thoughts this was so interesting is because it really is a complete collaboration between the functional, economical circumstances along with the aesthetic factor. Polli and those with her came up with designs that don't simply incorporate the turbines for the use of power, but they really are trying to incorporate them seamlessly together within the overall design and look of the historic bridge. That is the artistic part of the project that I really appreciate, its taking something that makes sense not only for practical and even economic purposes with the talents of creative an artistic minds that make the complete idea a lot more appealing and meaningful. In the somewhat documentary-style short video about the project the artist talks about how in times of economic crisis, aesthetics will be the first things sacrificed, but how those aesthetics are really things that affect the quality of life. So, again, that is why this project was "cool" (for lack of a better, more artistic term) to me because it shows how people and society can take technology and incorporate it into our lives today and really make a difference. And that change doesn't have to be a clash with current lifestyles, just small changes that can really add up.

The link below will take you to the artists web site and the section dedicated to the Queensbridge Wind Power project.

http://www.andreapolli.com/queensbridge/

Edward Kienholz
Nancy Reddin Kienholz
Pedicord Apartments
Mixed Media 1982-1983

I visited the Weisman Art Museum right on campus to make-up the "I Heart You" exhibit I missed. I chose to write about his piece because it is so unique and nothing I have ever seen before and I also like collaborative art. I liked that element of questioning whether this was really art or not. I wanted to study the piece to answer that question. And, my initial thought was that there was no way a replica of an old Seattle apartment building form the early 80's was going to do it for me, artistically speaking. But, after experiencing the piece, the smells of the musty carpet and the stale smoke, and hearing the creepy sounds of the old floor creaking an the noises coming from individual apartment rooms, and seeing the old furniture and not seeing much at all. This steered up a lot of emotions and feelings. I felt curious about what was behind each door and listened for awhile and each individual door had different emotions tied to them. I felt scared to even walk down the hallway. There was also a sense of mystery. So, all in all I left concluding that this was a wonderful piece of art because I believe art is anything that arouses inner emotions and thought.

Josie Lewis
Cut Paper 2008

I really enjoyed this piece because it is one of those that is a bunch of small aspects to create a larger whole. By this I mean, there are a bunch of smaller elements which have been put together to create one single piece. From a distance this work is about an entire eye; wit a closer glimpse you can see there are many tiny, individual eye cut-outs. The intricate detail of the placement of each eye cut-out creates a dramatic eye focusing right at you the viewer. With the artist info there was a passage from the Bible, "And as I looked, behold, four, heavenly creatures, and they had a wheel, and their rims were full of eyes round about (Exekiel 1:5)." I am unfamiliar with this passage from the Bible and also I am unsure if it is the title of the work, but I was able to see the connection between the passage and the piece. It has a circular formation surrounding the eye, like that of a wheel.


Daniel Chen
Daughter of the River 2008
Mixed Media on Wood

I unfortunately missed the Spark Festival, so to make it up I went back to Chambers Hotel and viewed the new exhibit in the Burnet Art Gallery. The new exhibit is Juxtaposition Arts - Constructive Criticism. I am a fan of "aerosol" and that was a large reason why I wanted to visit this gallery. The Burnet Art Gallery isn't a very large space, so all the art is visible at first glance. And, when I entered into the room this piece immediately caught m attention. the dark background with the brightly colored, off-set flowers was very appealing to look at. The first thought that came to mind was how beautiful it was. I really like how the artist also in incorporated aspects of language and sex into this piece. It is a very dramatic piece and the small amount of graffiti fits well into the piece. The message I took away from it was the strong interaction between beautiful words with sexual undertones.

River to Infinity - The Vanishing Points

River to Infinity – The Vanishing Points 2008
Andrea Stanislav
MAEP gallery at MIA

The experience of walking through this installation of mirrors, rotating headless rhinestone horses and video projection of exploding obelisks in the desert turned out to be a lot meaningful than I initially thought it would be.

My first reaction to the giant rhinestone covered horses on the turntables was that of Vegas glitz and My Little Ponies. I couldn’t figure out how the faces of the Native Americans on the mirrors’ surfaces connected to the astrological charts and the “Kaboom! Kaboom!? coming from the other room…the sound brought me back to the other side of the wall, where I took off my shoes and crossed the river stepping on the glittery rocks. I liked that the artist forces the audience to “cross? the river in order to walk around the pile of toppled down mirror obelisk and discover the two horse heads, that probably belong to the two headless horses in the next room. I watched the projection on the walls of the nine obelisks in the desert exploding. everything had a reflection. the river on the floor was reflected on the mirrored ceiling, the video images on the facing walls were the same…

I didn’t understand the meaning of the obelisks and horses and river without the help of the text on the wall: how the river is a symbol of “western expansion? and how the astrological charts represented “manifest destiny? and how the horses and native Americans represented the untouched west before the “white men? came and claimed it… but now, it seems really obvious. like I was too lazy to think on my own. I wonder if I would’ve been able to figure it out without reading the pamphlet.

I went back in to the room with the rhinestone horses and now, I saw the rhinestone horses like glitzy artificial Vegas created by humans to make a man-made oasis in the middle of the untouched desert.

Visually, I liked the lights and shadows on the ceiling the most. The rotating horses made the shadows and lights move on the walls and the ceiling.

Photoshop Tip

The most useful thing I’ve learned to use so far on Photoshop is the eraser
tool. I found that when you cut and paste an image onto a layer, you can
erase parts of the pasted image and the old layer appears. It’s really
helpful when you’re working on the main layer to duplicate it before you
start messing around with it. If you mess up and want it to go back to the
original way but you have used up all your ‘step back’ clicks, or for some
other reason it just won’t go back to the original you can use the
duplicate image you created, cut and paste the part you want back to
normal, and then erase around it so that just the part you want back is
visible. I’ve used this a lot, especially with text and color.

Rachel B.

The piece I chose was Mason Eubanks’ ink on paper. These kinds of work are very intriguing to me because it is a larger piece and there is so much detail put into it. From far away it seems like an interesting design but the closer you get the more you see inside the design. I am usually more attracted to pieces with loud color but this one caught my eye as I was walking by the window. Even closer you realize that the shapes are worms. I think this piece would look really cool animated.

I Heart U

Aural Affections.

This video elicits positive feelings, laughter/smiles, quirkiness and a subtle inhuman dynamic. The sounds and images of the couples expressing their affection or sliced, overlayed and sequenced into a rhythmic and tonal pattern that builds in complexity and sonically. The division of the screen into quadrants and other column, row, overlay techniques adds a mechanical and structural element complimenting the repetition. As the video progresses, the image and sound becomes increasingly dehumanized and abstracted into mechanical and electronic yet organic patterns. The choice of the title "Aural Affections" contains some interesting double meanings. Aural - Oral, such as kissing, saying sweet nothings, etc. Affections - Effect, the processing and digital abstraction of the video as well as the altered/affected interpretation of the content.

B.A. Senior Exhibition

B.A. Senior Exhibition

Sarah Renk
photographs, set of six
2008

The photographer took black and white portraits of six of her friends with their dogs, using a Holga camera.
I like the casual posing of the subjects and the gritty feel of the messy alleyways, mattresses, kitchens in the background.
Each pair of subjects shows the partnership between human and dog. I like how neither dog nor human dominates the portrait, but they share the space and the photographs are titled with both human and dog names, such as, “Malise and Bram?, instead of “Malise and his dog?…
My favorite is “Wendy and Merle? because Wendy is smiling and Merle looks all naughty gnawing on a big stick. and the background is a homey kitchen and it looks all friendly and fun.
The black and white and the darkening of the corners adds an aged retro look, which I believe the artist was going for with the use of the Holga camera. The black and white have nice tones with many greys – not too contrasty.

Chambers Gallery Hotel Restaurant Club

James Lecce. 2005 NYC. "Slow Drip Slither"[Red]"

Psychedelic orbs of acrylic polymer emulsion throb and ungulate. Lecce seems to have a great sense of polyrhythms and understanding of syncopation. The patterns have a balance between consistency and fluctuations, where one can feel the rhythm without repetition or angularity. The piece has a subtle 3-dimensionality to it, where the slight contours of the glossy emulsion reflect light at different angle to reveal a form that conforms to the image. The complete engulfment of the edges is very interesting and I am curious to see how his technique might translate to an organic 3d/sculptural palette more expressive than the rectangle canvas.

Culturing Technology

The artwork in the Culturing Technology exhibition at the West Bank Quarter’s Gallery was all very thought provoking and unique. It was filled with creative artworks that really expanded the idea of technology in the art world. I found the use of everyday objects cleverly aesthetic. The piece that caught my eye was the big red ball in the corner of the wall with orange foot print stickers below it. When I was first looking at it I thought it looked like a Mr. Potato Head. The use of the bright red caught my attention first. Red is my favorite color, which could be the reason for capturing my attention, but red is also known for doing so and the large scale of the ball played a part. The shadow the red ball casted made me question if the artist had intended on incorporating it into the piece. It also made me smile because it resembled Mr. Potato Head. I like the meaning behind the exhibition and think it’s important to question technology and the boundaries with it in the art world. It’s especially important in today’s world where technology has become so common in everyday routines. Many people are now questioning the significance and realism of art created with or by technology.

Scholarship and Fellowship Awards 2008-2009

Scholarship and Fellowship Awards 2008-2009

Brett Gustafson
More for your Money
mixed media
2008

A pastel drawing of George Washington recognizable from the dollar bill on black paper hangs on the wall without a frame. I am drawn to the gold and silver glitter on his jacket and collar. Then I realize the portrait is faceless. There are no facial features, but Washington is so recognized that I identified him without his famous face.
The small scale of this piece encouraged me to walk right up to it face to face and have a very close look at the detailed drawing done in a silvery white pencil.
I like the symbol of the dollar bill with the extra touch of glamour.

Seaworthy: Thesis Exhibition

I chose to write about Cheryl Clyne's thesis exhibition, and more specifically the back room of the Katherine Nash Gallery. Cheryl had a video playing of clouds, moving as they normally would in the sky. On the back wall were posted various works which included children playing in/on pinkish clouds. The children were see-sawing, playing catch, riding ponies, swinging, it was very cute. All the children had the heads of a bear. It was very interesting, because at first I thought they were playing on clouds, but as I kept observing, I thought maybe it could be pinkish smoke that simulates destruction, or even dust and they're playing on a foreign planet? While looking at them again as clouds, I decided that the children were playing in this heavenly-setting, enjoying themselves as all kids do. The clouds of the video solidified my idea that they were indeed on clouds, and I think overall, it created a sense of harmony, balanced by the heads of bears that may have instigated a hint of fear. The contrast was very neat.

Rachel B.

Neekol J. is 29 years old, born and raised in Minnesota. She grew up in a suburb of Saint Paul and now resides on the East Side of Saint Paul. She works for the Humane Society. She has a huge passion for animals and a not so huge passion for humans. Once a social butterfly, now she is a homebody playing with her cats or making art. She has definitely grown a lot as an artist as well as a person in the time that I have known her. Neekol and her artwork always cease to amaze me.

Some of the first pieces I saw were black and white scribbles of little peoples or creatures. The faces are often uneven and very raw. The eyes and the teeth often pop out at you, in a very creepy and intimidating way. Once in a while there will be a tiny splash of color thrown in. I am not a big fan of the creepy art genre but this series is quite cute to me.

Then she discovered Photoshop. I have seen a lot of work done by many different people in Photoshop but I would have to say that Ms. Jensen has a style all her own. Color in art is very appealing to me and I really enjoy when artist use it vividly! Neekol has an amazing eye for color. She loves to use her own image, often contorting her self into these very insane images. I feel that she often uses this as a form of therapy, telling the viewer how insane she really feels sometimes. They seem to me like dreams or drug induced hallucinations. Some would definitely describe them as a nightmare. She has also used images of the animals she works with. She has met a lot of strange animals with all kinds of backgrounds and she has portrayed their personalities by morphing their faces to tell what kind of personality they have, like she does with her own image. Her most recent project is making buttons. She uses skulls, crossbones, colorful faces and photos.

I have a real appreciation for her work because it is a medium that has been done many times before. Neekol’s work seems very original and stands out from the rest. Check out her images….http://www.flickr.com/people/neekol/

BFA Exhibit

The piece I examined was called "A Series of Equivalents" by: Christine Lenzen. Chistine displayed multiple photographs of trees. Some were framed in beautiful, wood framing while others just sat on a shelf. They were based on photographs by Alfred Stieglitz, but were indeed her own. I really like photography, which is why this struck me. The photos were darker, and somewhat ominous. They included clouds and were very detailed. As it seemed to be a winter scene, the trees had no leaves, so the branches and the details of every branch really stuck out. You could see the bigger branches and even the tiniest ends of them as well. The nature-like display was really neat, and I think Christine has a great skill of photography as these photos were very pretty.

Kuhr + Lyon + drawing

Alexis Kuhr
UNTITLED, 2007
graphite on paper


I liked the group of three that looked like plaid weavings or wood veneer strips. I’m amazed at the lines made by graphite, and wonder whether it was handdrawn with the help of a straight edge or she used some sort of contraption like those 5 chalk holding things music teachers use to draw scales on the blackboard…
I liked the stripes and overlapping plaid patterns the pencil made on the paper. I had to get up real close to see each mark. otherwise it could be taken as a bunch of weavings.
very geometric yet organic and handmade. well, if I free associate, it reminds me of apple pie crusts and garden lattices with climbing vines, madra plaid shorts, looms…
but, mostly I was amazed at the fine lines and keep wondering about her technique…

GIMP

I downloaded GIMP on my laptop since I don't want to spend hundreds of dollars on Adobe Photoshop.
I had no idea how to use it. then I went on Youtube and searched for "gimp" and there are many helpful video tutorials. lots of Photoshop tutorials are up on Youtube also :)

Water Ski Run

Download file

Download file

first autobio pic attempt

first autobio, fin.jpg

this was my first attempt at autobiographical image. though there are things i liked about it, it was much more of an experiment than a narrtive about my life. it took me a long time to do this one, but at the same time, it allowed me to create my next piece a lot faster. i kept doing more and more tweaking in this, and ultimately found it to be too much, and scrapped it to create a new one. there are some cool aspects of it that i like, for example, the blurred out cartoon in the background i used again in my next one, as well as having one of my guitars in the picture (the flying v in the background is "flying v" guitars). feel free to ask me more about it if you want more info.

Jaclyn Ann Stenerson - "Untitled" Silver Print Photography

After looking around the West Building and trying to take a look at most of the projects, I decided to focus on Jaclyn Ann Stenerson's project which was three silver print photos along the main wall near the hallway which leads to the art department checkout room. I have always enjoyed looking at photography, and there is something cool to me when I see interesting black and white photos. I think part of it has to do with how, even lacking a wide color range, a photo can still be so dramatic and powerful. The three photos in Jaclyn's project all shared a few unifying qualities in that they all were photos capturing empty city paths that she described as seemingly endless. In her 'statement from the artist' she said how the images capture life as she sees it through her eyes, and that how (as the photos capture) the feeling of isolation is the most beautiful emotion for her. I definately agree that she is capturing feelings of isolation and lifelessness with her photographs, all three are true in this way. The single photo that I found the most connection to was the image furtherest to the right, it was a shot taken at night of some city block with University Avenue running perpendicular to it. As I looked at it, I just felt a sense of slowing down of time, the picture for me represented a capturing of a moment of clarity and isolation from everything going on around. You see evidence of the world moving around with things like lights on, tire tracks in the street, parked cars down the block - but yet at the same time there are no people in the scene so there isn't a direct connection to others without any other life in the still image. Especially in this photo, I agree with the photographer that there is some moving/emotional/clarity feeling that consumes you in looking at the moments in time which she has captured in the photographs. At least for me, you have some sense of almost stepping out of the moment and just looking at everything around you as if you're not a part of it. You have a definite moment of clarity and isolation from everything around which brings strong emotion.

Security

Police SWAT, camouflage (Tuscon, Arizona, Police Department SWAT, “Terror Town? Playas Training Center, New Mexico), 2005
Pigmented Inkjet on canvas with varnish

This whole set of paintings is sort of odd, but ultimately I decided I like them. They aren’t really paintings per se, since they are pictures, but painted onto canvas. The man on screen is dressed in full SWAT uniform, and is posing for the camera. It really gives the image a GI Joe action figure ad type look, and makes it look very surreal. The man look very odd, and even the background desert looks off, while at the same time, everything looks traditional and authentic. I was trying to figure out what the artist was going for. If it is regarding 9-11, what does that mean? A lone guard in nature, not really prepared to help anybody… or training to help everybody?

bunnies

2239hillsdale.blog.jpg

tectonic industries: The desire to stay versus the inevitability of change

I'm not quite sure what to make of this piece. I have never seen the movie
The Birds, so initially I was unfamiliar with the dialogue. After realizing
it was from the movie I stood in the room and listened to the actors on the
screen recite the script. It was very intriguing to hear the exchange but
have no visual aspects from the movie. It takes a lot of the meaning away
from the actual movie. It was interesting how the settings of the different
actors were placed in domestic areas. I liked how the individual actors
went about daily activities; the period of time I watched it there was one
man who even fell asleep. I am still trying to make sense of the piece. I
think the title of the work "the desire to stay versus the inevitability of
change" places significance on the settings. I believe there to be a
correlation between a classic movies/time and current pop culture. We want
things to stay the same but with so many new things in the world that
stimulate our senses it is hard to appreciate the old.

Andréa Stanislav
“River to Infinity - The Vanishing
Points?

I found this exhibition to be breath-taking!! I loved the artist's concept
of "formalism and beauty" and how that represented herself. The combination
of sounds and objects created an emotion-filled experience. The notion of
ignorance against mother nature and how it is displayed is like none that I
have ever seen. It is definitely truth with beauty. But, the meaning behind
all the pieces is that of a great one. She wants us all to get past all the
illusions of the world and see the hidden truths. Conveying this through
mirrors was a great way of symbolization. My favorite part of the exhibit
was the headless, rhinestoned horses on rotating platforms. Even though I
am not quite sure of the meaning behind them, I can really appreciate the
aesthetic quality of them. The exhibit was by far one of my favorites and
like I said, none like I have ever seen before. I was very impressed.

Bohemian Press

I wouldn’t say “The Cat was Shot!? by Sara Shaylie was my favorite but it had a definite impact on me. When I was seven years old, I was a witness to the death of a kitten and this piece made me think of that incident right away. The cat or what was once a cat, flying limp through the air showing the instant life was taken. The gun is big, black and cold showing the death or murder. I think the colors were what evoked most of my emotion. I will never forget that feeling of shock and when I saw this piece that feeling came right back.

Rachel B.








photoshop tip resize batch


Before batch processing your images, you may wish to create a copy of the entire folder of your images.

Open up an image that is in the sequence that you will be resizing.

Window - Actions

In the Actions dialogue box, click the turning page icon to create a new blank action.

Name the action.

The Action is now recording. Any actions, (filters, resizing, levels, etc.) will be recorded to the action.

Image - Image Size: 480 Height, 740 Width. Okay.

In the Action dialogue box click the gray square. (Stop)

File - Automate - Batch: Select the folder where your images are located. Select the Action that you just created.

**DESTINATION: Select the Save and Close option.

Okay. Go!

I Heart U 2

The next exhibit that stuck out to me was "Aural Affections" by Hollow Bones which was a DVD produced in 2008. It originally struck me because it was digital art (DVD) which is interesting to me. It's basically a video of people kissing. The video is tinted red which adds love and passion. It was really neat as a silent DVD because it was repetitive and sometimes added picture in picture to make a neat affect. Upon putting on the headphones provided, I noticed that there are different sounds depending on the type of kiss or what was happening. As sound repeated, it created a beat which was kind of fun. Overall, this piece was visually and auditorily pleasing.

Tectonic Industries

This display had eight TVs on both sides. Each showed a couch or sofa or seating of some sort. There were some people sitting on some of them. Some talked or coughed, while some just stared into blank space. It reminded me of a horror film, being surrounded by all this video. Sometimes someone would respond to something someone else on the other side of the room said. There was an attack at a school, talk of the end of the world, or just some silence. It was hard to tell if it was recorded or live video/webcams streaming. I didn't see DVD players or anything. The room was dark, not more than 2 lights, and some people were drinking bottles of beer. It wasn't until I read about the art that I understood that it was a reenactment of the movie, "The Birds," in a simple setting, out of context. It was creepy, but that made sense because the movie itself was creepy. It all came together.

photoshop tip

while this isn't necessarily a tip for that actual editing of photos, it does make life a lot easier. when working with multiple different pictures, rather than minimizing and maximizing the different pictures, you can toggle through them by holding control [Ctrl], and pressing tab [Tab]. additionally, to go the opposite direction, hold shift and ctrl and press tab.

this same concept is also applied to when switching programs. just exchange ctrl for the apple key (or alt on a PC)

hopefully this is a clear description, but if it isn't just ask and i'll show you
- dan

Replacement for I Heart U

While none of the individual paintings were unique enough unique enough in their own right, I felt that the exhibit as a whole was very interesting. It showed the different regions within the country at the local level. The paints had many things in common, such as all of the people focused and serious towards their local government. At the same time, all of the different people and locations were very representative of the different regions of the country. Additionally, the political positions of each person feature is different. No region has the same governing body style.

Lucy’s Secret

Lucy’s Secret
Lindsay Montgomery
Pressed Molded Earthenware
2007

When I was first looking through the gallery, this piece seemed sort of unremarkable. I didn’t think painting a pot was unnecessary. But as I passed again it, I found it more appealing, and the concept added more layers to the interpretations. The paintings on it were of wolfman, and on the other side a vampire. What is Lucy’s secret? Is it that she likes scary movies? Or is she the vampire on the other side of it? Even the pot itself is sort of spooky; it looks like an urn with a bat for a handle. The colors too were Halloween colored, with oranges, yellow, and dark blues.

I Heart U

This exhibit made it hard to find a single thing to write about. Love is something everyone can relate to as it's so ubiquitous in everyone's life. I had to pick a couple to write about. The first I wrote about "Love Apothecary" By: Michael A. Wong. Made of wood/glass in 2008. It was the first work that stuck out to me as it had 26 bottles of different labels: Euphoric love, Unrequited love, 1st love, Ephemeral [very short] love, Forbidden love, Oceanic love, Melancholic [gloomy] love, Rekindled love, Undying love, Blinding love, Tragic love, Lost love, Ordinary love, Fragile love, Spoken love, Jealous love, Impulsive love, Passionate love, Innocent love, Serendipitous love, Precious love, Secret love, Selfless love, Fevered love, Stoic love, Frenzied love. It also had a syringe in the middle. All were on a shelf and corked. I felt like this was neat because it was like a little container for each type of love. Each time you have a type of love, you bottle it for later. And you can use the syringe to get some of a certain type of love if you want it. It was just interesting because I think that most people go through a lot of those different types of love throughout their lives and so it really relates to everyone.

Chambers

The piece I chose was Santiago Cucullu’s ’12 prints’. The colored lines seemed to me like a brain and the pictures were the memories stamped in the brain forever. I also liked how the lines were colorful but the memories were black and white, like old photographs. I responded to the idea that you were able to display the panels however the viewer chose to. That was very a very interesting and different approach.

I was very impressed with the Chambers Hotel. I thought their presentation was spectacular. I guess I expected it to be somewhat intimidating considering it’s a very high-end hotel with a gallery included. The atmosphere seemed very relaxed and comfortable. That’s not always the case when it comes to art galleries, at least in my experience.

There were so many pieces that jumped out at me that I am definitely taking my family back there to see them. I thought the stairwell was done very tastefully for it being graffiti art. I know my kids will really like the gorilla in the courtyard too.

photoshop tips

I found that using the burn tool (between the pen and blur tool) is an easy way to darken areas of your picture. When selecting burn, you can change to area of the burn to fit your application. It darkens the color that is being selected while keeping the shade appropriate. It seems to be much easier than selecting an area to change the color levels or selecting the right color to paint over. Using the blur tool after seems to make the end product look very nice, and realistic.

Bohemian Press

"Hawks Lust for Power" Ash Hane
Litho

Interesting dirty and apocalyptic atmosphere created by messy and organic overlay. The image of the hawks is very powerful in the context of the somewhat abstract and stark environment. Her work makes an interesting counterpart to fellow print grad student, Laura Corcoran's work. Both deal with the stark industrial landscape and different abstractions and symbolic aspects of birds. The palette is subdued and composed of grays, tans and soft greens, blues. Interpretable as either natural earth tones, or industrial concrete and chemical tones, the boundaries of the two worlds are blurred, strengthening Hane's allegories of the hawk.

Playing With Fire

Joseph Herrick, “Cleanliness is Godliness?

The metal work itself was what drew me in. I was very impressed with the ability to shape to metal the way the artist did. The incorporation of an actual broom handle was well thought out as well. What really stood out was the oil on and surrounding the piece that constantly changed the art. The piece never stops growing and will be different whenever it is looked at.

Playing with Fire

Paul Gill
"Tiresias"
Iron

Symmetry stills me.

Playing with fire

I chose “The boot and the six apostles? by Paul Gill because it made me giggle a little. I know that the artist did not have this in mind but it’s immediately what I thought of. The placement of the boot and the six apostles is almost identical to the placement of a bride and her bridal party. The boot, being the bride, is the center of attention. The smaller high heeled shoes, being the bridal party, on display next to the boot. I can relate since I have been both a bride and a bride’s maid. Being the bride made me feel very important and loved. Being a bride’s maid made me feel uncomfortable and on display next to the bride. I love that the boot is big and powerful and the high heeled shoes are small and insignificant compared to the boot.

Richard Long


Richard Long was born in Bristol England, where he works and lives to this day. He went to school at the West of England College of Art and there he found his style of art. His style is minimal yet romantic, modern, and conceptual. His art expresses the connection to land by using basic, natural materials and shapes. One example is when he used the ground as a canvas and stones as his medium he was able to create art with a circle on the ground with stones. He is influenced by his own travels in nature and has made many journeys through various types of landscapes. His finished product is about the landscape and the time he spend in it. Overall, the landscape around him influences the type of work he creates. Long makes art out of what he has physically accomplished. For example, making a design in the snow with his own foot prints, a sculpture with stone he finds in the mountains around him, or his own handprints dipped in mud. Throughout all of his artwork, his intent is to make walking an art by photographing art he has created during his travels by foot. He tries to record the relationship between time, distance, geography, space, and measurement. I saw one of his videos and I instantly became a fan of his work. I give him a lot of credit because his artwork requires a lot of patience and time. Before looking at his work I never even knew such things could be created. I really enjoy looking at his artwork and will always be interested in environmental art.

Angus Fairhurst

I revisited the bronze gorilla in the courtyard of the Chambers Art Hotel, but I could not see the title tag since it was covered in snow, but I looked it up and I think it is called, "A Couple of Differences Between Thinking and Feeling" made in 2003(?)
I guess art with animal subject matter always draws my attention...I feel bad for the poor gorilla with the missing right arm, but looking at his face he does not seem to be devastated. so he's looking at his chopped off arm on the ground before him, and he seems to be contemplating his predicament. He is "thinking" of what has happened to him, rather than "feeling" the magnitude of his tragedy and pain. he seems very detached and not seem to be suffering. I almost want to wake him up!
I think the scene seems very sterile because of the lack of color. there's no blood or gore. the texture on the sculpture is pretty rough and unrefined, so it looks more as if the arm fell off of a gorilla sculpture, like the Venus de Milo...
The gorilla had massive muscles, especially the shoulder blades, the buttocks. the head had a pointy conehead and massive brow ridge. I like it's location outside surrounded by tables and it looks like it's "mooning" the Ice Bar, haha...

Lyon + Kuhr+ Drawing


It was hard for me to choose which piece I wanted to talk about since there were three that really caught my eye. “The witch tree torso? by Hazel Bevo was very dark and narly. Alexis Kuhr’s ‘Untitled’ series was amazing with the texture of her graphite on paper. I decided on ‘Hildegard’s Home’ by Elizabeth Erickson because no matter where I was in the gallery, I caught myself going back to it. The colors are brilliant and beautiful. I felt as though I was looking through a stained glass window with some kind of rain or sleet hitting the outside and a hint of sunlight coming through the middle. Almost like a glint of hope shining through the storm. Not to sound cliché but I feel very connected to this piece with stuff that has happened to me recently.

Photoshop Tip - Magnetic Lasso Tool

One of the most valuable tools I have found up to this point is the "Magnetic Lasso Tool" which is one of the choices if you hold down on the third box from the top (grouped with "Lasso Tool" and "Polygonal Lasso Tool"). I found it valuable in selecting items which are not straight lines because it helps recognize differences in the picture which help you select different, odd shapes without having to literally TRACE out the whole shape with your mouse.

Give it a shot...if you like it, good...if you hate it, then bad tip (for you)...

Photoshop Tip

I have found the Free Transform tool to be invaluable. I can change and move an image's size, scale and position with a few clicks. I liberally use the Filters as well. I've really enjoyed experimenting with these tools.

Kuhr+Lyons Drawings

Artist: Alexis Kuhr
Title: Domestic Pyramid II, 2007
Medium: Graphite and Inkjet on Paper

Although I can appreciate the clean and minimalist technique Kuhr obviously has a facility for (what’s wrong with white space, anyway?), I couldn’t help but notice there’s a certain sterility, i.e. it's a triangle!, to the piece that just didn’t translate for me. I realize this work is part of a series, but a miniature version of the same triangle, with the same tip dipped in faux wood paneling (minus the “I?) just didn’t make up for the fact that Ms. Kuhr comes off as a primary-shape obsessive. I let my eyes wander from the first piece to the second and back again but it was a losing battle: her triangles had no soul. Maybe it got lost in the wood paneling.

autobiography

I was born in Wisconsin but I wouldn't say that's where I am from. I have lived in many different places in my young life. My mother raised me on her own. We often had to move to different places because of bad luck or bad people. I went to six different schools over my thirteen years of school. Once out of high school I didn't feel I was ready to start college. I wanted to be able to explore the world and find out who I was. After a little exploring I found my soul mate, got married and we now have three kids. When we got married he was finishing his degree and I was working full time and taking care of our home. I wanted to start school but I it didn't seem like the right time. Now just having our third child, I feel it's my time to finally start school. I am not sure what I would like to do yet. I am what some people call a 'people person' and I am very interested in where people come from and why people act the way they do. I am hoping to use that in my degree somehow.

Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí is a famous Spanish artist who was born in the early 20th century. His art is defined as “surrealism,? which is a type of art where normal, everyday, ‘real’ things are juxtaposed in weird ways or made to be less real. Dalí’s works seem to be influenced by those of the Renaissance-era. Dalí is thought by many to be crazy, but what artist isn’t these days? He went to art schools as a kid where he learned to draw and paint well. He grew up painting, more and more, and eventually painted his most famous painting, The Persistence of Memory, in 1931. This painting depicts a desert-like landscape with clocks that appear to be melting and ants on a bag or clock of some sort. The clocks represent time that is spent just melting away, while the ants depict decay and rotting away. I think that it overall symbolizes how time is just slowly being eaten away and the warm, desert landscape just helps to create that dry, ominous feeling. Dalí has done many interesting works, which is why I became so interested in his art when studying him in Spanish. Another of his paintings that we studied was like a picture of Abraham Lincoln and a picture of a naked woman combined into one. His surrealist style led to many neat, unique paintings. They challenge viewers to look at life from a little different perspective, one that is a bit more surreal. I think he’s a super interesting artist and his work really reveals this point.

Weisman Art Museum

Paul Shambroom has his Picturing Power exhibit at the Weisman Art Museum. Level A HAZMAT Suit, Yellow (“Disaster City? National Emergency Response and Rescue Training Center, Texas Engineering and Extension Service [TEEX], College Station, Texas), 2004 is a very long name for a picture of a man in a yellow HAZMAT suit in a picturesque forest. The picture was so powerful because it seems to show two opposites in the same spot. A pristine forest is usually associated with fresh air and peacefulness. However, the HAZMAT suit is usually designated for disasters and times of chaos, and putting the two together almost seems like it is some sort of abstract art, not a normal photograph. The context of the photograph is much different than the felling one gets from looking at the art. Because Paul has went around the country and has taken pictures of many law enforcement agencies and other ominous looking figures training in peaceful looking places the collection of the photos looks almost like the apocalypse. I think that he did a wonderful job on his exhibition, it is very colorful and it turns normal everyday sightings into another world.

Paradise and Purgatory

I was informed there were two different floors that had pieces, not sure if they were from the same exhibit. So I chose one from both floors.

The exhibit on the first floor was by Cheryl Wilgren Clyne. “Three that were you? was so beautiful and sweet. The model looked so peaceful and serene. The feather shapes added a nice soft texture, almost protecting and cradling the child. She used that same model in two other pieces as well.

The fourth floor had the ‘Paradise and Purgatory? exhibit. The piece that really caught my attention was ‘Ezekiel 1:5’ by Josie Lewis. The colors were very bright and beautiful. It was a smaller piece so it took a moment for me to notice that it was a very intricate collage of eyes that made up the shape of the fish. My interpretation would be leaning more towards paradise more than purgatory.

Paradise and Purgatory

“Two shades of Gray? by Fawnia Khan showed me the two sides of love. Two birds perched in opposite direction, both of them with beautiful, flowing tails. One tail was sparkly, smooth and a lighter shade of gray. The other tail was full, ruffled and a darker shade of gray.

“Love Martian? by Jeff Lohaus was awesome. I loved that he used the green tint. It was a nice small piece made out of aluminum cast that made me think of how hard love is to interpret or understand that it can almost seem alien. But maybe this Love Martian was like a cupid and helped people to fall in love.

Kuhr + Lyon + drawing

(William) Preston Dickerson
(American, 1891-1930)
STILL LIFE WITH VASE OF FLOWERS, 1929-1930
oil and graphite on cream woven paper

I really liked this piece. It was very vibrant and bright, but at the same time there was a lot of dark. I was struck by how modern it looked; especially considering it was made over half a century ago. The vase was an elegant blue that looks so realistic while still conveying its artists view. Though I don't know what kind of room the painting was set in, it had a warm, even comforting feeling, as though it was home. Outside the window there were other buildings as well. I think what I liked some much about this painting was what I'm hesitant to call timelessness, but have no better word for.

I Heart You

“Two shades of Gray? by Fawnia Khan showed me the two sides of love. Two birds perched in opposite direction, both of them with beautiful, flowing tails. One tail was sparkly, smooth and a lighter shade of gray. The other tail was full, ruffled and a darker shade of gray.

“Love Martian? by Jeff Lohaus was awesome. I loved that he used the green tint. It was a nice small piece made out of aluminum cast that made me think of how hard love is to interpret or understand that it can almost seem alien. But maybe this Love Martian was like a cupid and helped people to fall in love.

River to Infinity

The River to Infinity exhibit initially scared the hell out of me as the base boomed right when I walked in the door. Initially, I noticed the silver, reflective prisms in back. As the sound came, I noticed a video on the walls that was of prisms blowing up and on fire. It was really interesting to see the river made from silver material, but in back, the prisms were destroyed. I think the exhibit is dark with light shining on certain points of the reflective, silver metal in order to display just a little beauty. The exhibit represents that nothing is infinite and everything eventually gets destroyed. The horses are like those of the final ending of the Earth. It's interesting that they are on turn-tables like modern-day cars. Horses used to be a main form of transportation, but are rarely used now as they have been replaced by the car. They are headless to show that even the most holy, powerful things such as the ultimate horses can still be disfigured/destroyed. It's a very powerful exhibit.

Play With Fire

Metal Sculpture

The first day I came to class for Introduction to Time and Interactivity, I along with the rest of my class mates were locked out of the lab until Cheryl showed up; so, following the other students lead, I picked a spot on the benches to sit.
I happened to sit down next to Joseph Herrick’s piece, “Cleanliness is Godliness?. It was what appeared to be a metal impression of a mop head, with an actual wooden handle coming out of the top, and dirty liquid leaking from it onto and off of the white block it was set atop. It was simple to me, but very meaningful. The liquid was actually oil, which was poured onto the metal impression and ran off the white block. The way the oil was captured in the crevasses, gave it a some what more real life, or purposeful meaning.
Looking closer at the metal impression, I found that it was actually some sort of handbag or article of clothing that was wrapped around and fastened to the wooden pole. This art piece, for me, meant a political statement about the corruption of oil and how it stains everyone (meaning that the metal handbag impression symbolizes the material lifestyle of humans and it is covered with oil). At least that’s how I interpreted it. Great piece!

Bohemian Press

Bohemian Press

When I began walking through the Bohemian Press Exhibit, I was hard for me not to miss the giant tentacles that were attacking the surface of Paula Marty’s art series, “Space Invasion?. When first looking at it, I suppose these alien appendages where obviously the first thing that captured my eye; they shot out of the symmetrical black and white landscapes and ravaged the entire piece.
The second thing I focused on, was Marty’s ability to take black to an extreme level of darkness. Even more incredible was how she was able to make her white imprints so clean cut. You would expect there to be some flaw bordering that stark black background – perhaps a small stray sketch of white – but every line, shape, and curve set against the black surface – that I could see – was perfectly cut. Even small dots and scratches seemed strategically placed.
This piece is a must see for science fiction lovers and perfectionists alike.

Kuhr+Lyon+Drawing

This drawing struck me with its fine details. I noticed it from across the room and it looked to be a super-intricate drawing of a forest. Upon looking at it closely, I felt it was a ton of scribbly lines/dashes. The shading/shadowing was so perfect that it looked like a real forest. The distant trees are smaller and really look distant. The shades add a lot and I love that it is simply graphite and colorless. It's a contrast to this gallery, which has a lot of bright, extravagant colors!

Pennyodean

Michael Blomberg
'Pennyodean'
Earth, Fire, Wind, Water, Heart
2008

I love the reference to the bygone era of machines that would deliver an illusion of animation or three-dimensionality for a penny. I have seen a number of them in person and am very fascinated with them. The chalk in conjunction with the paint and other materials really capture the aesthetic of these machines. The penny slot is a great touch of realism that makes it seem as if this may be an actual pennyodean. The backlighting of the images looks great and the plastic lens lend an eerie fog that accentuates the dynamic of peering through a window. The crank works great and makes this piece even more interactive.
My only critique is that the stereoptic photos are placed backwards causing the dimensionality to be inverted. However, they still look 3d and most people could never tell. Bravo for exploring a neglected and beautiful medium with a rich history.

Biography

Hello! My name is Mike Ballard and this is my entire biography. I have lived the majority of my life in the notoriously dull area of the Iron Range – Virginia MN to be specific – until I made my escape, with my wife – fiancée then – in 2006. Saint Paul is currently my place of refuge.
I only remember one memory of myself as a baby and it was eating sand on a beach in Florida while feeding seagull’s cheeto’s – it was a family trip to Disney World.
I guess I wasn’t the smartest baby, but I think I figured it out; see my mom ate fish while she was pregnant with me, and apparently, the mercury in fish can decrease a child’s IQ… I don’t blame her though because I like fish too.
From my toddler days until early teens, I usually mark my memory timeline with injuries
I received at different ages: 3 years old, falling off the back of the family van and receiving four or five stitches in the back of my head; 4 or 5 years old, picking rocks on a trip out west, fell and punctured another hole in my forehead, receiving a couple of more stitches; 6 or 7 playing on monkey bars, fell again, broke my arm in two places; 9 or 10, basketball related accident causing a dislocated pinky; and the list goes on into my teens with two football related accidents resulting in a broken arm and another dislocated finger. Okay, so maybe I was never really that smart or cautious, but I think I recovered.
After a life of childhood injuries I became interested with music – which I never had an in injury in – and I played drums in the high-school concert, jazz, and marching band as well as in a little high-school band. The band I was in was called “Dynamic Sun? it was fun, but in most regards it was pretty lame.
After high-school, I decided to save some money by going to the community college in Virginia, and during that time, the film North Country was to be shot. Fortunately, I was able to get on with the production and work as a PA or gopher and that’s when I really started to get in to film. Since then I have been going to school for film here at the U.

Dear Marci... OXOX

Scholarship Art Gallery
Lauren Herzak-Bauman
Dear Marci… OXOX
Porcelain
2008

The piece is porcelain letters in a box. The letters are randomly scattered on the floor, completely out of order. I’m left with the question of what it means. It seems as though it’s a lost love perhaps, scattered across the floor, they look fragile and ripped. I can’t tell if these “letters? in the possession of the sender or the recipient. What is clear that there is a lot of feeling that is somewhat ambiguous. Some of the envelopes are still sealed. Are these the letters of lost love, or a love that has never been know. Despite my vague understanding, I love the strong feeling I get from it, in addition the visually appealing medium.

Natasha Hanson

I chose a piece that was by Natasha Hanson called Body Image vs Natural Beauty. The reason I chose this piece was because of how it related to me. There were many pictures of girls in bra and underwear with marker marking the spots on their body they were not comfortable with. In todays time, body image is everything. Keeping in shape, eating right, and many other things are just part of my daily life now. Magazines have such a huge influence on the way you judge people by the way they look or dress. You might say that person isn't cool because they do not the new style on. I give these girls credit for putting their bodies on display like that because I do not think I would be comfortable doing that.

Autobiography

From an early age. Joseph has been enticed and encouraged to engage in color, shape, texture to modify his environment to better conform to his fantasies. Joseph enjoys entertaining his senses with original and prefabricated stimuli. While Joseph appreciates the significance of all the arts & cultures, he strongly prefers fantastic, optical, experiential, exotic, harsh and intricate things.
He is skilled and/or talented in various forms or expression and technique: Guitar, Saxophone, Electronics, Drawing, Collage, Light Sculpture, Stereophotography, Darkroom, Video, Programming, etc.
He currently resides with his loving family in Golden Valley, MN, from which he buses to and fro to the University of Minnesota [Twin Cities]. He has declared no major, but intends on Architecture. He enjoys all his classes and intends to earn good marks.

To create different effects to your image, I found the options under filter very useful. You can create images that look like they have been done in colored pencil is an example.

Scholarship Exhibition

I chose a piece by Sarah Christianson called Christianson Homestead. There were three different black and white photographs of three different homesteads. I know it seems very random why I would choose something so plain out of all the other pieces in the gallery. The reason I chose this particular piece was because of the location of the pictures. My dad was born and raised in Hillsboro, ND, which is where one of the pictures is taken. It also has significance because I do know a group of Christiansons from up there. It brought back memories of playing with my grandma and grandpa at their homestead. We also have pictures just like that in my house of my dad's homestead. I really enjoyed this piece because of the memories it brought back to me.

Spiritual Suspense

Christine Lenzen
"Gravity"

This photo series explores the tradition and art of body suspension through dramatic and well-lit b&w photos. After seeing this photo series, I want to see similar photos in color. Many of the photographs have blood and I imagine this contrast of the silver hooks, rubbery flesh and thick blood would be quite incredible. The b&w works to nearly eliminating the 'gross-out factor' and invite the straight and narrow to investigate and appreciate body suspension without being disgusted and turned off by vivid blood, metal and flesh. She discusses the historical and present significance of body suspension in reaching new levels of consciousness and exploring one's own body. Her artist statement does a great job of informing viewers of the history and meaning behind the unusual photographs.
My only aesthetic suggestion and critique is that she did not explore many of the angles and composition possibilities. I feel that she could have also represented and alluded to the experience of body suspension in her photographs rather than merely presenting images of body suspension.

autobiographical image.psd

Tectonic Industries

Franklin Art Works was showing three artists exhibitions. One of which was Tectonic Industries: The desire to stay versus the inevitability of change (2008). It consisted of sixteen television sets (eight in a row on each side of the room) all showing people at home, either on their couch or on their bed. When I first walked in, the televisions were all paused and it just looked like still frames of people watching television, which I thought was just as interesting as when the film was played. This could have been because the two sides of televisions were a playing out of sync. Instead of the people having conversations, they were talking at the same time, than were silent at the same time. However, I thought that the idea was pretty cool and it was interesting to watch.

Culturing Technology

The piece by Allison Snopek, which was untitled, brought my attention in and captured me due to its colors. It looked like a big, swirly rainbow. I thought the rainbow seemed bright, cheerful, and fun. The next thing I noticed were the greenish-brown continents. They were the typical colors used to represent "ground." The piece included lines, as well, like those of latitude and longitude. I guessed it to resemble an Earth or globe. The continents, though, were spread differently than they are today. It reminded me of one of those maps of the "super continent," Pangea. Except in Elementary school we looked at different stages from Pangea until today and it reminded me of a stage closer to today as they're split apart, but not as much as today. I wondered if this resembled a past Earth stage, or perhaps a future stage. A stage where the Earth is like a rainbow, happy, peaceful, and fun. That's the interpretation I liked best.

River to Infinity

The Minneapolis Institute of was showcasing Andrea Stanislav’s Art River to Infinity - the Vanishing Points (2008). The main piece of art was mixed media with sound, video and art work with a lot of mirrors. When walking out into the piece looking down into the “river? of mirrors, there was the effect that it went down into infinity because of the mirrors overhead. With the bright light of explosions being played on the video, the depth that was conveyed was striking. The next room had two headless horses that were made out of glass. The room was filled with mirrors and light reflections; it was quite an experience for the eyes. The horses had shrapnel like things protruding from their sides. I latter found the heads for the horses behind the fallen towers in the first exhibit. I could not quite figure the exhibit out, but it was fun to look at.

Katherine E. Nash Exhibit

The artwork I chose to respond to in the Katherine E. Nash Gallery was
Elizabeth Erickson’s Hildegard’s Home, 1998-1999. It is a mixed media piece
that is displayed on three large pieces of paper that are vertical from one
another. Although it says it is made using mixed media, it resembles an
abstract acrylic painting. It could just look like that to me though
because I did a lot of paintings like this over the summer. The artwork
uses mostly greens, blues, and violets throughout the piece. There are two
areas, a square and rectangle that have yellow and orange in it. I like
these two spots because it makes the viewer wonder why they are there and
if they have a special meaning. Throughout the work Erickson used angled
scratch marks with the colors. These help the colors blend together and
create a unique look. The artwork is a museum purchase in memory of Audrey
M. Runyan with funds from her family and friends. This is the main reason I
decided to choose this piece. I think it is very important when family and
friends show their support. I also think it is very important to have that
information up, otherwise viewers would never know. Having that information
allows the viewers to think harder about symbolism, and question what parts
of the piece relate to Audrey M. Runyan. Once I read that it was in memory
of someone, my eyes immediately went to the yellow and orange spots. I
think for everyone a piece like this can hold many different meanings for
everyone, and that is the reason why I like abstract artwork so much.

M.C. Escher

waterfall
M.C. Escher
"Waterfall"
1961

I began wondering about what artist I could do this little write-up assignment about when all of a sudden I had a mini-flashback to high school and remembered one of the artist who's work I was just amazed with - M.C. Escher. Let me say that in high school (possibly during the same time while I had art class) I took several architecture classes, so I really enjoyed working with things like point-of-view and putting together drawings that represented real life. But that is what I find SO mind-boggling about his drawings, because even though they appear to be representing a fairly real life image such as the building in "Ascending and Descending" in all actuality when you look closer they are completely impossible architechtual feats. Whether it be people simultaneously constantly walking up stairs one direction and at the same time continuously down on the same set of stairs ("Ascending and Descending") or a waterfall that falls out of and lands in at the same level ("Waterfall"), M.C. Escher has drawn so many interesting, illusion-type things that I simply admire for their attention to detail and creative qualities. Another one of my favorite works of his is "Relativity" because if you just focus on a certain spot within the whole image there is absolutely nothing strange about it, they all seem to be fine and normal portrayals of someone interacting with the house. But when you step back and look at the whole scene you realize its just a twisted maze of different scenes that SOMEHOW all tie-together and work, you literally can turn the image 90 degrees in any direction and find normal reference points and it seems normal when in all reality its an abstract combination that is a complete optical illusion. I guess that is just my main interest with Escher, is his ability to visualize and capture these completely incomprehensible realities and make them appear (at least at first glance) to be just that - reality.

Robert Longo
Max 2002
Lithography on Paper

I was immediately drawn to this piece just by its shear size. I’m not sure if this is suppose to be someone in specific but it is a wonderfully done piece. It has a sort of a 1940’s era feel to it with the man having a flattop hat and his style of suit. I like the presence it has, which is dramatically done by the fact it colorless and its vast size. The facets of the suit and his face are very well done. This piece has some mystery to it because of its monotonous lines. I stood in front of the piece for quite a while, questioning and trying to rationalize whom it could be. Also, I wondered how one would create a piece of its size. It would be really interesting to how it came to be.

Chambers

The Chambers Hotel was filled with very unique and inspiring pieces of art. My personal favorite piece has been regarded as trash and people have tried to rid of it. However, this has more to do with its appearance, and not its quality. “Pile? created by Gavin Turk (2004) is a bronze statue that is concealed in several black plastic garbage bags. They are arranged is such a way that the exhibit looks more like mess than art. This piece makes me wonder how much renowned work one has to do before their artistic right of passage. What I am saying is that a wonderful piece like that (worth real money) would be disregarded if it was my first work, but a masterpiece if someone else made it. Overall, I really thought that the idea was great. Whoever walks by the piece can’t but help but be drawn to it. The tour guide said that people who have had parties there have complained about it, but then proclaim their love to it after they find out it was supposed to be there. I think that this is kind of a funny response. It is so opposite from conventional art that it fits in perfectly with the collection at the hotel.

Walker Art Center 3

This interactive, visual art sponsored by Best Buy really got me hooked. I was perplexed and intrigued at the same time. All I saw was a visual of a dolphin that kind of moved around, so I immediately assumed it was a video. Sitting down, though, there was a keyboard. I didn't want to touch it since I thought it was a part of the art. As I walked by again, I noticed someone typing on the keyboard. The keyboard was a means of "communicating" with the dolphin. You can type a question and it will respond. I didn't know if there was someone on the other side or somewhere responding to questions, or what. It seemed unlikely, but this is what intrigued me. It was a visual, digital form of a dolphin and it communicated with you... how cool!

Cleanliness is Godliness

Joseph Herrick
Cleanliness is Godliness

Joseph’s piece is an interesting interpretation of the phrase “cleanliness is godliness? where he chooses to make his commentary by creating a mop. The piece is composed of a wooden handle with the mopping end made of iron. The iron portion is covered with oil paint making the mop look dark and dirty; there is also oil covering the mop as well as smeared across its base and onto the floor. This mop appears to be doing exactly the opposite of its intended purpose, which seems to say that it is irrational to try to keep everything pristine and perfect, or that godliness is intangible.

Bohemian Press Review

B. Sanford Borlaug
Six Devastator Bullets for Iris

Borlaug’s print is an interesting mix of cultural and political images that attempts to convey a message. The print is mainly composed of bland colors that creates a pretty bleak scene. The foreground however uses a pallet of red, orange, and yellow that resembles an atomic bomb blast. Underneath the mushroom could there are the outlines of several figures, one of which is former president Ronald Regan, another appears to be GW Bush. On one side there is a car with people standing around, and on the other a man holding a military grade weapon, underneath him there are several figures huddled over a dead body. The composition of these figures appears to represent capitalist conservative, which makes the image of the bomb blast a significant commentary on these other images.

Katherine Nash Exhibit

I am a person who does not know very much about art but when I first walked into the Katherine Nash Art Exhibit I was amazed by all the beautiful pieces. It was so hard to find just one that stuck out to me. They all displayed different colors and techniques. I am sure every piece has its own story behind it. This exhibit was so interesting and unique because it seemed to be simple but yet so complex! The reason I say this is because it doesn't appear to have very much effort put into it but then when you look closer and see every detail, you realize how hard it is to come up with this idea, and then to make it into a piece of art! This exhibit had many unique and beautiful pieces that I will always remember because of the hard work put into it.

Autobiography

Growing up my neighborhood on Old Sturbridge Road in Corcoran, MN was filled with well-intentioned men of the upper middle class variety. Now a bygone phenomenon, these men with their carefully groomed mustaches and monogrammed briefcases were known unashamedly as weekend fathers. During the week these men toiled over complicated briefs in big city offices or flying over the friendly skies, often arriving home in the stillness of the suburban night to find Jell-O congealing in the fridge and the wife and kids in bed. The weekends were when they made their presence known. Percolating Folgers would fuse with burnt wheat toast and the smell would rouse even the most reluctant sleepyheads out of bed.

The Sturbridge wives and mothers as I remember them made Kool-Aid, burned ticks off of white knee socks and went to craft fairs. By all accounts it was a fairly idyllic childhood, sans the divorce of my parents (3.25 years in the bloody making) and my unremarkable stint on the high school stage as “Rose? in God’s Favorite (possibly playwright Neil Simon’s one and only unknown production).

Yet even amongst the soothing backdrop of unfinished basements and grainy glasses of Tang I yearned for something more, which led me to eventually (a), start college and then stop; work a series of jobs with varying degrees of enthusiasm and then start college up again, (b), find myself working for the University and liking it and (c), begin contemplating the possibility of graduate school to pursue an MFA in creative writing after I’m awarded my BA in the spring. So now any past ambivalence towards my future has been replaced by a resolution to act and to realize my goals in what can only be described as a blissfully sleep-deprived stupor. Ah, hope. Coffee. Cigarettes.

bohemian press

Spark Exhibition

"Hypnica" 2007.
Paul Marinis.

A talking metronome uses the voice of a hypnotist synchronized to lull active listeners into a sonic trance. At first I did not like this piece, a electronic rock group was blaring noises at the Spark Party, so I did not have the proper environment to appreciate this piece. However, finding a quiet moment in the evening this weekend in the vicinity of the piece, I decided to give it another try. The synchronized pacing of the voice and metronome clicks were very entrancing. The loop is long and circular, allowing the listeners to remain for many minutes without noticing any repetition.

I had a very good discussion with the artist. We share many of the same interests and ideologies in technology and art, and it was a true pleasure to have an intelligent and informed conversation of past, present and potential projects. We had a wonderful exchange about the psychological, aesthetic and technological implications of stereoptic video and photography. I rarely meet like-minded artists, (especially established ones, Marinis teaches at Stanford), with a similar interest, humor and technology of art.

Walker Art Center 2

This piece from the sculpture garden didn't initially strike me as an octopus. At first glance, it seemed like a fish and as I circled around it, it began to remind me of a puzzle piece. Following that and circling farther, I noticed more of a bird-like resemblance. Still not sure what to think, I looked at the name of the piece and saw it was "Octopus" by Alexander Calder. Being all black, with little details beyond bolts and sculpting work, I thought it was hard to tell what it truly was, so I guess I learned that an octopus is kind of a puzzle piece, bird, and fish all in one! It really enforced in me that art can be anything you want it to be, and any level of abstractness.

Play With Fire

The iron sculpture exhibit had many interesting pieces to show. However, the piece that caught my attention was Untitled, Bronze 2007, by Mark Biedrzycki. At first I thought it looked like a bronze heart with tubes coming in and out of it. Upon closer inspection I saw that it was a collection of faces making up the shape and the tubes were coming from the mouths of the figures into other ones. It made me think that body parts are really pieces of each person and not like a piece of hardware that fits in a big machine to make a human. Also, it can show that the heart is more than just an organ that pumps your blood, it gives you personality.

Playing with Fire

"Phalluses of fine art" by Joseph Herrick

Having taken a metal casting class I must say that I'm impressed with
Herrick's ability to make a pitcher. It's pretty difficult and any number of
things could go wrong. It looks like the pitcher thats lying down did have
something go wrong. The cracks and holes looks like it was poured too cold.
I'm not sure about the title. I really didnt think about penises until I read
the title. I thought they just looked like nice pitchers that were well done.
Now I can't not think about penises when I see them. It ruins it for me.

Unofficial auto-bio

Hello this is Andrew Somers and welcome to my blog, it is probably pretty lame, but if you are not part of my family or in my class then nuts to you – deal with it. I was born in San Diego, California lived there for a solid two days before moving back to Minnesota and I’ve lived here ever since. I grew up with a pretty normal life as a white, Christian, middle class, suburban, heterosexual, male. Fortunately I feel that I’ve done a fair job breaking free of those weapons of privilege, but I’m still on the path to becoming myself. For me this means having an open mind and making the best of what this crazy life throws at me. I now go the University of Minnesota, and I’m studying International Studies with a focus on human rights, and social justice. I’m taking this class about time based art, and part of the class is to make a blog and the first post is a bio of ourselves – that pretty much brings us up to the present. So enjoy what you see here, or don’t, but take from it what you may…

bohemian art

I enjoy my Bohemian lifestyle and love folk music. Some of the artists I enjoy are Joni Mitchell, Michelle Shocked, Nanci Griffith, James Taylor, CSNY, and Paul Simon. I was lucky enough to see Simon and Garfunkel in Atlanta on a tour they did after Central Park. Though I had to wait I hour before they came out, the concert was wonderful. Actually, as much as I love art, the first time I heard about Rene Magritte was from a song by Paul Simon called "Rene and Georgette Magritte and Their Dog After the War". Then, when I finally saw a Magritte painting, I was hooked on his work, and that is one of his works in the upper right hand corner. I think the picture is beautiful. People tend to judge each other by their looks and sometimes never get to know another because of this. It is human nature, but perhaps Rene Magritte was trying to illustrate that old cliche term, "love is blind". What do you think?

Autobiography

My name is Alyssa Hoerl and I’m a sophomore at the University of Minnesota.
I’m an art major and I spend most of my time painting. I grew up in
Rochester, Minnesota and consider myself a true Minnesotan because I
absolutely love fishing, camping, and skiing. My favorite style of music is
jam bands and I spend my free time and money going to music festivals. I
collect anything with hearts on it as well as martini glasses. My family is
the most important thing to me and I absolutely love spending as much time
as I can with them. My brother, Alex, lives in St. Paul and my father,
Bryan, is selling his house to move up here to be closer to us. I love the
Minneapolis area, but when I graduate I plan to move to California to live
with my best friend, Marisa. She is currently living there with her fiancé
and attending college in San Diego. Other than that I don’t know what I
want to do after I graduate but I’m excited for whatever the future brings.

autobiography

Patient #: 3319057: Daniel J. Juola (danzorz)

Born: 07-28-1985

Grew up in a suburb of Minneapolis; family: Both parents, older brother,
younger sister; attended public school, continuing at the University of
Minnesota - Political Science, History degree

Political- member of the Minnesota Public Interest Research Group;
volunteered for several local political campaigns; seeking acceptance law
school

Technology- expertise in personal computers, especially hardware as well as
limited knowledge in software

Artistic- musician with proficiency of seven different instruments; partial
to alternative rock, as well as moderate classical and jazz influences; deep
interest in cartoons and animation, mostly in those with mature humor and
themes, but additionally historic animation and the progression of artists,
voice actors, and writers.

Personality- extrovert, talkative and otherwise friendly, but contrasted
with occasional introvert episodes; wry demeanor combined with a quick wit;
genuine concern for others and the world surrounding him

Reason for entry- completely broken spirit from excessive composition of
papers; became sick monotony of school

tectonic industries

Tectonic industries: The desire to stay versus the inevitability of change, 2008
Helen Stringfellow, Lars Jerlach, cinematography by Evan Drolet Cook
Franklin Art Works

16 monitors, 8 on the right face 8 on the left, all playing different scenes. Most have one person sitting on a couch or kitchen table. They could be watching television or maybe sitting across from someone else. One woman sitting at the kitchen table is reading a book.

When I walked in I was the only one in the gallery so I walked passed each one and stood in the center. At first I thought each monitor represented separate individual scenes, but as I listened to the people on the monitors speak, I realized that it was actually a dialogue/conversation. The lady on the first monitor on the right kept nagging, “finish your lunch?, “finish your drink?, and the man on the fourth monitor kept responding to her in a annoyed manner. Most of the phrases spoken by them were about “seagulls? and “birds?.

I felt like watching a performance in an inverted theatre-in-the-round. Instead of having the stage in the center with audience seated all around, I felt like I, the audience member was in the center, surrounded by the “players? in each monitor. I could never tell who was going to speak up next, so I kept walking back and forth from one monitor to another. My favorite monitors were the ones that included pets. There was a guy drinking beer on the couch with two big dogs sharing the couch with him. And my favorite moment was when the black and white dog tried to get his beer! Haha… then there were cute cats in couple of them too. One cat sat on an empty couch with its back turned, completely oblivious of the camera.

After reading the provided information, I find out that this video installation is a full 119 minutes in length. I’m not sure where it begins and ends or if it just keeps going and going. I also learned that this work is about the Alfred Hitchcock movie, “The Birds?. I’ve seen that movie a long time ago, as a kid, but, without being told, I would not have figured out that the “birds? being talked about was from that movie.

I enjoyed this installation on a real simple level of just watching people in their homes spending time on the couch. It made me feel like a voyeur, as if I was watching security surveillance tapes. But any deeper interpretation in regards to the title of the work is way beyond my comprehension I’m afraid. I’m starting to feel that maybe I have a very lazy mind regarding certain types of artwork that requires me to thin :P

Playing With Fire

I chose Joseph T. Kelly III’s Iraqi War Memorial Proposal for my artwork
choice. The piece was made out of bronze in 2007. I chose this piece over
the rest for two main reasons. My first reason is because I like political
art pieces. I like them because most people have a response to them. This
is mainly because most people know what’s going on in the world and it
always becomes an opinionated topic. The other reason I chose this piece is
because there is water that spouts from the top, which caught my attention.
The artwork’s base looks like a bucket of some sort that is holding a lot
of human skulls. In the center of the skull pile is a cubic cylinder that
resembles the Washington Monument. On top of the cubic shape is where the
water pours out and then trickles down the cylinder to the skulls. The
title of the piece shows that the artist wants it to be a proposal for the
Iraqi war that is currently going on. I think it is a good idea and I like
that artists are already thinking about a memorial for it. However, I don’t
know how some people are going to take all the human skulls since this was
such a debatable war in the first place.

Autobiography

I am a Korean American and very proud of my heritage. Learning about my own culture and trying to incorporate it into my daily life is very important to me. Besides being involved in my own heritage, I love learning about other’s attitudes. Whether it is through art, music, literature, religion I enjoy it all. I believe myself to be very open-minded and open to trying new things. Ideally, I hope to have a career that will allow me to travel and absorb all there is to absorb.
Currently I am focused on finding the right path to travel. I have traveled down some paths that have lead me to feel lost, so I turn around and start over. I am in no rush. I am strolling down these new courses, not running. Enjoying life is of much importance to me. Life is too short to let it slip between my fingers. That is why I am a person that lives day to day. Not to say I don’t set future goals, but I tend to set my goals to more broad, allowing room to stray from time to time.

BRIEF Summary of Me...up to this point

Well...to start it off, my name is Brooks Jacob Albrecht. I was
born on August 12th, 1987 in my hometown of Hutchinson, Minnesota (located
just over an hour west of Minneapolis on Highway 7). Before coming to the U
of M, I spent my all my years in Hutch (lovingly known as “H-Town? by the
natives I guess...I agree, it does sound dumb). I come from a family of
four, made up of my mom (Becky), dad (Tim), and younger brother (Brian,
18). My mom works in Human Resources at Hutchinson Technology Inc. in town,
my dad runs a small dairy farm at our place (which is now surrounded by
houses because we're basically now in town), and my brother is a senior
this year at good old HHS. As far as myself, I am a sophomore at the U and
I guess the first thing that people seem to attach to me is that I am an
athlete. I played football, basketball, and baseball in high school. I had
tons of fun growing up playing sports and am happy to tell people that. But
at the same time, it doesn't define who I am. Thats why I am at times
tentative to tell other students that I play baseball here for the
University because there are definitely people out there who have their
perceptions of what I am going to be like being an athlete at a big school
like this. I'm even more hesitant to tell people that last year I played
football here at the U because people have even worse generalities about
Division I football players (but thankfully I found out it wasn't for me
before their 1-11 season, yikes!). Other than my sports side, I am pretty
laid back and enjoy listening to almost all kinds of music (or at least
giving them a try), watching movies, and “dabbling? with computers.

Constructive Criticism

When I went to this exhibit, I did not realize that all the pieces were done by local youth. It was a great opportunity for them to benefit from this exhibit. I was amazing by how talented the youth around here is! I chose the piece Chango Divine. This piece of artwork really stood out to me because of the issues their are in Minneapolis. It showed a dark and dreary skyline of Minneapolis. It appeared to show the crime and violence that occurs at night. While on the other hand their were doves above the skyline with a hand reaching out to the word love. It seemed to show the difference between many people in Minneapolis. You have those who cause these crimes and the dark things of Minneapolis, while you also see there is a good side of Minneapolis and that people do care about the world!

play with fire

unknown author - sculpture at the end of the bench

This sculpture is perhaps the essence of what the exhibition is about.
Entirely made of metal, it emulates elements of nature, and contorts the
dead to resemble life. A metal bird perches atop a corpse of recycled metal
consuming the innards of screws and bolts. While the bird itself is shaped
realistically, the carcass is not; it's a mess of man-made parts being
devoured (used) by the bird (life). The parts taken are made into something
new, just as the artwork in the exhibition is taken and recycled into art.

Playing With Fire

The piece I chose to write about from the “Didn't Your Mother Teach You Not to Play with Fire?? exhibition is “Cleanliness is Godliness? by Joseph Herrick. The piece is a beautifully constructed and realistic looking mop made of iron leaving a trail of dirty water behind it. How I interpreted the piece was that, as we move along in our lives, we mess up and sin and that resembles the dirty water. When we ask God for forgiveness, however, all that dirty water can be washed clean due to his grace. I enjoyed how the piece gives a feel of movement just like our lives are continually moving.

Walker Art Center

The piece I observed included many aspects found in everyday life all thrown around and in the air as if in a tornado. It reminded me of the Wizard of Oz as everything was blown into the air. There was a box of died with bleach, a frog that says "kiss me," a Mary (mother of Jesus) figurine, glad bags, and even parts of houses, signs, and billboards. The title, Same Day Delivery indicates a face-paced, "need it now" society or lifestyle that we as humans have grown to live in. Everything flying around shows motion. I especially like how realistic everything looks with logos, angles, things being upside-down, shadows, and more. It really stuck out.

Playing with Fire

Although I did take a look at all of the pieces on display from the iron pour, it did not take much thought at all to pick my favorite. “Teuithis (Squid)? by Timothy Kraus caught my eye right away because I’ve always liked squid and octopus and things with tentacles. I’ve spent plenty of time gutting boxes of squid in my mom’s kitchen, beheading them with my thumb and getting ink squirts on the backsplash and my shirt.
I like animals in art also. The tentacles always make for interesting texture, both visually and tactilely. I’ve uses tentacle motif in my art, including teapots, printmaking, beading, and sewing, so anytime I see it in other’s artwork, I tend to notice. I only counted 8 tentacles though. and squid have 10, but whatever, I didn’t really care if it was anatomically correct. there were teeth and stuff too. I liked that the artist abstracted the squid into a monster. I like the unpolished surface of the iron too. all the different natural colors and textures on the surface is pretty cool.

Playing with Fire

TBA

Biography - A short history

At the time this was written, Michael Blomberg was 24 years 4 months 26 days
12 hours 7 minutes and 19 seconds old. Michael has lived the majority of his
life in a big red house that has a shape similar to a barn. This might
explain his fascination with cows as a child. On October 31st at the age of
9, Michael watched a film on the television with his parents and two
siblings. In this film a bloody disembodied head rolled into a kids bedroom
and up under his sheets. To this day Michael can't sleep with the covers
hanging over the side of the bed. In the summer of 1995, Michael went on a
hot air balloon ride in Arizona with his best friend at the time. While
conducting the landing procedure the pilot had to pull up in order to dodge
an abandoned couch left in the desert. The second attempt at landing the
balloon came down too fast and hard and the balloon crashed. Michael enjoyed
the experience and would like to try it again before he dies. At the age of
17, Michael's first real girlfriend asked him to betray his good friend.
Michael reluctantly did for fear of losing the girl. This is Michaels one
greatest regret in life. A portion of Michael's college life was spent being
goth. he learned how to club dance at a goth bondage club with some of his
friends. At about the same time Michael joined a dance team that specialized
in a Japanese club dance. The team performed numerous times at various places
for a few years. The team broke up due to the graduation of key members.
Michael still enjoys indulging in his goth side and looks back with fondness
at his time as a dancer.

Autobiography

TBA

Autobiography

Hi there! My name is Molly Ingeman. I currently attend the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities for Health and Wellness and would like to become a Physician's Assistant. I grew up in a small town in the northwest corner of Minnesota. I have played many sports in my life and enjoy watching and playing almost all sports! My family consists of an older brother, older sister, and then my two parents. We also have a dog which I love so much! She is the best cuddler ever! I have worked as a teller at a bank for 5 years which I love! I also nanny here in the cities for two great boys who are 1 and 3 years old. They are the best kids ever! I love living in the cities because there is always something to do and I have met some great people here!

chambers hotel

will cotton
b. 1965 mass.
candy stick forest 2005
oil on linen

i found the candy cane painting extremely compelling. i'm not sure if it was the bright colors, or the theme itself, but it struck a chord within me. there is a nude woman sitting on a fallen "tree" in a forrest of brightly colored candy canes. the way the paint shimmers also works really well with the painting. the bright paints have a glossy look, giving it a sticky, sugary sort of appeal. even though the setting is so whimsical, it has a very real appeal, as if it were a real place, that somebody could actually go. everything about this painting is just fantastic

Autobiography

My name is Dustin Ludwikowski from Eau Claire, Wisconsin. I am a freshman majoring in Biology with a minor in Spanish. My favorite sport is water skiing. I’m on a show skiing team called the Ski Sprites. I’ve been doing that for 9 years. I love all sorts of movies and music as well as books. I love penguins, inside jokes, Italian food, and friends. I’m pretty close to my family which includes my parents, one sister who’s older than me, and my dog, Scout as well as my cat, Tobi. I hope to be a teacher when I graduate. I try to have no regrets and live life as it comes. I believe everything happens for a reason. I like to think deep and stimulate my brain, but probably don’t do enough of it. That’s a lot of the surface-based stuff about me; anything deeper will come through getting to know me.

bohemian art

I enjoy my Bohemian lifestyle and love folk music. Some of the artists I enjoy are Joni Mitchell, Michelle Shocked, Nanci Griffith, James Taylor, CSNY, and Paul Simon. I was lucky enough to see Simon and Garfunkel in Atlanta on a tour they did after Central Park. Though I had to wait I hour before they came out, the concert was wonderful. Actually, as much as I love art, the first time I heard about Rene Magritte was from a song by Paul Simon called "Rene and Georgette Magritte and Their Dog After the War". Then, when I finally saw a Magritte painting, I was hooked on his work, and that is one of his works in the upper right hand corner. I think the picture is beautiful. People tend to judge each other by their looks and sometimes never get to know another because of this. It is human nature, but perhaps Rene Magritte was trying to illustrate that old cliche term, "love is blind". What do you think?

Playing with Fire

Fawzia Khan
Safe
Aluminum, bronze, barbed wire

This piece grabbed my attention initially by the way it was displayed. I saw from a distance three metal, sharp objects hanging down. I thought them to be just coiled, metal balls hanging from the ceiling; but with a closer look I noticed that they were birds’ nests. Within the nests I saw the presence of birds, which gives the somewhat harsh piece a more calming feeling. The title of the piece explains it all, it is perfect for the piece. The birds within these sharp barbed wired nests do indeed look safe. I really enjoyed how the three nests have been hung from the ceiling, rather than being displayed on a stand. It adds so much more relevance to it.

Autobiography

Selma got adopted yesterday. She was one of the rabbits up for adoption at the West St. Paul Petco adoption event on Sunday. She had been fostered by my friend, Alicia, who also has 3 more bunnies of her own.
Alicia and Selma picked me up in their car and I sat shotgun with Selma in my lap, well, more sprawls across my chest. She is a big bunny; much bigger than my bunny Maurice. She was so sweet, she licked my neck and crawl up to the shoulder, then she fell behind me so unbuckled my seatbelt and she fell down and sat on the seat…she stole my seat! So I ended up sitting/kneeling on the passenger side floor while Selma sat in the seat. oh well.
She was wearing this harness and matching leash that had formerly belonged to my late bunny, Timmy. when we got to Petco, I let her walk around and of course she attracted attention from the customers. Two little girls came to pet her and her parents came to ask about her. I think the dad totally wanted her, though his wife didn’t seem to feel the same…
IMG_7993blog.jpg
well, Selma went on some dates with potential suitors and then there was Caerbannog the little polka dotted Rex boy. They hit it off. The couple adopted Selma! yay. I’m so happy for her. but I was sorta sad to say good bye to her…
I took some pictures…
IMG_7998blog.jpg

Playing With Fire

I chose a piece of artwork named Iraq War Memorial Proposal by Joseph T. Kelly III. This sculpture was a monument which had skulls and bodies on the bottom of the monument. To me it represented the deaths of all the innocent victims and the terrorists caused by the Iraqi War. This sculpture was also a water fountain. The water seemed to be cleaning the bodies away of any sins they may have committed. This piece attracted me because of the recent times we have had with Iraq and how it has affected everyone in our nation.

Iraq War Memorial Proposal

Of the sculptures from the “Didn't Your Mother Teach You Not to
Play With Fire?? exhibit, I ended up looking at the “Iraq War Memorial
Proposal? sculpture done by Joseph T. Kelly III. I guess I was immediately
drawn to it because of the fact that it had running water seemingly
overflowing from the top of a Washington-Monument-like structure in the
center. The water would come out the top and run down the sides of the
structure in a large bowl of sorts. The dramatic aspect of the work of art
was how this bowl was filled with hundreds of bronze tiny, quarter-sized
skulls surrounding the structure. Obviously the skulls are there to
represent the many lives that have been lost on all sides during the Iraq
war. I feel like the art is supposed to make the viewer think about the
whole war situation and all of that goes into that whole discussion,
because in the end there would never be an official government-sanctioned
memorial of any kind relating to the Iraq war that had things like hundreds
of skulls seemingly surrounding one of the most recognizable patriotic
structures for the U.S. It has to be a form of protest and I respect that
the artist utilized his artistic abilities to go about sending a message in
a less-than-typical way.

Autobiography

My name is Craig and I am originally from Ashland Wisconsin (way up on the freezing shores of Lake Superior). I plan on graduating this spring and going on to occupational therapy school in the fall. I want to move but I have no idea where I want to live after I graduate. Preferably some place with little to no winter. I would like to go traveling for a while to see some countryside and scope out some of my options. Anyway, I have not made my own art since I was in school and eleven years old, but I will try to overcome my inexperience (fears) with an open-mind and hopefully be able to create something.

Biography

TBA

Autobiography

Since everything in my life revolves around sports (Job, hobbies, free time) it has become a parallel to a game itself. There are so many realities in sports that emulate people's lives that this should surprise no one. As cliche as it may be, we all play the game of life. For me, life is like a game of baseball in the top of the third inning. So far enough has happened where I can see what I need to do to win, but nowhere nearly enough to see the final score. I know that I’m leading my opponent, but not by enough to be comfortable. That’s why nothing gets taken for granted. No lead, no time, nothing. Everything so far has put me where I am and cannot be changed. Like giving up a homerun, the past must be forgotten for the future to be successful.

Playing With Fire

Untitled by: Joe Gilbertson [Bronze, Cedar 2006]
This sculpture shows eight birds standing on a shelf. With holes for eyes, they look to be dead or demonic. These eyes also sort of follow you similar to the Mona Lisa. Their stick-double legs also look very sharp and straight, seemingly unfriendly. The shelf they’re on is completely black-painted wood. It seems like it could be showing tendencies of people in the world today to show off dark, cold displays that may be similar to their personalities. It could also be displaying cruelty to birds, as they are on display similar to deer heads.

Autobiography

I find writing about myself quite a challenge because I don’t like talking about myself; rather, I’m more of a listener. Since I have been so fortunate, I feel it’s important for me to give my time to others. I have been so blessed with a wonderful family and the greatest friends anyone could ever ask for. I am the way I am today because of them.
I am an extremely optimistic person in most cases and I always try to look on the brighter side of things. My optimistic personality is due to my love for Jesus Christ and my faith in the plan He has for me. My faith is the base of my life and plays a major role in the decisions I make. My faith is also the reason why I love volunteering and helping others. I have done a lot of hands on work in impoverished areas and those trips have been some of my greatest experiences. I take pleasure in spending time outdoors doing anything. Camping, hiking, rafting, and canoeing are just some of the activities I adore doing.
I enjoy spending time with friends and creating new relationships. Sports, which are a passion of mine, allow me to do so. I love to play pretty much any sport but my favorites would have to be basketball and soccer. I am a thrill seeker and I am not afraid to try new activities. When it comes to new situations, however, I am not so confident. I am very shy and reserved when thrown into unfamiliar circumstances.
The aspect I love about art is that it allows you to escape and let out all your bundled-up emotions. Art is my therapy session; my one on one time, and that’s why I love it so much.

bohemian art

wow

bohemian art

wow

Spark Exhibition

At Spark, a festival of electronic music and arts, Ali Momeni’s 2008 Timing is Everything artwork captured my attention. The work was displayed on the floor behind the staircase at the West Bank Arts Quarter. The piece consists of about 31 light bulbs connected to wires that are arranged in a cluttered line. There are two speakers that play what sounds to be a miscellaneous note scheme to the right and left of the light bulb arrangement. For every note that is played a light bulb lights up. The idea behind the piece is clever and the title brings it to another level. It makes me question the artist’s reasoning. I’m not exactly sure what she is trying to say by the title, but maybe that is what she wants. Maybe her goal was for it to have multiple meanings. I also question the one light bulb that is larger than the rest. It could be there for an electronical purpose or it could hold a symbolic meaning. Overall, I like Ali Momeni’s work of art and think Spark is a unique addition to the West Bank Arts Quarter.

Paradise and Purgatory

The piece I found was titled by a bible verse. Ezekial 1:5 and as I looked, behold, four heavenly creatures, and they had a wheel within a wheel, and their rims were full of eyes round about. By: Josie Lewis, cut paper, 2008. I thought it really neat that Josie chose to model a piece of art after a bible verse. I also really like the use of cut paper as a media for art. The entire piece is an eye, but it's made up of many small, cut, pieces of paper, which each have eyes on them. I like the blues, teals, and greens used with skin tones to make the eye realistic, but decorative. It relates well to the theme of the exhibit, Paradise and Purgatory, because it's symbolizing eyes of God, a wheel of eyes, that's always watching in order to judge: will it be paradise, or will it be purgatory?

Bohemian Press

The Maximum Occupancy Sign:

Among the prints is a mandatory sign, establishing the occupancy. While
perhaps a necessary requirement, the sign is unbefitting for the room in
several key ways. For one, the actual number of occupants is random. What
is the point of having 300 and 1 people in the room? Furthermore, for a
room of its size, 301 is an excessive number. Though if empty the number
would be appropriate, the room is filled with artwork, which would be
completely obscured in a filled room. Secondly, the work is bland, and
unbefitting of the room itself. It is however, a necessary piece of work,
and thus font and color reflect this, giving it the character that such a
sign deserves.

Bohemian Press

Josh Winkler
untitled
Color woodcut

I really like this piece because of the detail. I personally have never done woodcut, but believe it to be difficult. The detail of the individual parts of the piece are wonderful, especially the trucks and the steamboat I particularly like. Another thing I like about the piece is the use of subtle colors. The color usage was simple and not overbearing. I like how the artist decided to use color though. I don’t think would have been as good if he would have only used black. The effect of the woodcut is very neat. The objects in the piece almost have an animated quality to them.

Bohemian Press

TBA

bohemian press

So of course (apparent after reading what I chose for the iron pour) the print that I like most was Paula Marty’s “Space Invasion?. the giant tantacled monster from outer space grabbing and tearing at the puny buildings on earth. sort of a sci-fi campy feel with the pop art “Krunch? and the cartoon grids. I like the large size too, how it filled up the wall like an enlarged page from a comic book. the old school lino cut I liked also.I like the visible blade marks left on the lino, the stark high contrast black and white with hints of color added. I didn’t really like the space and display though. at night, it was too dark to see the artwork well, and during the day, the light reflected on the plexiglass and was too distracting.

Bohemian Press

I chose to write about a piece of artwork that was very interesting to me. The reason it stood out to me wasn't because of the design, colors, or the technique. It stood out to me because it reminded me of the 35W bridge which collapsed in August. This piece did not have a title or an artist with it. The piece did not have straight lines. It was very uneven. It was of a bridge over a river with traffic crossing it. Many big boats were going underneath the bridge looking to be carrying cargo.

Bohemian Press

I chose to write about a piece of artwork that was very interesting to me. The reason it stood out to me wasn't because of the design, colors, or the technique. It stood out to me because it reminded me of the 35W bridge which collapsed in August. This piece did not have a title or an artist with it. The piece did not have straight lines. It was very uneven. It was of a bridge over a river with traffic crossing it. Many big boats were going underneath the bridge looking to be carrying cargo.

Biography

Hello! My name is Mike Ballard and this is my entire biography. I have lived the majority of my life in the notoriously dull area of the Iron Range – Virginia MN to be specific – until I made my escape, with my wife – fiancée then – in 2006. Saint Paul is currently my place of refuge.
I only remember one memory of myself as a baby and it was eating sand on a beach in Florida while feeding seagull’s cheeto’s – it was a family trip to Disney World.
I guess I wasn’t the smartest baby, but I think I figured it out; see my mom ate fish while she was pregnant with me, and apparently, the mercury in fish can decrease a child’s IQ… I don’t blame her though because I like fish too.
From my toddler days until early teens, I usually mark my memory timeline with injuries
I received at different ages: 3 years old, falling off the back of the family van and receiving four or five stitches in the back of my head; 4 or 5 years old, picking rocks on a trip out west, fell and punctured another hole in my forehead, receiving a couple of more stitches; 6 or 7 playing on monkey bars, fell again, broke my arm in two places; 9 or 10, basketball related accident causing a dislocated pinky; and the list goes on into my teens with two football related accidents resulting in a broken arm and another dislocated finger. Okay, so maybe I was never really that smart or cautious, but I think I recovered.
After a life of childhood injuries I became interested with music – which I never had an in injury in – and I played drums in the high-school concert, jazz, and marching band as well as in a little high-school band. The band I was in was called “Dynamic Sun? it was fun, but in most regards it was pretty lame.
After high-school, I decided to save some money by going to the community college in Virginia, and during that time, the film North Country was shot. Fortunately, I was able to get on with the production and work as a PA (gopher) and that’s when I really started to get in to film. Since then I have been going to school for film here at the U.

Bohemian Press

The Bohemian Press gallery showed different types of print styles. A piece by Paula Marty titled Space Invasion (linocut 2008), had many different pieces to it. However, I really liked the piece of the spaceship at the bottom in the center. It was done by linocut, so the black was amazingly dark and deep. The print is a rectangle that is very short and quite wide. The spaceship is crammed into one end of the print with the rest of the piece being pitch black. The way the print is balanced makes it look like it is going to move. The spaceship could just take off and fly across the paper. It almost makes you think where it is going to go.

"Space Invasion"

Admittedly, I began looking at the works in the “Bohemian Press?
exhibit and really had no idea what it necessarily meant that they were
done through “printmaking.? With that as my starting point, I found the
most visually attractive piece to me personally to be the “Space Invasion?
one done by Paul Marty. It had several different stills somewhat visually
describing an attack by a invading alien Octopus-like creature. I found the
whole idea comical and it actually made me laugh, especially the “Krunch?
(yes, spelled like that) quotation around the part where the creature
seemingly swallows a missile fired at it. It was not until just before
leaving the exhibit that I heard how the black space in the work is the
actual ink and it is the negative space that is the true material the work
was created on. After hearing this, I was just looking at the pictures even
more astonished because it is unbelievable the detail that comes across by
actually using the negative space to tell the story of the image.

Bohemian Press

Untitled by: Laura Corcoran [Trace monotype, litho]
These are two very similar prints next to each other, which include what looks to be a plane, a satellite, electricity towers, and a building. It’s very dark and gloomy feeling because of the dark grey and black colors. It almost seems dirty. I’ve always thought power lines look really neat while looking at them go into the distance. It looks like the first steps of the plane as it’s about to take off. It seems to show the anticipation of the passengers, the pilot, and others.


Bohemian Press

Exhibition: Bohemian Press
Artist: Jeff Lohaus
Title: “Thais?
Medium: Bronze
Year: 2007

In this Henry Moore-esque bronze by Jeff Lohaus, a looming gargoyle of a misshapen blob has managed to have both brilliance and power. Almost plastic-like in its gleaming smoothness, its skeletal frame, like some sort of overgrown calf’s carcass dipped in bronze, rests deftly on its pedestal by two enormous, bulbous feet. These feet seem to have sprouted branches, spreading out like hollowed-out platypuses in the sky, twisting and turning one’s eyes and mind left and then right, defying space while freezing time. This truly is a powerful piece, one that evokes a rough and abstract majesty that is almost impossible to turn away from. It is unquestionably the sole standout in the collection.

Bohemian Press

"hawks lust for nightingale series" by Ash Hane

I really like the way that Hane displayed this. The images between
plexi-glass makes it viewable from two sides. The hawk with dog tags and
bombs dropping on cooling towers of a power plant give it a apocalyptic feel.
The other side has the same images but the hawk doesn't have the dog tags and
the bombs are a strange flower print. The title confuses me a little because
there isn't any mention of a nightingale. Overall I think the piece has
nicely put together and pleasant to look at. The meaning, if there is one,
escapes me.

Dont Play With Fire

Mark Biedrzyck
"Untitled"
Metal

Iron casts series utilizes repeated circuit and tube motifs to craft different character masks. The masks also appear to be petrified remains, possibly found by future archeologists. The colors are very dark and coarse, as if they were made of aged futuristic materials. Biedrzyck's aesthetic is extremely similar to Phillipe Druillet, a french illustrator from the 1970's. I would be really interested to see Biedryzyck expand his works into larger pieces and full costumes and scenes.

Bohemian Press

Robin Carley, “When it rains it pours?

For me to understand the message of a piece of art means something. I really related to it and how it pretty much symbolized being a young, broke, stressed out college student. The way the art was made was interesting as well, with the wood adding different layers to the picture itself. Also, the color scheme was very appropriate in the piece, with few bright colors and more neutral and dreary ones instead. When there actually was brightness it stuck out more and enhanced the meaning of the piece. It also conveyed a lot of meaning in a simple design.

Chambers Exhibit

The piece that I chose to analyze was created by Basanti (Caitlin) Miller. It is called "Tell Me Good Sir" and created in the year, 2008. This piece is big and pink with flowers and lilly pads, not my typical forte, but what struck out to me were the questions and words on it. It is supposed to represent, in a sardonic way, the questions women may ask of men when pursuing or when in a relationship. Men expect women to cater to them, understand them, and read their minds, which is what this work is playing at - the fact that women have all these questions and can't completely understand men...ever. Women wouldn't actually ask this of men, but it's these questions that run through their heads. The beauty of women is also shown through the pink water and delicate lilly pads, and their imperfections through splotches and any minor "mess-ups". I think it's an interesting and accurate portrayal.

Sound Recording








Weisman Exhibit (replacing Spark)

The piece, Hunter/Prey by: Wesley Kimler, captured me because it requires one to use his/her imagination. It appears to contain random colors: blue, brown, and some red, yellow, and white. It is meant to depict a hunter and prey as the brown outlines a shape similar to that of a man and the prey appears to be in his hand as it's very red. The imagination aspect take play because the brush strokes are big and easy to see. It looks as though the piece started out with good intentions to be very realistic and then after a while, paint was splattered over the piece. A lot of it dripped down, creating a second "layer" or "mask" to the painting making it more surreal and interesting. I liked it, though, as it brought a true, realistic feeling with simple colors and big strokes.

Katherine Nash April Exhibit

As seen in previous posts, I really appreciate digital art. That is why this piece stuck out to me so much. It consisted of a few thousand little squares of digital images being projected onto a wall. There was random talking, some of the people were quiet, the piece in its entirety hosted a lot of faces! I appreciated the title, "When I finally learned to stop listening and enjoy the music." This was reflected in the piece because it was all sorts of clutter and randomness going on and you couldn't really make out what any one person was saying unless you concentrated super hard which was still very difficult. It reflects that a lot of times people try to listen to all sorts of voices inside and outside of their head and when you finally stop trying to focus on each one individually and just enjoy the collective whole is when you are most at peace. The whole gallery at Katherine Nash was very grand scale, and other exhibits such as the rock water-flow, the bricks, and more were all really neat! A lot of time was put into these projects which is very respectable.

Chambers Hotel Exhibit 2

The exhibit I chose to explore at the Chambers hotel was the stairway. As a stairway, it seems like it wouldn't be anything too extravagant, but it was the exact opposite! This work was one of the largest works of Art I've seen yet. It extended up around 5 floors and literally covered all the walls. It included fish, trees, water, forest, graffiti writing, and seemingly "gang" art. It was all done using spray paint which was just amazing because spray paint, to me, is a lot harder to create pictures out of than regular paint and brushes. The spray paint media was easily seen as some spots had paint dripping down where too much spray paint was sprayed. This, I think, added to the art of it all. It wow-ed me and I thought the group of artists did a great job!

MAEP Exhibition: Andrea Stanislav

This exhibit was not what I expected at all. Right away there are mirrors everywhere with rhinestone horses and video production everywhere. I had never been to an exhibit like this. It was so interesting, almost as if the artist truly wanted you to be a part of the artwork. One thing that I loved was having to cross the river with the glittery rocks. It was great to not feel like you were in an exhibit. The lights reflecting off of the horses caused a glitzy look all over the exhibit.

Techtonic Industry

For this exhibit, I was not able to spend very much time. I was sad because it seemed so interesting and I wished I could've checked it out a little more. I stumbled upon a video which was playing. It was called "Innovative Touch." I did not catch who it was by. It showed many different pictures that all seemed to fit into a movie. Every shot was so different, yet somewhere they worked together. I believe it was because it showed people doing what they loved to do. There was a variety of things going on such as someone painting, then it would move on to a different photograph of someone working with metal. After it was done, I started to think about it. Why did a movie of many different photographs capture my attention? I think it was because of the difference in every picture. I was almost excited to see what picture would come up next! Like I said earlier, I wish I would've been able to spend more time because there was so much to see!

Kuhr+Lyon+drawing

The Nash Gallery was displaying drawings, which were mostly black and white, but there were a few that were vibrantly colored. The pieces ranged from just newly created to a few centuries old. The piece of art that I chose to write about was from George Morrison, untitled 1977, lithograph on paper. It consisted of a tangle of lines drawn throughout the paper seemingly at random. However, at about three quarters up the piece there was an almost solid line running straight from side to side. Your eyes were instantly drawn from the randomness of the drawing, straight to this line. It made me look closer to try and find some hidden pattern or shape. Although I could not find any, I liked the piece a lot because I felt like I had to take a closer look to take it all in.

"The Tears of a Broken Hearted Ojibway" by Star Wallowing Bull

tears of a broken hearted ojibway.jpg
"The Tears of a Broken Hearted Ojibway"
Star Wallowing Bull
2001
Prisma Color Pencil

As I was wondering around the Weisman one Saturday I came across a piece that was tucked in the corner somewhat. I didn't know really what the other works around were either, so I'm not sure if this was part of one of the exhibits or just a piece the Weisman was displaying for the time being. But you could not help but be visually stimulated by it, if your eye caught it at all it would have to turn to at least see what it was you were being called by. I walked over and at first was completely overwhelmed by all of the dramatic, bright, vibrant colors being used in the abstract drawing. It was a really 'busy' piece in that it was hard to stay focused on any particular aspect initially. I looked at the label for the artwork and then after seeing that it was a work done by an American Indian I started to really zone in on all of the symbolism found throughout the work. Like I said, the bright (almost neon-like) colors draw attention to certain areas of the drawing including the tears running down the man's face along with a visible shatter line in the man's heart. There are a lot of traditional Indian symbols throughout including the man wearing native clothes, incorporation of animals, and the acknowledge of the intimate relationship with nature in general. However, there also is frequent reference to alcohol as well, symbolizing how the man may be turning to alcohol as a form of coping with his intensely broken heart. Another interesting use of symbols within the drawing is how, within the center segment of the drawing, on the viewers left-hand side is a falling star and then on the right-hand side is rising bird (possibly a Phoenix). I took this to mean that initially the emotion and pain the man is going through is tough to handle but how he will rise again and find his way out of it - especially considering the bird appears to be flying toward an exit sign within the bar-like background. Overall I thought the most powerful and attention drawing aspect of the work was how the artist use vibrant colors to draw attention to certain areas of the work and emphasize. All of the symbols and different segments of the work are in some way connected back to the center image. Definately cool (I know, a very 'art-sy' and technical comment, ha).

Scholarship Exhibition (Quarter Gallery)

"Is that all right" By: Sarah Reuter caught my attention because it was the first thing I heard walking into the gallery. I recognized the song as Damien Rice's "Nine Crimes." In this work of art, a guy says goodbye, gets on a boat, gets off at the shore on the other end. Birds follow him there and he ends up shooting the birds and creating a lot of blood and gore. It looked like a flipbook or stop motion piece using animation with pastel and charcoal. The thing that stuck out to me was that it didn't look like the artist used new pages, it looked like they simply wiped off/smeared the old picture and moved by drawing the new picture a little differently. This created a sort of shadow behind each new picture from smear marks which was really neat looking. It was overall a violent piece complete with a lot of blood and the smearing of the pastels and charcoal really added to it.

Constructive Criticism Exhibition

At Chambers, Greg Keaton’s The Transfiguration of Music (Hip Hop) 2008 was both creative and thought provoking. The use of aerosol and paint throughout the piece created a variety of colorful and the large black and white boom box in the center balanced the color out. I liked the artist’s statement and thought his piece helped unite them well in the Constructive Criticism exhibition. In the artwork Greg criticizes Hip Hop music in today’s world. He says that it used to have meaning and cultural values to it but that because of the industry it has become meaningless. I like that he uses another form of art to question because as an art student I get caught up in it. I found it reassuring to know that there are other things people criticize. I picked to write about this piece of art because I think it’s one that works well in an exhibition as well as on a house wall.

Ahn Sung-Ha (b. 1977)
Cigarettes 2004
Oil on Canvas

My first reason for choosing to write about this piece was the fact that it was done by a female, Korean artist, which we have in common. Well, the female-Korean aspect…not so much the artist aspect, maybe someday ^_^ but, anyway, the other reason for choosing this piece was because its concept of the cigarettes in a glass was very interesting to me. The interaction between “darkness and beauty? with the cigarettes was quite idiosyncratic. It wasn’t the mundane type of “cigarette art? that I’ve typically seen (i.e. cigarette in an ashtray). This piece to me was very aesthetically pleasing as well. I couldn’t get over how real it looked. It looked like an actual photograph.

Rachel B.

The colors in ‘Seabird’ by Gary Hum, are beautiful and totally brighten up the front sitting area of the Chambers lounge. I was able to visit during the day with the natural sunlight beaming through the windows, allowing the colors to really pop out at you. The blue in the background really accented the different colored spheres. I found this piece to be very welcoming.

“Other Thing’ by Subodh Gupta is a great piece to put in the entrance. My daughter immediately ran to it, wanting to feel the ‘things’ hanging from it, completely ignoring the rope in front of the piece, preventing just that. It reminded me of a really big Koosh ball, the weird, rubbery balls I played with as a child. I asked my daughter what she liked about the piece and she said, “It’s shiny.?

The most impressive piece that I found today was ‘Pencil 1’ by Hon Kyong Tack. The size alone was massive The colors were amazing and the detail was incredible. It took many years for him to finish the piece and I can only imagine the satisfaction he had once it was complete.

Rachel B.

The colors in ‘Seabird’ by Gary Hum, are beautiful and totally brighten up the front sitting area of the Chambers lounge. I was able to visit during the day with the natural sunlight beaming through the windows, allowing the colors to really pop out at you. The blue in the background really accented the different colored spheres. I found this piece to be very welcoming.

“Other Thing’ by Subodh Gupta is a great piece to put in the entrance. My daughter immediately ran to it, wanting to feel the ‘things’ hanging from it, completely ignoring the rope in front of the piece, preventing just that. It reminded me of a really big Koosh ball, the weird, rubbery balls I played with as a child. I asked my daughter what she liked about the piece and she said, “It’s shiny.?

The most impressive piece that I found today was ‘Pencil 1’ by Hon Kyong Tack. The size alone was massive The colors were amazing and the detail was incredible. It took many years for him to finish the piece and I can only imagine the satisfaction he had once it was complete.

Bohemian Press

The piece I chose to reflect on from the “Bohemian Press? exhibition is an elegant print called “Cranes Dancing? by Nancy Nelson. It was a black and white print of two cranes dancing in a field. Although it was a small and simple piece, I felt its minimalism is why I liked it so much. When I look at it, the cranes seem so inspired and content and, by looking at it, I can feel those same emotions. The style of the print also reminds me of the kind of prints I grew up around and the belief that less is more.

Bohemian Press

The piece I chose to reflect on from the “Bohemian Press? exhibition is an elegant print called “Cranes Dancing? by Nancy Nelson. It was a black and white print of two cranes dancing in a field. Although it was a small and simple piece, I felt its minimalism is why I liked it so much. When I look at it, the cranes seem so inspired and content and, by looking at it, I can feel those same emotions. The style of the print also reminds me of the kind of prints I grew up around and the belief that less is more.

Constructive Criticism

Talk to me sir by Basanti (Caitlin) Miller (2008) is composed of many
different pieces that could be described as feminine. There were earrings,
nail polish, tweezers, diamonds and other things of that nature. The work
had an unhappy tone to it. There are quotes with each piece on the canvas
that gave more insight to what the artist was portraying. It was great to see
some of the issues in the piece brought to the attention of the public. Most
of the time the media is telling us how to dress and what is appropriate, and
Talk to me sir is gives great perspective that shows that a lot of the media
is ridiculous.

Quarter Gallery: Scholarship and Fellowship Awards 08-09

Since we have been working with stop motion in class I decided to respond to one in the Quarter Gallery. I think Sarah Reuter’s 2007, Is that all Right, stop motion video was a good example to see because it showed me some new possibilities that I could add to mine. In the work she used pastels and charcoal, which I think made it stand out more than pencil would. On my first stop motion I used colored pencils, but I didn’t even think of the huge variety of mediums that could be used for this type of artwork. I also think the music adds so much to the piece and that is what initially caught my attention. I think the music also helps with the mood of the piece and tells a better story. In my first stop motion video the time each picture was viewed was ½ a second. Reuter’s video held each picture for a longer amount of time, which I think gave it more of a “stop? motion appeal and allowed its viewer to have a more in depth thought processes. Reuter’s artwork taught me new ideas about stop motion and inspired me to get more creative.

Walker Art Center

The exhibits Worlds Away featured works inspired by suburbia that show the
good and bad of the urban sprawl that is now happening. Chris Ballantyne’s
(2003) untitled (Berm) takes the side that urbanization is bad. His painting
shows a small patch of trees surrounded by a parking lot on all four sides.
Urban sprawl is defiantly taking more and more land everyday. This painting
highlights our priorities, and obviously the people making the decisions
choose that parking is more important than the wilderness. The idea is
further highlighted because the painting is done on a piece of wood. It
seemed to me that this represented that the trees have long been paved over
and were used for other things, like mulch for the new building that stands
there, or for the canvas that depicted that they once existed.

Photoshop Tip

My photoshop tip is to use the dodge and burn tools. The dodge looks like a pin with a ball head and the burn looks like a thumb and finger pinching something. The dodge tool will make whatever spot you touch lighter and the burn will make it darker. It adds for a cool effect.

Scapes, Master of Fine Arts Thesis Exhibition

In the Nash Gallery’s Scapes, Master of Fine Arts Thesis Exhibition, Christopher Baker’s Hello World! Or: How I learned to Stop Listening and Love the Noise, 2008 video projection was enormously impressive. There was 8 channel audios that displayed a huge wall of random you tube videos. I thought it was a creative idea, especially in the 21st century. While you sit there and watch it becomes overwhelming because you realize how many people spend so much time alone on their computers. There does not have to be any interaction between people anymore. I was also surprised how many phones went off while they were online, which helps demonstrate the use of technology. There was a guy sitting next to me who said, “I feel kind of like God, just hanging out ant watching everyone.? I thought that was a unique way of looking at the artwork. Baker was present while I was at the exhibition and he explained that he felt it was an accurate description of how he saw the world today. I agree with him on this on so many levels. I am reminded of this every time a computer crashes because people become dependent upon them and do not know what to do.