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September 25, 2007

Guess Speaker & Studio E

Well I wasn't able to make it to class on Thursday so I'm not able to write
about our guess speaker that showed up. But what I heard from other student
was really interesting.

But while our visit to Studio E I found it to be awesome. I never knew that
the U of M have these equipment for us student to use so I was amazed on how
lucky we are compare to other. But I was glad that I'm able to see how a
green screen worked in real life. I always hear people talked about the green
screen and see it being done on T.V. and stuff, but this was my very first
time seeing it from my very own eye and it was awesome. This Studio is an
awesome place and I would love to learn more about how to use the green
screen and experience on how to use the studio equipment.

September 17, 2007

instructor cheryl wilgren clyne

cheryl wilgren clyne
clyne003@umn.edu

artist statement and resume
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/clyne003/resume//
thesis exhibition
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/clyne003/mfathesis//

September 16, 2007

"Utopia" by Jenny Schmid and Patrick Holbrook

My first impression while watching this film was that it was really strange.

The reason why the film seem strange to me was because to me there wasn't any
point of the film. But what I like best about the film and thought it was
the most interesting part was the part when they guy was walking away and
reading from his book and a light beaming down on what he was reading. I
though it was interesting because i think it was cool how the creator was
able to make him walk away from the camera.

September 15, 2007

Document of China

Visiting the “Document of China? at the Wiseman Museum was very interesting.

Walking into that section of the Museum was a very colorful sight, because of the big colorful picture that was in front of the main walkway. But what caught my eye the most while wondering around, was the Heaviness of Industry Series. The reason why that caught my eyes the most was because the pictures have a very strong feeling to it. The group of picture show how the working condition is like for each different person such as Hebi, Henan, in 1999. The pictures show how he isn’t wearing any safety protection in the work area and how dirty and messy it is. With so few words to explain how the working condition is like in China these picture are a wonderful and powerful why to show us the viewer how hard they are working in China to serve.

September 12, 2007

"Utopia In Progress" by Jenny Schmid + Patrick Holbrook Response

The animation titled "Utopia in Progress" was very engaging to me. Honestly, I still know very little about animation, much less animation in Final Cut Pro. It was really interesting to see some great examples of what you can do.

It gave me a lot of ideas in how I can use personal works of non-digital art and incorporate them into an animation while also using digital art. I'm sure there is a lot of gray area and I hope that I am able to explore using technology along with drawings/paintings or footage I've filmed. I think that would be very interesting to try.
Also the artist's style is a lot different, just the drawing he/she used. I enjoy seeing different styles and hearing different ideas because I really feel that it opens my eyes and lets me expand in my own art and more generally, knowledge of the world. I thought that the way he/she transitioned into different scenes was very well done. It was almost seamless in some ares despite the scenes being almost opposite. Throughout the animation, I was very engaged in what was happening. There was a lot of information to take in conceptually. I felt that the name "Utopia in Progress" suggests a heavy content. However, the feelings I got from this video spoke to the idea that utopia doesn't exist-that the world we live in may seem like utopia at certain moments, however it is always in progress, changing, inconsistent. I think that the fact that this animation can draw ideas in each individual through its subject and form makes it successful in many manners of speaking.

Documenting China Response

When I saw the exhibit, I was really excited to see that they were simply displayed, mostly large scale photographs. For me, this type of exhibit lets me absorb the content much more and the reality of China's growth and change.

The image that struck me most was one of main photographs by Zhou Hai. He took it in Hebi, Henan, 1999 and it pictured an industrial worker in front of what looks to be a type of factory. It stuck out to me due to not only the extremely well-displayed content but also the amazing use of artistic principals. Because the man in the photograph is addressing the camera, it creates an intense urge for the viewer (at least for me) to study his face. The man doesn't seem too old but his face seems worn and tired. However, his gaze suggests persistance and inner strength. Due to these perceptions, the photograph takes on more meaning than just a man in front of a factory. The shift from rural to urban, farm to industry seems obvious although implied. The artistic components utilized by the artist work together to emphasize the man's figure. Contrast of white fog or smoke behind the man seems to set him quite forward in the picture plane which makes it feel more personal, like he is closer, to me-the viewer. With many of the photographs there, this effect was well used by the photographers. Many of the photographs felt intimate which was interesting because the subjects in the pictures are half-way around the world. I thought that Zhou Ming did an extremely good job of selecting the photographs as I was engaged with a photograph for a long time yet yearned to see the next. I don't feel like that in every exhibit. It was very interesting and I learned much more than I thought by just viewing the photographs and exploring their content, and observing the artistic components.

September 11, 2007

Batman

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Jenny Schmid + Patrick Holbrook Response

In Patrick Holbrook and Jenny Schmid’s animation, nothing is what it seems in this cartoon. Objects that normally would be stationary move and have personality. It’s an interesting mix of photography and hand drawn images.

The settings used as backdrops for the animation add a lot of depth and detail. The girl and guy that were drawn had a lot of detail as well. They each had a certain facial expression that I don’t think changed throughout the animation, but it still had quite an effect. The girl seemed to be a bit on the wild side, which became even more apparent as she’s parachuting through the sky, and skateboarding so quickly the background becomes blurred. I thought the blurry background was a great way of showing the speed of the girl; she really looked like she was moving.
The guy had a look of curiosity and sweetness that is displayed through his constant reading of books. You feel kind of bad for the guy-he is abducted by an alien spacecraft and has all of his books knocked out of his hands at which point they fly away. The All Seeing Eye fluttering around like a butterfly had a discernible personality as well. It flies off the wall in order to light up the book the guy is reading, and when he is abducted, the pyramid stops and faces directly at the viewer. I felt that it was surprised and bummed out that the guy was gone. There was a lot going on in this animation. I would be really interested to learn why the artist put the things she did into the animation, and how it’s all connected.

"Utopia" by Patrick Holbrook + Jenny Schmid Response

The Utopia animation was a lot of fun to watch because there was always a new twist on what was happening. It is pretty abstract in that there are things happening which cannot be fully explained, but it has a lot of “normal? things and I did not feel confused watching it.

The mix of normal and abstract was the best part, such as the very conventional scene of the boy and girl with their separate lives denoted by different music, colliding. Instead of them falling in love the book the boy is carrying floats away, and turns into a concert scene. The animation itself was fun because most of it looked like paper cutouts moving over flat background. The animators did a good job of playing with this though when part of the background stats flapping its wings and turns into a butterfly to follow the boy around. There are also a lot of seamless transitions created by a close up of one thing becoming something else in the net scene. The ending is not really built up to nor is anything accomplished in terms of story, but the purple bubble overtaking the entire screen serves as a good ending point because it is the only time there is a complete color wash.

Blob of Death








Creating this animation was difficult for me because I have no finesse when it comes to drawing, which is why I used a stick figure and a messy blob. I like the idea of transitioning from one media to another, sio I have the pencil drawn stick figure be taken over by the color pastel blob.

Chambers Hotel Response

The piece that I fell in love with at the Chambers Hotel was the first one I saw, "George". The artist, Salustiano, made it in 2004 with natural pigment and acrylic on canvas.

What grabbed me in this painting was the color. From a distance is look like 90% of this piece is a uniform color of red, which is a beautiful deep dark red. When you get closer to it you can see that there is another shade of red, which is very different, and creates the outline of a person. The one non-red part of the piece is the face of a person. It is difficult to tell the sex of the person but the look very young and innocent. The darker red outlining their body shows their upper torso, and a hood around the back half of their head. The coolest thing about this painting is the very subtle differences in the shades of red, and how precisely those subtle differences create a person. According to our guide, those subtle differences in color were accomplished making layer upon layer of color.

Placement Gallery Response

The piece that immediately drew me in was "he arrive right on time" because it is very colorful and the person it shows has a very pitiful look. This look makes me feel very sorry for the person and for some reason that is part of why I like this piece. This piece is by John Fleischer with mixed media.

The person looks so pitiful because the expression it has is just sad, and the outline of its shoulders shows them hunched, like it is trying to hide itself. Also on top of its head are two curved horns, which look like they could not harm a fly. So, instead of looking scary they just make it look ugly, like an outcast. While the majority of this piece is white, the face really stands out with bright vibrant colors of all shades of red green and blue. At first the colors look like they were finger-painted on by a three year old, but they really help define different parts of the face. Possibly my favorite part about this piece is at the top floating upside down above the head is written "he arrive right on time" and then beneath the word time "space". To me this lack of correct grammar combined with the idea of someone arriving in the correct time/space is funny because it is ironic. The lack of grammar makes the phrase seem vague and possibly childish, but the idea of time/space is exact and scientific.

Fresh Works Response

The piece that I chose out of the Fresh Works is “My leg, Icelandic State park, North Dakota, September 2006?(I am pretty sure that whole thing is the title). It is a photo of exactly what is says, a leg.

The leg is sticking straight down out of the top middle of the picture. It is clad in shorts, and a shoe, and is standing in a field of grass. The grass is bent to either side of he foot in a straight line vertically on the photo. It looks almost as if the force of the leg has created a wind so strong as to push all the grass aside. More likely he just stepped in a furrow in the ground. One if the reasons I like this photo is it makes me wonder where the person who is connected to that leg is. Especially, how did he manage to stand on his one leg, keeping it vertical, and stay out of the frame of the picture. All I can imagine is someone precariously balancing on one leg, with the other one up in the air while a photo is shot, then falling over.

SAD Response

I chose "The Still Time" which was made by Charles Matson Lume in 2007. I picked this one because it grabbed my attention immediately when I walked into the museum. It consisted of dozens of small round mirrors on the ground, and a bright light shining down on them at an angle to create a light pattern on the wall. The mirrors were arranged in an arc which starts skinny, get fatter at the middle, and then skinny again at the end. There are also pieces of fiber optics on the wall, which when caught be the reflected light, seemed to glow. I liked this piece because of the way the light looked on the wall, it created a very cool visual effect. Also I like things made of simple shapes and plain backgrounds

When I read the plaque on the wall about the piece I realized that this was only a third of the entire work of art. On the wall opposite what I initially saw there was another arc, this one was not near the floor but up about 8 feet in the air. The arc was made up of brightly colored straws and flowery drink parasols. On the other side of the wall the colorful arc was on was another arc. This one was much like the first one except that instead of the fiber optics, the wall was covered with plastic glow-in-the-dark icicles.

These three arcs represent different seasons of the Midwest. The two with the mirrors on the ground create a very cold light arc which shows the sunlight during the winters. It shows the limited light during the winter and the lack of visual variation(no color, stark landscapes). The winter arc with the plastic icicles is reminiscent of a blizzard or just snow in general. The mirrors themselves reflect white light which looks similar to the reflection of the sun off a fresh layer of snow. Both of these create a feeling of loneness and isolation by the show the monotony and lack of change throughout all winters.

Sandwiched between these two oppressive seasons is the savior: summer. This arc is opposite in nearly every way possible two the other two arcs. It is up high, bright and colorful, as if looking up into the sun on a hot day. The warm colors make just looking at it feel good. Also the floral pattern on the parasols remind me of the flourishing plants in the summer. Also the materials themselves, the colorful straws, are something only used when drinking something fun and refreshing. This euphoric summer seems fleeting because of its placement between two cold winters. As if most of the time it is something yearned for but not there.

Documenting China

The photograph that I chose was an untitled piece by Luo Yongjin taken in the 1990's. I really like this photograph for a few reasons. One is it is in black and white, which is an aesthetic that I usually like over color. It gives the photograph a very old fashioned feel, like it was taken in a time before our generation.

Another thing that I like about it is the empty space created by the building in the upper left hand corner. It looks like an entire section of the building was taken out. I also like how this empty space contrasts with the right side of the photograph, which is an alley or narrow street with tall building on either side. The view of the entire street is blocked by a stack of boxes, this makes the right side feel very crowded and this creates the contrast with the open space on the other side. The photograph also has a lot of movement because of this contrast. When I look at it, my eyes first jump to the white sky in the empty corner, then follow the row of buildings down the lane, only to be interrupted by the stack of boxes.

Placement Gallery 2

Among the artists at the Obsessive Compulsive exhibit I enjoyed the art of Melissa Gahagan. All of her drawings have a unique fluid movement in them, even if what’s depicted is a stationary object.

Just as in Nick Howard’s case, Gahagan’s drawings all seem to take place in a fantasy world of her own design. As I was looking at the drawing titled “Home,? I was reminded of the animated French film Fantastic Planet. There’s a sequence in the movie that involves a young man who doesn’t understand the dangers of his surroundings, and is almost killed by a tentacle like creature that looks like the tree in “Home.? The way the people are portrayed also reminded me of the movie. They seem so small and nymph-like, especially in the drawing titled “All Tied Up.? The scene looks like it was taken from long ago, when people would dance (sometimes naked), under the moonlit sky, like in ancient Greece. I’m taking a Greek mythology class right now, so that’s why I thought of Greece specifically. I also love the giant birds in comparison with the human bodies. It adds a mystical feel to the drawing “Rootsr.? It almost looks like the giant bird is attached to the branch or rock itself. It looks like it’s all connected. Also, all of her drawings seem to take place at night or maybe in a foggy or dusty place. There’s an overall somber tone to her work. It gives off the sense that there’s more going on around the central image, and it’s left up to the imagination to figure out what that is.

Dehang Zheng

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I was born in China on April 5th 1989. My hometown is on the coast of the
Pacific Ocean.

The climate there was warm and bright year round.
Occasionally, the sky will darken during hurricane seasons. As a child, I was
extremely shy. By the age of six, my family and I moved to New York City.
There, I started school and finished elementary. New York City is full of
interactions, but as a shy child, I was isolated in my small apartment. My
atmosphere was more of a gloomy environment. To begin middle school, my
family and I moved to Rochester, Minnesota.

I experienced a sudden and dramatic change in the environment. The streets,
no longer filled with pedestrians and there were open fields everywhere.
Through my memory, my first impression of Rochester was bothered by the
silence and darkness of each night compared to New York City. The feeling
created a depressing environment. I didn’t overcome this disturbance until
weeks after. In New York City, snow was brown and mushy due to high traffic.
In Rochester, I found the snow to be soft and fluffy pile high. The winter
season helped me adjust to the environment in Rochester. I was delighted to
see pure snow. What I once thought of Minnesota, being dull and silent, has
changed. Now my eyes have fine-tuned itself, to see the interactions in
nature. New York City certainly lacks in that element. To move back to New
York City would be very difficult. Last summer when I vacationed by Lake
Superior, I found myself soaking in nature like never before. I was there for
a week without much sleep or food but I was able to feed off the energy
provided by nature. I can’t wait to go back! The works in SAD are related to
my experience throughout my life. Nature, atmosphere, seasons, light and
environment have all played an important role in my life.

Vang Yang

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My parents are Hmong immigrants that move from Thailand to the United State during the Vietnam War in 1988. A month later when they arrive in the U.S. they had me, Vang Yang. I was born in the city call Wausau, WI. into a family of eight, counting myself and my parents, I was also born as the middle child. I lived in Wausau, WI for 13 years then later move to St. Paul, MN. Now I am currently a resident in St. Paul and been living here for 6 years.

My parents being among the first Hmong immigrants in the United State make me and my sibling the first generation in the United State and to graduate from High School. Other then myself I have three older siblings that are currently attending a University as students. Having three older sibling attending a University made my first year in college easier then some other student, because having three sibling with experience of college life made me understand how much they have to study every day which showed me how I should prepared for college. There are two reason why I keep myself motivated to stay in school which are, my older siblings keep on pressuring myself to go because they know that it would help me find a better job in the future, and to get a higher education so I could be able to support myself and my family in the future.
My goals that I have set myself up to are many such as, to graduate from college with a BA degree, finding a job that’s related to my career, finish fixing my Honda Civic, get a motorcycle, then finial get married and have kids and travel around the world. With all these goals that I have to accomplish, I know that it’s going to be awhile but someday I would fulfill it all.

Erich Welton

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Hi, my name is Erich Joseph Welton. I am from Madison, Wisconsin. I am 21 years old and a senior here at the U of M. I am a BFC student focusing in Printmaking.

I took this class because I thought it would be fun to make some movies and further my knowledge in art. The first two years that I attended the U, I was in the pre-architecture program. Because I switched, I will have to stick around for a 5th year but I’m not too worried about it. I once heard a quote, “Leaving college in 4 years is like leaving a party at 11 o’clock.? I don’t know who said that but I completely agree. I have stayed up here every summer since my freshman year and have thoroughly enjoyed all of them. I am also on the swim team here at the U and have been swimming since I was 5 years old. My mom coached me for the first 7 years that I swam. I mostly swim freestyle and butterfly. Most of my best friends come from swimming. As hard as it can be, I love swimming and wouldn’t have it any other way. In my free time, I like to disc golf and go wakeboarding. In high school, two of my friends and I would spend almost every day out on the lake. We got a boat, a Mastercraft X-2, when I was a sophomore in high school. I really miss my boat so much because now that I stay up here all summer I never really get a chance to ride behind it. Most of the time I just chill out with my roommates and friends listening to music, watching tv, and playing Wii. That’s me in a nutshell.

Aaron Troe

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My name is Aaron Troe. I am eighteen years old. I was born in Albert Lea,
Minnesota, and have lived there my whole life. I love sports and film.

My name is Aaron Troe. I am eighteen years old. I was born in Albert Lea,
Minnesota, and have lived there my whole life. I love sports, I played
baseball, basketball, and football in high school. Though I grew up in a
small town in Southern Minnesota, I have always tried to expand my horizons
and learn about different people and cultures. I love film. I plan on
majoring in film and hope to someday become a director. My favorite
directors are Quentin Tarantino and Wes Anderson. My favorite movie is
probably Pulp Fiction, although there is a long list of others. I like to
make short films with my friends, we usually just make short, stupid ones
that have no real artistic meaning, but I would like to start becoming more
serious about film making. Apart from film, I also like to paint and draw.
I usually do athletes, because I like sports, but I paint other stuff
sometimes, too. One artist who I really admire is Andy Warhol, love the
simplicity and colors in his work. Most of my work is really upbeat, happy,
and colorful because that's the kind of person I try to be.

Scott Scoby

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My name is Scott Scoby. I am nineteen years old and from Cedarburg, Wisconsin. I graduated from Cedarburg High School in 2006.

During my years at Cedarburg High, I was involved in a number of things. I played varsity golf for three years and varsity soccer for two years. I was also a big fan of intramural basketball. I stayed busy being a part of the Swing and Chamber choirs. This led to many opportunities that include singing the National Anthem at a Milwaukee Bucks game and singing backup vocals for stars such as Rita Coolidge and Judy Collins. It was also fun performing in our high school musical and in variety shows. Last year, I performed at The Whole theater at Coffman which included piano, guitar, and vocals. I guess if I had to pick a favorite thing, it would have to be music. I enjoy playing guitar, piano, and also studying music in general. My favorite band is The Dave Matthews Band, however, I also enjoy a lot of music from a lot of different genres. During high school, I DJ’d for some dances and pep rallies which helped me become more knowledgeable about the Hip-hop and Rap genres of music. I am also a big fan of roller coasters. One of my favorite places to visit is Cedar Point at Sandusky, Ohio, which is the roller coaster capital of the world. In my free time, I enjoy playing guitar, ultimate Frisbee, and finding time for some golf. This past summer I was a golf instructor at a golf course. I taught mainly 4-6 year olds the fundamentals of the golf swing as well as some advanced techniques for the more skilled toddlers.
I think the artwork Endless Day can relate to my life in the fact that my life does not have a set schedule or cycle of events. I tend to not plan anything too far ahead; I pretty much do a lot of things spur of the moment. This can sometimes feel like the endless day when a lot of work piles up, and there are deadlines to meet. If I get more organized, more of my life will start to drift away from that endless day feeling. I am still undecided about what I want to major in; I hope to figure that out by the end of this year.

Lydia Schlicht

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Most often, my ideas, conversations and artistic creations are inspired by psychological, spiritual, emotional and cultural ideas.

Throughout my life, I have been given many opportunities to explore. However, individuals who have sacrificed in order to further my knowledge, wisdom and discovery have shaped me far more than the experiences I have had the privilege of knowing. Through that unique freedom and encouragement, growth in various topics tends to speak out through my art. Most often, my ideas, conversations and artistic creations are inspired by psychological, spiritual, emotional and cultural ideas.

Due to my interest in these areas, the SAD exhibit effected me from many angles, speaking for understanding and awareness to the relationship between humans, perception and seasons. The exhibit continues to fascinate me in both narrow and broad thoughts it evoked. How our lives and minds are constantly changing, contrasting and moving, altered by an indefinite amount of factors is a fact that dumbfounds me. Why are we so easily swayed to feel, think and act certain ways? Why do some issues affect individuals visible ways while other issues affect in unseen ways? Is it all by chance
that each person reacts in the way they do?

Because of these factors, I understand that I constantly change and daily inspire to become more aware of the truth behind reactions, thoughts, and emotions. In the past, that awareness has proven more valuable than I can even fathom. This truth plays into art as I tend towards surprising abstract images that use the elements of art in simplistic ways. As with art, music I enjoy includes unpredictable melodies ranging from high pitches to low, incorporating simple jumps, slides and instrumental/vocal sounds to order to create emotional songs.

My dreams are to continue learning, growing in kindness, humility, self-control, contentment, wisdom, love and joyfulness in serving others.

Vang Moua

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Hello, my name is Vang Moua and not Moua Vang. Some of my friends call me Heero. I am a freshman commuter at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. I’m currently an undecided on what to major in.

When it comes to art I believe art is in many forms, currently I’m into music and films but when it comes the knowledge of art I am in the dark. I have almost no art skill. I’m really bad on computers and horrible when it comes to the Internet. I just currently caught up with MSN and youtube; there is only myspace and facebook to catch up with. Hopefully there is no more that is going to pop up. Other then my computer skills I a very bad at writing, hopefully I will develop this skill with a few years at the university. I love to play video games and just recently bought a Wii. When it comes to sports I will just about play anything, but my favorite is tennis. I will probably never join a team in sports because of the rules. I don’t like to compete; to me it takes out the fun in the game. I’m quiet when I don’t know anybody but loud we time pass by. If you see my friends and me somewhere and we are yelling at each other that is normal. We are main laughing a lot and usually get in trouble for that. I have been told that I am easily to get along with. I don’t know how much of that is true? I’m a good listen and am always glad to give advice when it is needed. I use to have a loud voice but I’m getting old so I get tired of yelling; I am like 18 now.

Kurtis Melby

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I was born and raised here in Minneapolis. Although I have not lived anywhere else I have traveled a fair amount. I have visited relatives in a few states across the country and been to Mexico(three times), Costa Rica, and Argentina. I speak some Spanish because I my elementary school was Spanish immersion, which means about half of the classes were taught in Spanish. Unfortunately I rarely use my second language so I am forgetting it quickly.

In High School I started playing Ultimate(Frisbee), which is still my main hobby. In addition to that I like to play games of all kinds, including Bridge, Cranium, and Warcraft 3. I also see a lot of movies, partially because I work at a movie theater. My favorite movies are usually the non-blockbuster ones, or possibly foreign.

I have virtually no background in art. The only art I ever made was for required classes in school. My major is Computer Science. I chose this because I like solving problems and using computers. The downside is that I need to take a lot of math and physics, which are boring. I have taken a couple art related classes I have taken were Intro to Film, and a class studying Hitchcock and his films. My favorite part about movies is the visual aspect, especially when movies do something outside the norm, like Sin City. I took this class because it sounded like a fun combination of art and computers.

Amy Marron

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Amy’s Story
I was born and raised in Minnesota, always hated the cold, but because of my freckles never became a sun worshiper either. In school I enjoyed art. I became fond of drawing portraits. I enjoyed realism and

Amy’s Story

I was born and raised in Minnesota, always hated the cold, but because of my freckles never became a sun worshiper either. In school I enjoyed art. I became fond of drawing portraits. I enjoyed realism and the fact that I could make someone look just like they are in made me feel pretty proud, but I’m not a gloater.
After high school I was still not sure what I wanted to be when I grew up so I took some general classes at the local community college. One late night while watching television a commercial for brown institute came on it said “do you like to draw?, that’s all I had to hear. The next day my mom took me to Brown just to ‘check out’ the program. That day I was signed up for the Advertising Design program.
I received my degree from Brown and it was real hard to get my foot in the door and I was not drawing. I had already realized during the two year program that the commercial “do you like to draw? was just the teaser that pulled me and so many others in, so I was not disillusioned. But it was not really where my heart was.
One cold winter morning after an ice storm, while trying to pry my car door open using the old pour a bucket of hot water on the door cracks method, I slipped on the ice that was created on the ground from my bucket of hot water. Just then I remembered my cousin telling me how great Arizona was and I should move out there.
The next day I told my parents the plan. Two weeks later my folks, my cat -Spot, and all the clothes that would fit in my car drove to Phoenix Arizona. Later I found out my cousin did not live anywhere near Phoenix, but that did not ruin the plan. I was going to have an exciting adventure in a new WARM city. I found my first decent paying job, for a recently graduated student, as a typesetter. I stayed at that job for over three years.
Eventually I did move back to Minneapolis, and luckily I immediately found a job making more than double my salary in Phoenix. I couldn’t believe it, but I’m not one to look a gift horse in the mouth. I stayed with the company for over three years and decided I felt secure enough to purchase my first house. The week I closed the house I had a health incident and was ‘laid-off’ at work-so they said. Luckily the house I purchased was a duplex, so my tenant helps significantly with the mortgage.
That was a few years ago and since then I applied to college and I am starting my second year. I feel so lucky that I was accepted as an art student. I get a second chance to pursue my fine arts interest and discover other interests as well. Last summer I interned at the Center for Homicide Research. From artist to Forensics, how random is that. That was a great opportunity that I never would have discovered nor been eligible for, had I not been enrolled at the U of M. What luck!
please comment

Meena Mangalvedhekar

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I am a simple being who likes to search, observe, create and express. With
A quench to know people; what makes them what breaks them. My attempt is to
experience my surroundings, understand its situations and interact through
visuals.

The deeply rooted Indian urben and rural culture, previous job in photojournalism, trekking and travelling in Asia and Europe made me discover myself.

Here, in US and in U of M, I am trying to fit in the new role in life,
blend in the new surroundings. Compromise, negotiate and fight with myself
and my relevantly irrelevant thoughts. Making ends meet and strike a
balance to rule out the creases and master the tight rope. The SAD exhibition
has started just another constant debate, after smashing few of my believes
it provokes me to ford on a new trail in search of new perspective of thinking altogether.

The sparks of creativity are my lessons from the past. Often they are
concentrated entirety of experiences. I am about to come full to the brim
with them learning to shift them, sort and arrange them, to translate the
abstract into the tangible. They are born to mould them into meaningful
nuances of my creative being.

My primary idea is to take something ordinary and turn it larger than life
on basis of sheer observation. I want to exploit the way my camera sees,
re-emerge with unusual mediums to reinvigorate physical and emotional
dialogue with the viewers. Emotions, storytelling and overall content are
more important than technique for me. As 'light' doesn't have a given form,
it challenges me often to fiddle with. How it might shape in thoroughly
changed atmosphere splitting white light into its complementary colors,
overlapping reflections and transmission to create color speaking patterns.
My new venture is to engage pixels while editing to break my own boundaries
of visualization. I endlessly wish to apply this as my ideal pallet.

I respect all the good work out there by known and unknown artists. Still I
trust my silent dreams. Their uneven, almost jarring content is waiting to
be brought alive.

Rob Lyksett

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My name is Rob I’m 18 years old, starting my 3rd year of classes at the University of Minnesota (I took a bunch of PSEO and CIS classes and whatnot); this is my first year living on campus and being enrolled full time. It’s a big change of pace, and Im still adapting to the full college experience, but really finding myself loving a lot of it. I am undecided on exactly what I want to do for my major, but I definitely want to do something within the field of digital imagery and animation.

I am passionate about drawing, visual design, and animation. I have done a lot of work with graphics and imagery in the past, and want to use my time at the university to go in depth to the study of digital imagery and animation programs like photoshop and flash (so, this is a great class for me!). I have a lot left to learn, but I’m very excited to get going. I am beginning to (or hoping to) get my feet wet with study in cartooning, advertising art, graphic design, and medical animation, all of which are very interesting to me. A friend of mine does 3-dimensional animation for the Minnesota Vikings, and he has been one of my most inspirational and helpful career advisors.
Ok so there’s all the generic stuff, but I could still tell you a bit more about myself. The most important thing in my life is the people I love; my family, my girlfriend, and my friends. I would not be the person I am today without them, and I am thankful to have them in my life every day.
I come from the southeast suburbs of the twin cities, and I went to high school in a small charter school up near Rosevile (one of the best experiences of my life, as it helped me get exposed to lots of new things, meet AMAZING people, and offered lots of great options to me like PSEO).
I like to spend my free time drawing, doing martial arts, and playing music. I love to watch movies too, especially stuff with good animation/special effects. My favorites have got to be Jurassic Park, Spiderman 2, Constantine, Sin City, and then of course some great comedies like Jay and Silent Bob, Harold and Kumar, Young Frankenstein, and Superbad.

Sean Kapisak

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I was born in White Bear Lake, Minnesota. I am 20 years old.
Currently I am a junior at the University of Minnesota studying Computer
Science. I come from a large family. I have four brothers and three
sisters, ranging in the ages of 5 to 27 years old.

At a young age I noticed my grandfather painted a lot. He was a hunter and he liked
to do very realistic paintings of various ducks in the wild life. I believe this helped
me influence my own interest in art and I have always liked it and enjoyed
doing it since an early age.
While a lot of my current studies and classes have a lot to deal
with programming, both the style and structure of it, as well as abstract
thinking and math, I have always had enjoyment with painting and drawing. I
am hoping when I am done with my studies at the University of Minnesota
that I feel fulfilled in both these different aspects of my learning. This
is both my first Art class at the University and my first Digital Art class
ever. I hope to learn a lot about it so that one day I can pull both of
these areas together to find something that I enjoy and would work on in a
career.

Ian Hanlon

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My name is Ian Hanlon, and I was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I lived in Chicago for the first few years of my life, but have been in the Milwaukee area since. I am pretty much the average college student who had an average upbringing.

I guess one important thing to know about me is that I am very determined when I want to accomplish something, and I am very passionate about the things I like. I am very open to new things and enjoy a lot of different activities, but there are a few things in my life that I don’t just have a liking to, I mean I really like them. Some of these include important things like my family, friends, and religion, but a lot of them are simple like places, bands, sports teams, and even television shows. Most people that are as little as acquaintances of mine know about my obsessions with the Green Bay Packers, Hawaii, 24, Matchbox Twenty, and country music. It’s not like I make a point to let people know how much I love these things, it just happens…no matter what. I am proud of who I am, and the things I do. I have always loved making little movies with my friends, and I think that is the main way I release my creativity. I have never been a real artist…I have played a few instruments, but never really excelled at them, and I am not too talented in the drawing or painting departments, so making movies is really the one thing I enjoy doing when it comes to creating things. I love being around people and making them laugh. I aim to make everyone happy, and sometimes it causes problems that I don’t intend to happen. It is a lot like Borzi’s “I’ll Call You? mural from the SAD exhibit. I will do everything I can to make friends and family happy, and it involves making a lot of promises, in turn causing me to break some every now and then. Keeping my word is one of the most important things to me (like Jack Bauer :) ), and I feel that it’s inexcusable not to. I am usually in an unusually happy mood, and I like to keep things pretty simple.

Tiara Carlson

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Hello, my name is Tiara Carlson. I was born in a small town in northern Minnesota called Mora. My mother was 17 at the time and dropped out of high school so she could support the two of us.

We lived on a 60 acre farm with her grandparents, who helped raise me. When I was young, I was always outside. We had 26 dogs, 7 horses and some cows, so there was always trouble/fun to be had. Eventually, my mother met a guy named Dave, who she has been dating for the past 15 years. He's the man I consider to be my father. I also have a half-brother named Sage whom I love to death.
Throughout my life I've moved around a lot, and I've met a lot of different people.This has really helped me become a very open and accepting person. I was also forced to "grow up" at an early age, and face the realities of the world long before most of my friends and peers ever did. I'm grateful for all the experiences I've had, the good and the bad, am content with the person that I am today.
As for my interests, I have many. I'm extremely interested in pop-culture and the media. I always find it amazing how people are affected by the media and the power it holds over them. My greatest passion is probably for film. I do whatever I can to involve film into my everyday life. If I had to choose a favorite movie, I guess I would have to say The Godfather. I also love comic books and graphic novels; Batman and the X-Men are two of my favorites.

Brice Aarrestad

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Brice Aarrestad
Senior Undergraduate Architecture

Music is my life. It began with my family. My father is a conductor and music educator. My mother is a talented vocalist. My older brother is a drummer in three rock bands and making plans to relocate to Nashville to progress as a performer. My little brother, who is in 6th grade, just started playing trumpet. And I play lead trumpet in the U of M Marching Band and Jazz III Bands.

The connection between art and architecture is prevalent and easily observable. I, however, am interested in exploring a connection between architecture and music. I am interested in creating environments with traditional materials and with sound. I have been influenced artistically by the improvisation of jazz musicians and the effortless freedom of the best performers. I would like to record this freedom and effortless musical expression as a building. Architecturally I am drawn to the work of Diller + Scofidio (Blur Building in Switzerland especially), Zaha Hadid’s built work, and always Frank Gehry. With these architects, the idea is the cornerstone and the thoughtful expression of the idea is seemingly limitless. This is much like a jazz soloist where the chord changes construct the idea and the expression of the musician is bound only to the idea of the chord structure.

Placement Gallery 2

Among the artists at the Obsessive Compulsive exhibit I enjoyed the art of Melissa Gahagan. All of her drawings have a unique fluid movement in them, even if what’s depicted is a stationary object.

Just as in Nick Howard’s case, Gahagan’s drawings all seem to take place in a fantasy world of her own design. As I was looking at the drawing titled “Home,? I was reminded of the animated French film Fantastic Planet. There’s a sequence in the movie that involves a young man who doesn’t understand the dangers of his surroundings, and is almost killed by a tentacle like creature that looks like the tree in “Home.? The way the people are portrayed also reminded me of the movie. They seem so small and nymph-like, especially in the drawing titled “All Tied Up.? The scene looks like it was taken from long ago, when people would dance (sometimes naked), under the moonlit sky, like in ancient Greece. I’m taking a Greek mythology class right now, so that’s why I thought of Greece specifically. I also love the giant birds in comparison with the human bodies. It adds a mystical feel to the drawing “Rootsr.? It almost looks like the giant bird is attached to the branch or rock itself. It looks like it’s all connected. Also, all of her drawings seem to take place at night or maybe in a foggy or dusty place. There’s an overall somber tone to her work. It gives off the sense that there’s more going on around the central image, and it’s left up to the imagination to figure out what that is.

Placement Gallery 1

There was a lot of great work at the Obsessive Compulsive Drawing exhibit, and I was really impressed with what I saw. Each artist had a unique style and approach to their art and it was really interesting to see them displayed together.

The artist who intrigued me the most was Nick Howard. There’s something startling and twisted about his drawings. The creatures are human-like in form, but are bent and manipulated enough so as to make them inhuman.
The first thing I was reminded of when saw “Book Page 34? was the movie Yellow Submarine. Howard’s creatures reminded me of some of the creatures The Beatles meet on their journey in the Yellow Submarine. I specifically remember a pair of kinky boot beasts that were fighting each other as The Beatles sail on by. They had great big mouths and tons of triangular pointy teeth. They also reminded me of some of the Blue Meanies they encounter when they’re trying to rescue Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. This specific drawing has a human-like creature smiling with four mouths filled with pointy rows of teeth. The creature is wearing a black cloak and matching Quaker hat. This drawing is almost identical to the one titled “Inescapable #1.? This figure is wearing the same outfit but has only three mouths, all of which seem to be grimacing. Howard has created an entire fantasy world that seems to be filled with a lot of drama and pain. This could be how Howard views the real world, and that people actually look like those creatures to him.

Documenting China Response

China’s change from an agricultural, rural society to a more urbanized way of life is truly amazing. It has happened so quickly and the effects of this process were brilliantly portrayed in the Documenting China exhibit at the Weisman.

I always love learning about other cultures and societies and I feel that this exhibit allows me to look at what’s “real life? in China. Most people only see the bright lights and tourist attractions, and have no idea who’s behind it all, who makes everything work in China.
The photographs taken by Zhou Hai are extremely powerful. They tell the story of what it’s like to be a worker in China (which seems to be a large portion of those who went to the cities for work). Everything looks dirty and polluted, and the workers don’t have adequate clothing or protective gear to protect themselves from it. Factory workers are underpaid and overlooked by their society. The photo titled Hebi, Henan, taken in 1999, shows a man carrying an apparently heavy sack, and he’s completely covered in some sort of dirt or dust. He doesn’t even look like a man, he looks like a soot creature of some kind. His clothes look thin and unprotective. It amazes me how such hard-working people, who put their lives at risk, can be treated so horribly by their own countrymen. This sad fact however, is not only applicable to China; this sort of treatment of factory workers occurs all over the world.
Another photo that spoke to me was one of Zhang Quzi and her two daughters taken by Jiang Jian in 1996. It shows a mother and her daughters in their tangwu, a rural Chinese living room. The mother is smiling, but it’s the faces of the daughters that caught my eye. They look unhappy, and their eyes look sad and tired. It looks like they have lived a hard life, which I’m sure they have. The caption said that the one-child policy is still in effect, but that many rural families don’t report the births of girls. I wonder if the attitude towards women has changed at all since Mao, and if it hasn’t, if it ever will.

September 10, 2007

Archive Clip









Hello, this is at little clip that is about 3 mins and 20 secs long. I got the clips and the music from a very reliable site calle archives.org. This clip is mainly about what humans beings are able to do if the train. So it is mainly about a group of people doing kung fu and flips. I choose the music and it is called "flawless." hopefully it matches the clip. Oh and the group of people are called Team Ryouko. I was mainly inspired by a music video on Youtube that (I believe) was created by Fort Minor. So hope you enjoy the clip, it was very hard to do and I kept messing up a lot.

Studio E

Studio E,

It's really exciting the studio and all of that equipment is available to
us. We learned about the different lights in the studio and the gels that

can accompany the lights. Unfortunately I had a constant cough that was
really distracting, I had to leave the room for water a couple of times.

Jameson

Jameson,

Jemeson posed the question "what is art, is someone working in technology
or digitally really an artist?" At the of his stay e answered it buy saying

it doesnt really matter how you define as long people are touched. In
between hi question and answer he expressed his excitement about the
digital camera and he showed his personal pictures.

Maricio

Maricio,

Maricio spike of three projects he worked using the flash program. He
stressed that he uses flash as a tool to do his work. He also spoke of

scripting as being a large part of the program and that it is a component
we should learn. A good suggestion he gave was to learn all of the free
tutorials on line before buying a book on flash, because you may want to
buy a specialized that specializes in one area of flash.

Placement Gallery

Ben Boylan, Every Coldest Winter Balance, Ink On Found Wood

It first I could not believe what I was seeing. A little character guy on some found wood. I could not believe it because I wrote down the materials wrong. I read the materials as “Ink found on wood?. I thought what a cool thing, this guy named Ben found this art and decided to share it with the masses. How unselfish of him. Then my

dad told me to read the materials again “Ink on found wood?. That’s very different, isn’t it. My bad.
I still choose this piece to write on because the fact it looks like a doodle that someone just did on the fly. It is very simple, just a piece of wood with a pen drawing of a skinny folded over man that looks as if hes had enough of it all. The guy holds his head between his hands as if to scream, aaaaaaaahhhhhhh! My first reaction to this guy was to laugh. Everyone has felt that way before, I can relate. Ben Boylan really brought out the look of someone being at their witts end. Created by just a piece of throwaway looking wood and a pen.
I understand now why I may have transposed the words to be “Ink found on wood?. I myself am a guilty doodler, put a pen in my hand some of my morals go out the window. I think I wanted the materials to be “Ink found on wood? not “Ink on found wood?, because it meant I had some shared guilt in the pleasure of doing something a little naughty. Like writing on a piece of wood, in pen.

flipbookprocess

When I started my flipook I was really excited about my cool idea of a
venus fly trap eating bugs, and then a big foot comes down and stomps on
it. But it became too time consuming, and the book kept falling apart. I
bought a new book and used a more simple design and was still able to use
the foot stomping idea.

Final









Enchanted Exhibit

When I first walked in the gallery I thought it was going to be boring because I didn't see anything that caught my eyes right away. But when I turn around the corner I saw this sculpture that was awesome.

This sculpture was made by Roxanne Jackson and is call "Devouring Mother." To me seeing something like this is cool because I like to see artwork that have something that deal with monster or the devils. I found this great because when I first saw the sculpture it remind me of a horror movie that I saw where they where to get infected and when the monster was trying to take over the body it would come out somewhere in their body, for this sculpture it would be there mouth. I was amazed on how the artist was able to make a lot of detail in the sculpture too.

BA BAF Exhibit

Looking at the artwork in the hall way in the building was very fun and interesting. The one that caught my eyes when i first saw it was the piece call "Through the Doorway."

"Through the Doorway" was drawn by John Phillipich. It was made from charcoal on a live size peace of paper. The reason why I found this drawing to be so interesting was its size. This drawing was a drawing of a door opening half way, with the room pitch black. This drawing can make the viewer feel like there a door right in front of you and make you wonder what is inside of the dark room. What I also liked about this drawing was how the artist was able to make the door look all old and crack, that I found it to be really interesting. This artist is able to use the charcoal really will with all its light and dark on the drawing.

BA BFA Exhibit

I found the BA BFA Exhibit to be very enjoyable. It contained a lot of great pieces of work that I a great time looking at. There was a multitude of styles and ideas that the students expressing. I choose to write my response on a piece created by Pa Houa Lee in 2007 called “Murder in the Womb.?
This piece of art was created with mixed media. It became very apparent right away that Lee took this piece of artwork a step forward in the way it was presented to the viewer. A series of seven images were created depicting a set of twins in a mother’s womb. This images were placed on a black box with a clear background, and inside there was a light source that illuminated the dark pictures for a clearer view. It gave the sense of these images being scans that were taken in a doctor’s office.
In the first image, the set of twins appear very innocent. Over the coarse of the next couple, the twins appear to have a confrontation where they kick each other. The twin on the left then puts his back to the other twin. In the last set of images it is shown that the twin on the right takes the umbilical cord and wraps it around the other twin, strangling him. The twin being strangled has one hand reaching for his neck, and the other outward as if reaching for help.
These set of images and the way they were presented give a great insight on the artist’s work. I enjoyed how this story was being told to the viewer, and I believe Lee did a great job expressing it.

Enchanted Exhibit

The Enchanted Exhibit was a great experience that brought many varieties of artist media on this specific theme. As I walked through the exhibit hearing the sounds of birds chirping, I saw both fairy tale styles of work and some more devilish. I chose to write my response on one of the first pieces of work someone would see as they walked into the exhibit. It was created by Erik Ullanderson called “C-36?.
This piece of work was one of the most brightest in the exhibit. It almost gave the effect of being too bright in my eyes. It contained a platter of color, glitter, holograms, stickers, metal foil, and vinyl prints. This piece of work was a collaboration of rectangle pieces of artwork with each specific piece focusing on one idea. Some of these contained specific objects like Disney characters (Snow White, Cinderella, etc.) that contained a ripple effect around them that outlined their shape and gave a ripple effect to emphasize that object. There were also pieces of vivid landscapes that were created. One such example was a forest background that was formed into a waterfall. The forest texture was used to represent the water, where Erik added images of the rocks on top of it to give the feel of a waterfall.
Overall I found this piece to be very eye catching and interesting. It contained a lot of images that were incorporated into the theme of “Enchanted?. It helped represent a world that is colorful, chaotic, and magical.

Chambers Response

I thought that the Chambers Hotel was a really visually stunning place to be. I enjoyed looking at almost everything I saw. Even the tables and chairs were really cool. One piece of art I really enjoyed was the bull/pig head thing. It was kind of creepy, and it was there to greet you at the front desk. My favorite piece was Spin Art by Damien Hirst. It was really bold and colorful, and it gave me a happy feeling when I saw it. I think it's really great that we have a hotel like this in Minneapolis. Hopefully people will enjoy and appreciate it.

Patrick Holbrook, Deep Pop Songs

Patrick Holbrook, Deep Pop Songs, 2008, Videos,Soda pop, pump, vinyl
tubing, and buckets

I viewed many of Patrick's work and realized that it is very complex
appropriation before I finally thought that I could finally take a stab at
responding to Deep Pop Songs, 2008, Videos,Soda pop, pump, vinyl tubing,
and buckets. The site shows two videos, one on the fans of the band The

Smiths speaking of their fan-ship, and the other at a grocery store showing
two liter pop and the noises they would make if you beat them
consecutively. There is a photo of a bucket representing a deep lake water
cooling system, and another photo of video screen showing something I could
not make out. Also he includes about a page of explanation of the entire
work.
Even though he gives an explanation it is still difficult for me to
translate his ideas. I can tell that the different ideas all coming
together is a complex one, but also the the different ideas seem very
random to me. He does find a way to link the ideas together though, and I
come to the conclusion Patrick Halbrook may be some kind of genius for
even recognizing that these very random elements can come together and have
a connection.
I think the meaning of this work is to show the non mainstream ideas.
He mentions that pop was kind of a no-no while growing up, the Smiths are
and alternative band, even the pump system is an alternative type of
cooling system.
Watching the videos I also noticed that there was an alternative
element to the films themselves. In the store-pop video there is a hand
lightly smacking all the bottles down the shelf line. I think that would be
considered by the mainstream as a slight no-no. In the Smith's fan video I
noted that the fan's seemed to be not your average looking Smith fans. I
don't mean to start a stereotype, my point is that I think Patrick did this
on purpose. It's like hes showing another level, there is an alternative to
the alternative.

Enchanted Exhibit

Dina Shpungin. Catch And Release, 2007, Video

Usually I just skip the video stuff when I am in a museum. The day I went to the Nash Gallery should have been no different. In fact I was in a hurry and had not even gotten this assignment yet. So I really intended to just look at the ‘pretty pictures’, and be on my way. But when I entered one of the rooms in the Enchanted Exhibition I saw a woman kissing a frog!

This of course was the most interesting ‘video stuff’ I have ever seen in a museum and I just had to write about it. Dina Spungin’s Catch And Release video shows a woman by a pond at night in a billowy nightgown. The woman goes to the pond and grabs a large frog out of the water; she then takes a colored magic marker and colors the frogs white underbelly. She turns the frog over and kisses him and throws it back into the water. She goes back to the pond, catches another frog and does the same thing using a different colored magic marker. The whole video goes through about five or six different frogs. What the hell is going on here?
Because I was struck with how bizarre this video was, it took me a couple of frogs to pick up on the whole ‘kissing a frog to get your prince’ connection. I think the coloring with magic marker on the frog’s bellies confused me. I later read the description of this work and it did mention that the coloring links to finding the frog again or prince. The description also noted that the girl had many tattoos and the artist made a link to her tattoos and coloring the frogs. But I don’t find these links important to why I was pulled into this video.
I was attracted to this video because it was so weird. I thought look at this feminine girl kissing a slimy frog, and she does not seem one bit disgusted. Then she draws in marker on his belly. This made me think ‘poor frog that can’t be healthy for him, does PETA know about this? These thoughts are what made me stay and watch the video until the end and until I finally got the charming prince connection.

Michael Krueger. Xtra-Credit

The title of the artist's talk was Michael Krueger. Prints Drawings
and other things. And that was a true explanation to what the experience
was but I would add one more aspect to the title "and influences". I think
that was an important part of the lecture that I took away from Michael's
presentation.

Michael says most of his work is narrative. Which I did not understand
until he showed us a piece based on old video games. It had the donkey
kong, and the mortal combat character in it. Two very different video game
guys. By bringing these two together a different story or feeling is
created. This I think is appropriation. much of his works were found things
that he either transformed or combined with other art works to create a new
narrative. Like his old high school notebook designs.
Michael found his old notebooks from high school which he had totally
doodled on the covers and throughout. He was a big heavy metal fan and he
recently added other images to his old books. He spoke of how he is really
interested in history and how he realized that in high school much of the
stuff taught is false. He was really influenced by this idea and would add
allot of Patriotic or war images over his Pink Floyd, and Alice Cooper type
tributes.
During his lecture he mentioned more influences such as folk and blues
music, Early American Photography, Henry Darger, Goya and many more. Every
time he would present his work he would say what his influence was. He
suggested that students should find artist's that inspire them. When he
studies the artist's that he likes he gets inspired to his own work.
I am really glad I went to this event. Michael had a great sense of
humor and was entertaining. But the important message I would not have
gotten had I not attended is this. I should recognize my influences much
more than I do. I should study them and allow myself to be influenced by
them. This will help me to be inspired to produce.

BA BFA Exhibit

John Phillipick. Through The Doorway, 2007, Charcoal

When I rounded the corner to the art building I was not immediately drawn to John’s work. I saw the color pieces next to his and looked at them first. Normally realistic work is my thing, and that is what Through The Doorway, created in charcoal is. I think the fact that Phillipick’s piece is a black and white is what did not initially attract me.

His work was definitely realistic looking dimensionally, and reading the description of John’s art does suggest that realism is one of his goals. Through The Doorway is a life size representation of an open door created with charcoal on paper. John hung his work so that the bottom of the door meets the floor, this further adds to the illusion of reality. But I think there is one more thing he should of done to make this art look really trompe l’oeil.
He should have added color! Although the art building is made up of mostly black, white and shades of grey, an artist can always see shades of color in these building elements. Using color would have made the door even more realistic looking. One of Phillipick’s goals I think was to trick people into thinking this was a real door. If charcoal does not come in color I think he should have used a different media. Had he done this I think I may have been originally drawn to his work first, rather than the color pieces I viewed before his.
But I do not want to be to mean sounding about this. After all I was attracted to this piece and did choose his art to write about over all others. I do want to say that I thought that the door was rendered very well. It was an old wood door that he added a crack in, which did look very realistic. I think that I am learning something about myself doing all of these response writings. I have a critical nature! I write about what I find wrong with works a lot. I hope this is not a character flaw

The Festival of Appropriation

Appropriation is an important historical practice in art-making, in
which the artist uses a previously existing form, image or sound in new
ways. The creative effort is defined by the inspired selection and
manipulation of found materials. The end result is a strangely familiar,

yet altogether new creation.1 I add this definition from the Soap Factory
website for two reasons, one is I had no idea what appropriation was, and
the second I think it is a very good explanation an explains very well what
this exhibition is about.
When I walked into the room of the show I could see and hear that the
artist mediums include many varieties including film, stuffed animals,
collage, sculpture and more. I found myself gravitating towards things that
I thought were pretty, or humorous. Like Michael Thomsen's work, God Clock,
Mixed Media,created in 2007.
His piece is a beautiful jumble of lights, religious images, gold
gilding, bull horns, and other nick knacks. Mostly all done in jewel
tones. The piece seems both political, religious, and meaningful in other
ways I can not explain.
I also liked the way the exhibit was curated. There were about four or
five rooms and I was excited to see that they put more of Michael Thomsen's
work in a room later in the show. Many of the artists work was displayed in
more than one area. I liked this set up better than putting all of one
artists work in one place. It was like a nice surprise to see something
later on in the exhibit that I recognized, I felt artist knowledgeable. I
was able to say. "Hey there's Michael Thomsen's work, hes my favorite."

BA BFA Exxibit

John Phillipick. Through The Doorway, 2007, Charcoal

When I rounded the corner to the art building I was not immediately drawn to John’s work. I saw the color pieces next to his and looked at them first. Normally realistic work is my thing, and that is what Through The Doorway, created in charcoal is. I think the fact that Phillipick’s piece is a black and white is what did not initially attract me.

His work was definitely realistic looking dimensionally, and reading the description of John’s art does suggest that realism is one of his goals. Through The Doorway is a life size representation of an open door created with charcoal on paper. John hung his work so that the bottom of the door meets the floor, this further adds to the illusion of reality. But I think there is one more thing he should of done to make this art look really trompe l’oeil.
He should have added color! Although the art building is made up of mostly black, white and shades of grey, an artist can always see shades of color in these building elements. Using color would have made the door even more realistic looking. One of Phillipick’s goals I think was to trick people into thinking this was a real door. If charcoal does not come in color I think he should have used a different media. Had he done this I think I may have been originally drawn to his work first, rather than the color pieces I viewed before his.
But I do not want to be to mean sounding about this. After all I was attracted to this piece and did choose his art to write about over all others. I do want to say that I thought that the door was rendered very well. It was an old wood door that he added a crack in, which did look very realistic. I think that I am learning something about myself doing all of these response writings. I have a critical nature! I write about what I find wrong with works a lot. I hope this is not a character flaw

Documenting China

Documenting China Response

The photographs in this gallery are all really dark and depressing. The use of black and white really add to the seriousness of the pictures. They are discussing progress and transition in China, but the subjects look like they are fairly reluctant to change. I think they do a very good job of showing people who don’t want to become a modern country, but are forced to work in factories and live in crowded cities. I especially like the picture with the lady holding her forehead. She looks so frustrated. I think the images say a lot about what life in China is like.

Appropriated Film

Past, President and Future
A comment on the presidential past, the current election and the possible future








Flip Book Process

When creating the original idea for my flip book I received a lot of ideas from
the websites that were given to us. Some of my favorites included flip book
animations where the animation didn't get stuck in the "side-view"
look that we sometimes see quite frequent. I included this point when I had
the ball fly towards the viewer in my own animation. My original idea came from
an image that I had brought into photoshop on the first project where a soccer
player was in mid air hitting a ball. I decided to work off that.

Sean Kapisak

Maurico and Jason

Mauricio and Jamison were very helpful and thier insight was much appreciated on my part. Jamison in particular gave a lot of great insight to us; I have a lot of respect for him and got a lot from what he said. He knows a lot about the implication of visual aesthetics and art in the real world and the
power that they pose, he was really speaking from experience to us. Mauricio gave us some good ways to get our feet wet with flash, and he at least offered me a few options for ways to really get familiar with flash. I am particularly interested in learning Flash because it is such a powerful program and there are lots of places where knowing it will be useful to me

Auto Bio Process

In primarily grey colors, this piece is a commentary on right and wrong, black and white and the grey space that we all inhabit. The shillouetted images of me playing the trumpet with doves in flight and a tree coming from my bell are a re-interpretation of the angel and devil on the shoulders as an image of one's conscience. I struggle with some evils and this image shows the struggle as well as the fact that alone I will never beome white as snow. Instead, I will be forced to inhabit the grey.

Flipbook

As for my flipbook, I once again drew from a character I had already
established, focusing on movement and aesthetic. I took my character, a
Japanese gangster (Yakuza) and showed him simply smoking, then tossing his
cigarette in the air and cutting it in half with a sword. I have to say now
looking at it that the animation was very inspired by Japanese animation
mechanisms, such as the dramatic wind tussling his hair and clothes and the
lightening fast cutting motion. I wanted the movements to be very concise
and profound, so I tried to have only a few elements moving at any one time
to call attention to them. Creating the smoke and dust was particularly fun
because added a dynamic sort of dramatic punch, I think.

Final Project and Sound Project Process

This piece has a lot of internal meaning to me. The school alma mater and state hymn “Hail Minnesota? is sung after every gathering of the Minnesota Marching Band whether it’s just a rehearsal, or the last performance of the year. Graduating members get to conduct ‘Hail Minnesota? once as a farewell to the band. This being my 5th year in the band I received priority for when I conduct. I chose the inspection before the last football game of the year. This inspection happens inside the lobby of Northrop mostly due to weather but also because of the acoustics of the space for singing “Hail Minnesota.?


The piece starts with the marching band playing Battle Hymn of the Republic and other songs and cadences fade in. This layering represents the 5 years of memories running through my mind while looking my best friends in the eyes during my one time conducting the band. This is one of the most memorable experiences of my college career. I used a combination of Garage Band, iMovie, and Final Cut Pro programs to create the piece.

Dave Mckean Response

I recently wrote a paper analyzing mthological elements in the film Mirrormask. I had never seen the movie before, but I knew it had been written by Neil Gaiman, whom I love, so I was very excited.

I ended up loving the movie, and I discovered the artist Dave Mckean, who has worked with Neil many times in the past. I guess I hadn't paid much attention to it before. He created all of the art for the movie, and also directed it. I went to his website, and now he's one of my favorite artists. Everything he does is dark and twisted.

On of my favorite shots from the film is of two giants floating in the sky. They appear to be made out of stone but can move freely. They are intertwined with oneanother and have little black holes for eyes. They're so massive, everything else is dwarfed in the shot. It's odd to see such massive beings, that seem to weigh a ton, floating in the air so gracefully.

http://www.mckean-art.co.uk/

His website if filled with amazing images. He paints, draws, shoots film, and does photography. He is an extremely talented man.

Ishal Bohling

What I really enjoy about this piece and some of this artist’s other work that is displayed at this exhibit is the fact that they were painted on plywood. I love the aesthetics of plywood and I think it really enhances the paintings because it adds a temporary quality to them. I felt as if I could peel back the painting and on the next ply there will be another painting to see.

Ishal Bohling Unsteady Recognized Points of Light 2007
Acrylic resin on wood.

Festival of Appropriation 2

Since there was so much that I liked at this exhibit, I had to write about another artist. Anastasia Ward created a bunch of stuffed animals of her own design by stitching together pieces from other stuffed animals.

My favorite out of all of her creations was the one called Narwhal. It sits upright and has short legs and arms. The majority of it is a dirty brownish pink, and its stomach is white. It's arms and legs were taken from a different animal and sewn on. They're not furry, with dark brown finger/toe tips. It looks sort of like an aardvark, but possbily prehistoric. Its very, very cute.

Another one I loved was call Lonet. It looks like a brown bee with big dark brown eyes. It has two purple rings around its abdomen, and has a tiny blue spike for a stinger. It has think pipe cleaner legs that look like they could really grab something. And it has a white belly. The strangest thing, however, is the long dark brown hair that sprouts from the back of its head. Bees don't have hair. Both pieces were made in 2007 with various materials.

Tom Kotik

The aesthetics of this piece are nothing to be desired but content is more important than superficial looks. The piece is speakers mounted on a music stand with low frequency sound playing. What I really liked about this piece was sound becoming tactile and more physical. I really enjoy work that attempts to make music more physical. I also enjoy the artist’s method of making sound visual as opposed to visual art becoming audible.

Tom Kotik Untitled (for Jon) 2007 Music stand, Stereo, Carpet, Low frequency sound.

Sound Project

When I was a little girl my mother would play a radio show for me at night, I think it was caled 'Mystery Theatre'. The show was a little scary but made up entirely of sound. I wanted to recreate that childhood memory. I call it:
Scary Narrative








Documenting China

The Documenting China exhibit was not exactly what I expected when I went over to the Weisman Art Center. I was surprised to find the entire exhibit to be photographs. I found the exhibit to be very interesting nonetheless. In my opinion, every single photograph sort of tells a story. They do a really good job of expressing the lifestyle of the individuals in each picture. For example, the photo of the elderly lady by Jiang Jian shows a lot about the woman's environment. She is bundled up in heavy clothing, so it appears she is in a cold climate. Also, the woman has very few belongings around her. There are a few pictures on the walls, but nothing fancy. The furniture looks to be pretty worn down too. Looking at all of the different photos, I see a lot of different kinds of lifestyles, and changes through time. They range from old, run down photographs of people who appear to be struggling to get by in life, to modern, well-kept, people with contemporary architecture in the background. It is very cool how this exhibit really is like a timeline of Chinese history and culture. I think it can teach a lot to those who really observe the photographs.

Spider Eats A Man









Walker Response

Walking into one of the large rooms inside of the Weisman, I gazed to my
right to find a video projection of what I recognize as the typical Minnesota
wilderness during springtime, after a harsh and cold winter. The sight of it
brings a cold, yet warm feeling.

Seeing the picture brings back memories of
the many seasons that have come and passed living in my home town, but it
also reminds me of the frigid winter nights and the desperation to see summer
once again. The sun going down before the afternoon is over, the long
chilling nights, the cloudy days with not a drop of sun in the sky, the
winters in Minnesota can be bitter-sweet.
All of a sudden, the screen is black, bringing back the feeling of no sun in
a cold winter’s night in Minnesota. I continue to watch the screen as
gradually, that same picture of springtime in Minnesota begins to appear
again, this time with the shredding of the black overlay. After watching the
screen for a while, you begin to notice (if you know anything about hunting
or guns), that the picture of springtime in MN looked to be deer hunting
grounds. The longer I look at the shredding of the black overlay, I being to
see that it is black paper of some sort, and it looks like bullets from a
shotgun ripping at the paper as it reveals more and more of the picture with
every shot. Watching the picture develop from the blackness, I began to
realize that the diminishing black paper is kind of like winter diminishing
in a way. Winter can sometimes be a dark shroud over life, everything green
is covered in snow, all trees are as naked as can be, all animals and humans
are in hibernation, but when springtime comes along, it shows its head little
by little. The black paper to me is a representation of the shroud of
Minnesota winter, the bullets from the shotgun being fired and destroying the
black overlay—Nature allowing spring to breakthrough the ice and snow of
winter.
The fact that this project used a 12-gauge hunting rifle (firing 376 shots
total) and what looked like hunting grounds really reminds me of Minnesota,
being a child of a father who hunted. The black overlay of paper and the
project of destroying it reminds me of the feeling of when summer starts to
come around, excited and happy, as spring slowly but surely kicks the
depressing feelings and snowy days of winter out the door until the next
year. Overall, I think this project was a good representation of what
Minnesotans go through psychologically every year, going through 7-9 months
of dark and cold days, depressing and sedating, and then we slowly see the
light at the end of the tunnel, springtime poking its head through…promising
another glorious summer.

Festival of Appropriation response

Festival of Appropriation was not what I expected it to be at all. It was very interesting mainly because it had many artist mediums including film, 
collage, sculpture and stuffed animals. I found it quite interesting that stuffed animals was considering art.

Then again my own knowledge of art is very limited as well. So I really have not right to criticize the artwork that was done. I just found it different that stuffed animals could be considering art. There were a lot of artist I have never even heard of before but the one that mainly caught my attention was Micheal Thomsem. It was called God Clock and it was mixed media created in 2007. I do not know why I was really drawn to this artwork. Maybe it was the gold gilding that gave me a warm feeling. Maybe that was the reason why, it kind of gave me a calm and made me stop. Mainly why is that I was in a rush to get home, but God Clock just made me stop and think.

Yeah I don’t really know as to why I really stopped to look at his artwork. It seems religious and I tend to move away from artwork like that. It was mainly because I don’t like that kind of artwork. I like the beauty of the art and tend to avoid thinking too hard on the meaning. I also went to the website and look at other works done by him and it made me say, “what in the heck is in this dude’s mind?? I was really strange and different, but unique. One of his artwork was a horse with other items on its back. I thought it looked like something from a game, then again I did not have my glasses. I enlarge it and say the items on the horses back. I would look forward to seeing more of his artwork in the future.

Walker Response

The piece that really grabbed my attention was something that I nearly overlooked until I decided to inspect it more closely. It was called "Who am we?" and made by a Korean-American artist named Do-Ho Suh in 1962.

From a distance it looks like simply a grid of dots on a piece of white paper. When I got closer I realized that they were not dots but actually very small circular portraits of people. This effect was achieved on a four-color offset print. It is clear by the title that the artist's intent by have hundreds of people bland into a uniform picture was to make a point about a lack of individuality of the group. All of the portraits are of Asian faces, presumably Korean. I think that Do-Ho Suh is referring to Korean-American immigrants, and how they are often seen as a unit instead of individuals. The way the portraits are arranged in perfect rows and columns, makes them even more anonymous and impossible to tell apart. I like how the piece forces you to nearly push your nose up against it to see all the details, this makes it almost an interactive work of art. It changes completely from one distance to another.

Response To Flipbook Process

When starting with just trying to figure out what subject would be suitable for a flipbook, I had a overflow of ideas.

Anything you could ever think of that might change in time (which is almost everything in the world) was fair game, which lead me to be stuck with the decision of choosing only one subject. I narrowed my idea down to the idea of documenting something growing and from that point on I decided on a tree. At first my idea of what I was going to do was very elaborate and detail oriented, and not to long after I started the process of creating my flipbook that I realized that I may be in over my head if I do as much in the piece that I originally wanted and it wasn't realistic for the amount of time that I had to accomplish this task. During the process of drawing out every page in my book, I gained a better perspective on animation and the work that goes into it, as well as I gained a larger respect for animators. The very drawn out process of creating an animation takes a lot of time, effort, and a certain temperament. You must be very patient and precise when trying to do this, for the slightest mistake in one of the frames can throw off the piece, as well as if you don't have a steady hand and find it hard to replicate frame after frame, when animating your flipbook, it will come out very shaky and not as fluid as it should be.

Is This Peace Really Political

At the Walker Art Center an interesting work by Chris Ofili caught my eye. It appeared to be a large mosaic wall hanging made from brightly colored tiles, mostly vivid blue hues. In the center of the piece was a brown softball size dirt glob with a giant eye affixed to it, there were also two more of these brown globs on the floor acting as supports to the large mosaic. Turns out these three brown globs are elephant dung.

I would not have known about the poop part of the art had three students not have come by and said out loud what the material was. The description said nothing about it. Knowing that the work consisted of a beautiful mosaic contrasted by unattractive elephant dookie was the intrigue for me to choose this peace.
About a second after the students revealed the crap, their instructor came up and asked what they thought of the art, their reply “it’s pretty crazy?. The instructor went on to explain that it has political meaning. The artist Chris Ofili had created another artwork that offended some politician so much that that politician dubbed the art the most disgusting or offensive art in history. The teacher said the work at the Walker called Third Eye Vision used many of the same colors as the artist’s other offensive work, and these colors are known in the artist’s foreign country to have political meanings.
When I walked up to this art nothing appeared to be political at all. It actually appeared beautiful and ugly which resulted in humor. One would have to be familiar with the artist, as this instructor was, to know there was any political meaning behind it. But does that make this peace have political meaning? I think not. Especially if you’re basing the art with your eyes not the history of the artist’s other work which pissed off some politician.

Patrick Holbrook response

One of the pieces that I found interesting on Patrick Holbrook’s website is one about the Bayou. I really liked it mainly at first glances it looks like it was about a landscape. I enjoy landscape stuff so it caught my interest the most.

I never knew what a Bayou was before so it was a very informative pieces. I enjoy the little facts about the Bayou. It really helps me try and understand what the clip was about. I really enjoyed how the lighting in the clip made it seem more alive. But I kind of wanted a little more movement. But overall the little clip was enjoyable, mainly because I love landscape stuff epically if it deals with water. Water overall seems to create a calm feeling. The clip of the Bayou gave off the same kind of feeling.

I also really enjoy the words off on the left side of the clip. I really enjoyed reading the words. At first I thought it was describing the Bayou. I then thought I was describing Holbrook’s feelings and thought, but it is not (I think). When Holbrook stated it about how it is somewhat poetic. I really did get that feeling as well. Each one and phrase gave me a calm feeling just like how the Bayou clip did. I really enjoyed this section of Holbrook’s website. I also enjoyed watching White and In Love. The clip was very funny. It was about some guy and in a suit eating a snack and I believe Holbrook jumping around. It was really entertaining. As for the pictures, I found it quite disturbing, in a good way. I was wonder where he took those pictures and did all he do it? I really liked the first picture with the close up. You can see the rough surface that the flour created on Holbrook’s face. A lot of his other works were entertaining as well but those two links caught my eyes the most.

The animation

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Walker Response

I love movies, so I was very excited to see what appeared to be
movie stills in the Paper Trail exhibit. The stills were taken from a
western titled Summer Love.

It was created/directed by Piotr Uklanski, and was released in 2006. Growing up in Poland Piotr had always been fascinated by the American west, and wanted to put his own spin on a practically dead
genre. The story takes place in Poland, with an old west representation
similar to that of the Italian spaghetti-westerns of the 60s and 70s. The
dialogue is in English, but spoken by Polish actors, so it’s accented.
Another neat tidbit is that Val Kilmer has a small non-speaking role as a
dead body.
Since film is my favorite pastime, I try to be as knowledgeable as
I can possibly can, but there is always more to learn and see. My knowledge
of foreign films is significantly less than that of American movies, so I
was very excited to see the stills were from a Polish film. The central
still is white with thick black letters that say “Summer Love-The First
Polish Western,? and in bottom left-hand corner it says “Where life had no
value, death sometimes had it’s price.? That is an awesome line. If that
doesn’t sound intense, I don’t know what does.
Based on what was in the stills, the movie looks beautiful. Rich,
deep golds, reds, and blues surround the rugged polish cowboys in every
photo, except for a couple that look as if the body has been cut away from
the rest of the still leaving the background white. The one I particularly
enjoyed was a close-up of a cowboy, his face is intense and dirty, and he’s
holding a gun in either hand. I also really liked the night shot.
Everything in the still is touched by the night and is tinted blue. It
reminds me of old movies that used blue lighting for night sequences.

BA and BFA response

I did not really like the artwork in Quarter Gallery much. It was mostly sculptures. I enjoy more of painting stuff. I do not mean to dislike sculptures. I do usually enjoy the sculptures but it was the ones that I saw really did not speak to me. I respect the artist who created it but many kind of art like that is not something I like. Well good thing my opinion is not that really important.

The art works that really stood out for me was Nicholas Andreali “You’re Useless, Onion,? and Maggie Zuowshi’s “The Three Graces.? Andreali artwork was something that I could more relate to because it was all done in Graphite Pencil. It was created in 2005. It was more of a cartoon look and I really enjoyed the shading that was applied. I am a big fan of anyone who can shade like that. I feel that it makes the like it has more life and depth in it.

As for Zukowski, that artwork was done by Mixed Media on Canvas in 2006. That artwork was really amazing I really enjoy that one as well. At first I thought it was a painting. There was a lot of dark colors but was in contrast with the bright colors of the skin. It really was bouncing off each other; it kept my eyes moving around. But if I had to choose between Zukowski and Andreali I would choose Zukowski. Mainly because it is a canvas that looks like a painting. I like art that is done with graphite pencil because of shading but shading is also done in Zukowski but in color. Like I said I really enjoy art that involves shading. It is because I have a deep respect for people who could shade with paint because I know it is not easy to mess up.

the animation

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Walker Response

With our visit to the Walker Art Museum I notice a drawing that caught my eyes the first time I saw it.

The drawing is called “House Upside Down,? and was drawn by Laylah Ali in 2000. I think the reason why that drawing caught my eye was because of how Ali drew the house upside down from the surface. What I liked the most from the drawing was the texture of the ground. It’s really cool seeing the different type of soils level there is on the drawing. When started reading the description of the drawing and understood why he drew the house upside down. It seem like I was in the same shoe as his father did when I return to my home town in Wisconsin, where I grew up. Everything change and look so different, the house I use to live it burn down and was built over with a new one, building got bigger, street got bigger and rerouted, everything just look so different.

Walker Response

The piece that really grabbed my attention was something that I nearly overlooked until I decided to inspect it more closely. It was called "Who am we?" and made by a Korean-American artist named Do-Ho Suh in 1962.

From a distance it looks like simply a grid of dots on a piece of white paper. When I got closer I realized that they were not dots but actually very small circular portraits of people. This effect was achieved on a four-color offset print. It is clear by the title that the artist's intent by have hundreds of people bland into a uniform picture was to make a point about a lack of individuality of the group. All of the portraits are of Asian faces, presumably Korean. I think that Do-Ho Suh is referring to Korean-American immigrants, and how they are often seen as a unit instead of individuals. The way the portraits are arranged in perfect rows and columns, makes them even more anonymous and impossible to tell apart. I like how the piece forces you to nearly push your nose up against it to see all the details, this makes it almost an interactive work of art. It changes completely from one distance to another.

walker Response

Appropriated film process

Much of animation is bringing life and movement to inanimate objects. Quote bubbles are used in comic books to communicate for the characters. By emptying the quote bubble you strip away its identity and purpose and it no longer communicates –or does it?

Much of animation is bringing life and movement to inanimate objects. Quote bubbles are used in comic books to communicate for the characters. By emptying the quote bubble you strip away its identity and purpose and it no longer communicates –or does it? The idea behind my silent film “Quote Bubble? is to attempt to capture the gestures and still communicate along side of the comedian.

To create the quote bubble I used a 3D modeling program called SketchUp and exported the animations into Final Cut where I chroma-keyed the bubble and tracked the movement of Eddie Cantor; paying the closest attention to the movement of his shoulders. It still has a long way to go to completely match his movements and cleaning up some of the green screen background elements. I plan on continuing to improve the animation.

Walker Response


I chose to look at a piece called “Unpainted Sculpture? that was created by Charles Ray in 1997. It is a real size sculpture of a 1991 Pontiac Grand Am created from fiber glass and paint. Ray bought he car from a salvage auction, and it appears as depicted in the sculpture that it was in a frontal collision accident.

The reason I chose this work was because it caught my eye in that fact that it was rather large and looked extremely real, other than it having a gray dull paint color painted across every inch of it. It was extremely detailed. While the back half of the car remained completely untouched, the front end and its engine were impacted and smashed inward towards the front seats. The driver door was smashed. The hood of the car had been crumpled together and pushed into the windshield. The front bumper was still clinging on even though it appeared completely dismantled. With all this detail and special attention given on this piece of work, it was hard for me to visualize this actually being a sculpture, but rather a real car that one might be looking at in the crash site.

It was stated at his piece of work that Charles Ray makes something that is so abstract it becomes real and so real that it becomes abstract. I believe he does this very well and in turn creates a power piece of artwork to look at.

Documenting China Response

The piece by Zhou Ming taken in 2002 was very interesting. The photo is composed of bunch small birdcages hanging outside. This is an odd composition because of the placement of cages. Every small sized birdcage I have ever seen has been inside the home, not hung outside of one. The birds in the cages also seem to be common everyday birds you see flying round and not in cages. They might bird beautiful colored birds that are meant to stay in cages but we cannot tell because the photo is in black and white. Also, if these birds were very colorful, then the question yet again arises, why are then outside? In the background, we can see a person biking who appears to also be looking at the birdcages. Perhaps he is wondering the same thing we are. Also, the city in the back does not seem to be the nicest area in town. These cages might seem a little less peculiar if they were hanging from the penthouse loft in a ritzy downtown area. This photo makes you wonder so many things about it.

Documenting China Response

The piece by Zhou Ming taken in 2002 was very interesting. The photo is composed of bunch small birdcages hanging outside. This is an odd composition because of the placement of cages. Every small sized birdcage I have ever seen has been inside the home, not hung outside of one. The birds in the cages also seem to be common everyday birds you see flying round and not in cages. They might bird beautiful colored birds that are meant to stay in cages but we cannot tell because the photo is in black and white. Also, if these birds were very colorful, then the question yet again arises, why are then outside? In the background, we can see a person biking who appears to also be looking at the birdcages. Perhaps he is wondering the same thing we are. Also, the city in the back does not seem to be the nicest area in town. These cages might seem a little less peculiar if they were hanging from the penthouse loft in a ritzy downtown area. This photo makes you wonder so many things about it.

Walker Response

Upon our visit to the Walker Art Center, I found a work of art that is much different than what normally comes to mind when you think of art. It is the Irene Hixon Whitney Bridge. It was designed by Siah Armanji and was built in 1988. It is made of steel, wood, paint, concrete, and brass. The bridge stretches 375 feet long over 16 lanes of streets. The design allows you to be able to see three different types of American bridges combined into one. The yellow is a suspension bridge, the trestle bridge in blue and yellow, and an arch bridge. Along the railings of the bridge is a poem written by John Ashbery. I think the main point of the bridge together with the poem is the idea of transition and moving into a new place. Aside from the transition in going from one place to another, the bridge goes from yellow to blue to symbolize the change with the transition. From below the bridge, it did not seem like anything too special, but once I got to the top and looked down the entire thing, I realized how amazing it actually was. It looks like a tunnel when you look down the entire bridge. I found this to be very different, yet interesting on our visit to the art center.

Sound Project








Walker response

We’ve all heard before that a picture is worth a thousand words, that means this work by Zak Smith is worth 750,000. This work, is composed of 750 individual drawings, paintings, and photographs based on every page of a book. The idea seems absurd. When I first saw it I thought it was a storyboard for a film. The content is varied, a slice of lemon marangue pie, a high heeled leather boot, two guys sitting at a bar, a car accident, and a lot of sexual content. The individual pen and ink drawings appeared at first quickly done, rushed, even scribbled. Some probably were. But through deeper investigation they were all astonishing- all 750.

I found a website where each drawing is scanned and presented in high quality. What is also good about the website is the drawings are presented along with the particular passage they relate to. I spent 5 hours looking at each one. What I noticed was Smith’s attention to the composition, shade and shadow which is important when a picture needs to accurately describe a whole page of writing.

To me the interesting idea about this is the artist had to use the verbal imagery of Pynchon to make the art. It’s not a new idea religious art, movies based on books, and a lot of other art is based on literature. However, it is Smith’s approach to leave no page out that is fresh and incredible.

Archives Clip








Walker Response

Robert K Lyksett
ARTS1601

Reflection on Walker Art Visit: A Simple Analysis of Digital Animation

The visit to the Walker Art center provided us with a good opportunity to view art through modern medium and styles; I was particularly enticed by the piece “Sunday Night, Saturday Morning by Raymond Pettibon.

It clearly expresses several unique implicative meanings and symbolism through the association of images; the artist was definitely trying to get a message across to you (or, as it were, several messages about modern American society). However, I concerned myself not with these implicative meanings, but rather with the visual aesthetics of the piece. This piece is a prime example of how modern digital technology can be used for art. Consequently, these new technologies can create a very different experience for the viewer. “Sunday Night, Saturday Morning? Is an example in which digital animation was used as a creative medium, and as a result it holds very unique stylistic qualities. The movement of the figures has the fluid, yet very artificial, movement characteristic of the digital animation programs that created it (like Flash). The images move seamlessly, but it is a very inorganic, limited type of animation. For example, only specific parts of a human figure move, such as the man holding another at gunpoint who’s only animation is the movement in his head, shoulders, and waist. The figure seems to be anchored at these points and can only move by pivoting on each one. The figure remains entirely rigid except for pivoting on these limited points. So what effect does this have on the overall art piece? It gives it a simplistic kind of movement; more like a moving painting than a cartoon or any sort of true animation, and this makes it feel exceptionally unique, unlike anything else the viewer has likely seen.

Walker Response

Walker Response

Although I have been to the Walker many times in the past, and indeed several times over the last few months, I usually manage to find something new and worthwhile with which to engage my analytic tendencies when I go there. This last time, I noted more than I might have in the past some of the pieces in the permanent collection. Something about 1970's minimalist and abstract art has always put me off, but this day I think it was those same qualities which attracted me. I spent a long time looking over the several works by Donald Judd, an artist I have come to like more and more as I learn about him. I was also transfixed on a piece I had never seen before (admittedly because I had never actually gone in and walked around in that room): Robert Smithson's "Petrified Coral with Mirrors." After thinking about it at length, I am still unable to figure out why it is that this particular piece was so intriguing. It's rather small and unobtrusive, tucked away at one corner of the room, surrounded by other, larger and more colorful sculptures. Maybe I'm just in love with mirrors.


Of the new art exhibited in the Paper Trails gallery, there were numerous pieces which caught my eye. I really liked Zak Smith's "Pictures of What Happens on Each Page of Thomas Pynchon's Novel 'Gravity's Rainbow,'" I guess because the drawing style and the medium (small pages) are similar to what I tend to produce (although with significantly less skill and motivation). I also love Julie Mehretu's work, both her large piece in the permanent collection and her newer works featured in one corner of Paper Trails. Her mastery of architectural drawing coupled with the whimsical use of flurries of lines and colors make for a work of art that must be studied closely to be seen in its whole. But the piece I have always hustled over to see in this exhibit is Olafur Eliasson's "Your House," which consists of an open book that has been cut out to form the inside of a two-story home. I have no idea what he meant to say with this work, but its precision of detail is so exact that I love looking at it and studying its various crevices and corners. I think it's beautiful to think that if the book were closed, there would be a perfect little house inside.
All in all, I enjoy the Walker pretty much every time I go. It seems like there's always something new to observe or analyze.

Jean-Rene LeBlanc Response

When I ran into this collection of Art, it struck me because of the overwhelming feeling that I have seen these pieces before.

Even though I may have not seen this collection of artwork before, I may have seen a similar collection with the same process by this artist once before. Either way, the thing that drew me to these pieces much like the ones I have seen in the past is the realistic way this fictional character is portrayed in. When you first glance at any one of the 5 pictures, you think you are looking at a real person, the closer you look and once you read the artist description, you realize you are actually looking at a computer generated character named Ramboy. Ramboy is actually a picture of an Avatar, which is a character you make-up on your own, with it's own personality, style, and look; each as different as we decide to make them. "Self-Portrait of a Ramboy" by Jean-Rene LeBlanc is a digital print on somerset velvet, which gives the digital print a more soft look, making the character Ramboy much more realistic. The character is a completely nude male, with these large protruding horns coming right out of his scalp. The character also seems to have this uneasy look on his face, which adds to the mystery of the piece. In each piece, the Ramboy holds a different pose, and although you never get a glimpse of his genitalia, you can tell by the body composition that it is a completely naked male. The pictures themselves look like photos of a nude model posing, with nothing in the background except for an Erie darkness. The picture itself draws you into the deep dark mystery that is this character and the unsettling background. The mystery is what really makes these pieces stand out and draw you in.

Walker Response

The eight panels from “Blue Serie? proved Thomas Hirschhorn’s connection with controversy and society. The selections, covered in blue pen and marker, displayed photos, headlines and advertisements from newspapers and magazines.

The pieces utilized pictures of starvation, war, beauty advertisements, death (hangings), guns and thin women. Hirschhorn called his eight selections: A-repeat, Acephale (Headless), BMI (Body Mass Index),
C, Engagement, Globalization from Below, Junior Thesis Senior Thesis, No Society, Profit Warning!, Women Against War.

Personally, these pieces were very moving. Hirschhorn drew blue marker over all the eyes with jagged lines flowing out, as if every person in each of the pieces was crying and seemingly without an identity. Looking at the blue, a color often associated with sadness, I was slightly disturbed but
not enough to think about what Hirschhorn was trying to express. All of the panels concentrated on thin women from beauty advertisements and all had pictures of violent death whether it was starved children, a hanging, or dead bodies from war. I wondered if Hirschhorn was making a connection
between beauty and death. In “BMI?, thin women looked very fraile and close to death. In engagement, a conventionally beautiful woman from a magazine sat next to pictures of guns and blood. I thought about how so many people strive for conventional beauty, buying all the beauty products and plastic
surgery in order to obtain it. It caused me to question if Hirschhorn looked at our society and saw the emptiness and unhappiness of conventional physical beauty.

Also, one of the selections read “haven’t you got something better to do??. I thought this was very interesting. Maybe the author was referring to war and all the death that happens. Does he believe it could be stopped or helped if we cared more about each other than about our physical appearances or ourselves in general? Could things such as the war in Iraq, tragedies in other nations and holocausts that still plague our present day world be avoided if societies were less caught up in temporary pleasures? I’m not sure that’s necessarily true. I think certain issues would definitely be improved from their current state but might not be able to be completely avoided.

I really enjoyed how Hirschhorn formed a unique, artistic connection between beauty and death, despite what ideas he meant to express. It evoked many thoughts, too many to write here and reminded me of the importance of awareness about issues such as war, society, eating disorders, the
emptiness of money and beauty, and death--one of the few, universally certain things for all human beings. Those thoughts however also mirrored the hope and joy I've been blessed to know in my life and lives of others.

My little appropriation project

I call it "Spongebob Matrixpants"









Finil Project








Walker Response

The piece Picture of What Happens on Each Page of Thomas Pynchon's Novel, "Gravity's Rainbow" 2004 by Zak Smith was outstanding to look at as an installation. I also viewed the same images in his book but the installation was a much more powerful piece. It covered an entire wall which makes you realize how many images there really are. It also allows you to more easily start to see the underlying story lines. This piece includes more than 750 small drawings, paintings and other forms of mixed media. The images relate to every page of the novel without following the story line exactly. Although these images are done in many different styles and appear not to relate completely, after viewing the installation for some time, you start to create and understand the story lines. Reoccurring figures start to emerge from the piece. Also, the stylistic abstraction of each image makes it very easy to spend a long time viewing these works. Much of his style is very gestural and done with lines. But one the other hand, he has images that are nothing but stick figures or landscapes. He even has a sculptural piece that could only be shown in an installation rather than in his book. Overall, I could stare at all of the very stylized images for hours to only begin to understand what the actually novel is about.

Nightmare









Autobiographical Image

4Layer3.jpg

Enchanted Response

The exhibit in the Nash gallery titled "Enchanted" has proven to be, at least in some places, a very disturbing exhibit. Particularly, for example, the ceramic sculptures by Roxanne Jackson like "The devouring mother" which feature grotesque images of bloody juxtapositions of human and animal subjects. However, i chose to take a look at a piece that was far less intense, and, as the case me be, more time-based and thus more relative to this class. I watched the film "Chubby Buddy" by Erika Yomens (2003). This is one of the pieces I found most enjoyable in any of hte galleries we went to because I was able to easily follow the solid narrative structure of the film (whereas, more often than not, the films we have seen in galleries were based more on visual association of imagery rather than narrative-based, as "Chubby Buddy" was." There was a main character featured here, supposedly being interviewed, and the content was easy to follow (as I said before, a solid narrative structure more familiar to how I am already trained from prior media experience in Hollywood film, for example.) This film is just as much art as one of those visual-based more "artsy" films is; it takes heavy emphasis in cinematography, for example, in a variety of high and low shots when the main character goes to find the chubby buddy. The visual qualities of the film serve to complement the narrative, not to override it (as those "other" visual-based films often do) For example, waves are shown when the main character talks of a stormy relationship, a camel flapping its gums is shown when he talks about the someone yapping at him. Furthermore, the eyes of an owl open and close the story, bringing the film full circle and serving as a metaphor open for intepretation to add to the narrative. The character, telling of his past and experiences, is immediately relatable to us, and so its easy to get in to this piece and really let it affect you, as the character's story engulfs the viewer.

Appropriated Film

Final Project

Final Project

Final Project

Patrick Holbrook Response

I thought the video Water Music (Song for R. Mutt) was very interesting and creative.

At first when I watched this clip, I was only slightly amused. The water was calming and the tones seemed to compliment that in part. However, the pattern of the tones or music was unrecognizable and puzzling. I watched it a second time and found myself more fascinated with the movement of the water more than the tones. It is not often that I take time to watch water trickling even in streams and rivers and much less down drains. It had a simplicity to it that seemed to appeal more and more with the times I watched.

Afterward, I read the description of it. Holbrook's brief desrciption of the video mentioned the rules he designed in order to make it. This was surprising to me because often people think of art as having few defined rules. In my own art, I tend to use formal techniques (or "rules") however, I usually never make up conceptual rules for a specific work. That was the first thing that caught my attention.

Secondly, the title Song for R. Mutt ("R. Mutt" the name on the famous Duchamp work, "Fountain") and the mention of the drain as a from a urinal jumped out at me. It brought me back to the history of "Fountain" and the questioning of art. (What is art? Is there such thing as the artist's genius?) I felt that Water Song suggests a connection to some of these same questions. The last sentence of his description read:

"An automatic, yet labor-intensive piece of music was created that had little to do with traditional ideas of "self-expression," but instead an expression of my ideology."

The fact that Holbrook recognizes traditional ideas of self-expression directs me to these connections.

I thought the video Water Music (Song for R. Mutt) was very interesting and creative.

At first when I watched this clip, I was only slightly amused. The water was calming and the tones seemed to compliment that in part. However, the pattern of the tones or music was unrecognizable and puzzling. I watched it a second time and found myself more fascinated with the movement of the water more than the tones. It is not often that I take time to watch water trickling even in streams and rivers and much less down drains. It had a simplicity to it that seemed to appeal more and more with the times I watched.

Afterward, I read the description of it. Holbrook's brief desrciption of the video mentioned the rules he designed in order to make it. This was surprising to me because often people think of art as having few defined rules. In my own art, I tend to use formal techniques (or "rules") however, I usually never make up conceptual rules for a specific work. That was the first thing that caught my attention.

Secondly, the title Song for R. Mutt ("R. Mutt" the name on the famous Duchamp work, "Fountain") and the mention of the drain as a from a urinal jumped out at me. It brought me back to the history of "Fountain" and the questioning of art. (What is art? Is there such thing as the artist's genius?) I felt that Water Song suggests a connection to some of these same questions. The last sentence of his description read:

"An automatic, yet labor-intensive piece of music was created that had little to do with traditional ideas of "self-expression," but instead an expression of my ideology."

The fact that Holbrook recognizes traditional ideas of self-expression directs me to these connections.

Studio E

I thought that going to Studio E was a very valuable experience. I'm really
glad we went there. It's great to have something like that available. I was
thinking of doing a green screen, music video project thing for one of my
other classes, so its nice that now I know I have a studio available to me.
I'm very glad we went.

Flipbook Making

The flipbook making process was very tedious. I learned some things that I
should do differently next time including working from the back, so I can
trace each picture to make them look as similar as possible. Also, I should
be ready with enough paper to finish what I have planned. Overall, it was a
very cool experience, and I would like to try it again to see what kind of
improvements I can make.

Jenny Schmid + Patrick Holbrook flash animation response

The work is really interesting. It is a flash animation mixed with cartoons, a green screen shot, and a real life images. It was really different from other kinds of flash animation that I have seen. I have never seen anyone really use that kind of style to do an animation.

It was very different. It was a very active animation. There was a lot going on. It seems like with new characters being put in it has a different story each time. I like the scene shots that were used for the background. I seem to give more life to the cartoons that was mainly just black and white. The use of the music also contributed to the animation making it more alive and active. It had a techno kind of ring to it. I especially enjoy the scene with the young man walking into the green forest followed by a curious melody.

As for the use of colors I thought it was good except with the same scene I did not like the red flashlight. The color did not seem to go well for the animation. It stood out too much and I tended to concentrate more on the red flashlight more then the surroundings of the scene. The second time I saw this scene I looked away from the flashlight and saw more things that were in the scene that maybe stood out because of the flashlight. Maybe the reason why it is red is because it is meant to draw our attention to the flashlight only. But over all I thought the animation was really good. If it were to stand up against all of the flash animation that I have seen so far this one will get the prize for being the most unique. It would standout from the rest but still be good enough to take its place in one of my favorite animation that I have seen so far.

Patrick Holbrook

While looking around the website of Patrick Holbrook and looking at all his
different type of art work, I found one that caught my eyes the most which is
the soda bottle musical.

I found that to be interesting because it was something that is so simple that you hardly though that it could become music. I think the message that Patrick Holbrook was trying to send to us the view was that, with something that so simple that everyone use can become something very lovely such as a music. With just a little imagination you can make something become art.

Lisa Lapinski: Extra Credit Response

It was a confusing yet fascinating experience to listen to Lisa Lapinski speak about her work.

During her lecture she displayed some of her art and talked briefly about it. However, it was challenging to connect her verbal explanations to her art. Much of what she said didn’t quite seem to fit with the art, especially when she said some of her artwork completely lacked meaning. With the use of such powerful and well-known iconography and symbols (the jewelry-holding hands, swastikas, stars of David, etc.), I was tempted not to believe her. There is meaning behind choosing such symbols whether it is to speak about a specific event such as the Holocaust or simply to hold a viewer’s attention. I admired that she read a document of criticism about work that seems to have no meaning and disagreed with it respectfully. I understood that section of the lecture well but continued to wonder why she said some of her works have no meaning.
Although the lecture itself was hard-to-follow, her actual work fascinated me. I found “Nightstand? to be particularly interesting. She said she drew the idea from Shaker furniture which was something I had never considered or thought compelling until seeing “Nightstand?. Also, the use of many mediums- clay, drawings, cement, figures, photography, wood, paint, jewelry hands- pointed to Lapinski’s eye for formal elements. I thought this quality in her work, (that is, variety within unity) proved complimentary to her ideas/inspirations. All in all, despite some of the confusion, her art generally drew from historical, psychological and philosophical ideas, and to me, commented on inspiration; the process of being inspired and the relationships between history, religions, emotions, literature, etc. and their effect upon art.

Speakers and Studio E Response

Reactions to Speakers: Mauricio and Jameson. Response to our visit to Studio E and Cullum.

Mauricio
-I thought Mauricio offered a lot of valuable and interesting information about both Flash and Final Cut Pro. I was very impressed as were many of us with his news idea for the world. That was amazing! I didn't know that Final Cut and Flash were used to do things like that. Previously I thought that it was a different software that made those types of images. While he was here, I used one of the Final Cut Pro tutorials that he suggested. It was very helpful! I highly suggest trying it. If you type "kirupa tutorial" into Google, you should be able to find it.


Jameson
-I didn't get a whole lot of content from Jameson although I did enjoy him coming in. I think he made some important points about not letting technology be the focus of your art or photography but just a compliment to it. He showed some simple but compositionally strong photographs he took with the camera on his phone. It helped me to reflect upon not getting caught up in needing great programs, cameras, computers, etc. in order to make or take powerful photographs/art.

Studio E
-Studio E=SUPER SWEET! I was blown away by what we have here at the U in this studio! It was definitely amazing and I wanted to sit down right away and begin a project/video in that area. Filming live (like the 6:00 news on some channels) especially interests me. Completely clueless to filming with multiple cameras, switching from view to view, editing while filming, I was entirely fascinated. Cullum did a great job describing how we can best learn the technology in that space and the opportunities it allows. I can't wait to get started learning and making a project in our class. I threw it out because I want to make a film there so I'm very excited that everyone else in the class wants to too. Thanks for trying to incorporate it into our semester schedule Cheryl!!

Jamason and Mauricio

We had two guest speakers visit class, and we went on a little trip over to Studio E...

I thought Mauricio's work was very interesting. He had a lot of information
to give about animation and the programs that go along with it.

Jamason was a thoroughly entertaining speaker. His stories and sense of
humor were very enjoyable.

Response to "Utopia"

Response to "Utopia" by Jenny Schmid

I thought that "Utopia" was a really cool animation. I love how it starts
out as a real photograph, then the animated images are incorporated into
it. The music really helps the story move along. I like how he's reading
the book, and it seems like he's surrounded by scenery from his
imagination. It's cool how the people are black and white, but the
surroundings are in color. I like the contrast from animation to real
photos. Very cool.

"Utopia" Response

Response to "Utopia" by Jenny Schmid

I thought that "Utopia" was a really cool animation. I love how it starts
out as a real photograph, then the animated images are incorporated into
it. The music really helps the story move along. I like how he's reading
the book, and it seems like he's surrounded by scenery from his
imagination. It's cool how the people are black and white, but the
surroundings are in color. I like the contrast from animation to real
photos. Very cool.

Animation









Response to Artist Talk: Ta-coumba Aiken

Make-up Response to replace the one from the Soap Factory

November 29, 2007, 7:00PM, MIA

Ta-coumba Aiken, an artist from St. Paul, Minnesota spoke and lead a tour to of his new work in an exhibition titled “Call and Response? at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. He emphasized the importance of inspiration flowing out of a work to the community in order to inspire and encourage.

The works in “Call and Response? incorporated ideas of community in various ways. Not only did Ta-coumba Aiken collaborate with other artists in this exhibit, but even had a work where any viewer was allowed to move around tiles in a mosaic and in doing so collaborated with other viewers and Aiken. I thought it was very interesting that Aiken spoke about his desire for making art and how it centralizes around healing; art as a tool for healing. In many exhibitions I have seen this year, the art seems to question existing ideas for the most part. So it was interesting to see that his work may question, but that his questioning is just the means to a better end: a healed soul. I can see how these ideas connect to the title of the exhibit and made each work compliment the others despite their uniqueness and various “positive energies? as Aiken mentioned. Two works that specifically compliment yet differ from each other were titled “Underwater Love? (2006, acrylic on canvas) and “Call and Response II? (2007, acrylic on canvas). “Underwater Love? depicts a large, red face in the left, bottom corner beneath a blue, collection of faces and bodies which seems to pour out of the red mouth and curl up towards the top of the canvas. This work was fascinating to me due to the amount of energy his brush strokes displayed, not to mention his use of bright colors- in this case, red and blue and even more so, his imagery. “Call and Response II? mirrored the intense energy of “Underwater Love? yet visually, it was quite different. The left half of the rectangle canvas only held black and white paint, while the right half utilized yellow and a bold red that popped. The same energy of the brush strokes and curl of the images towards the top middle of the canvas seemed to match “Underwater Love? with precision. The faces and bodies, however, opposed those in “Underwater Love? and instead of seeming to flow from a source, they each stood on their own expressing individuality. With all the works Ta-coumba Aiken spoke of, I felt that these two works most strongly captured the essence of inspiration and creativity while commenting on harmonic relationships between people. Both also speak of the positive effects of art to heal individuals, groups of people and entire communities.

I could not help but enjoy Ta-coumba Aiken and his work very much! I felt it was a very influential and refreshing exhibit.

Autobiographical Image

something_2.jpg

Chambers Response

Overall, I really enjoyed the visit to the Chamber Hotel. The building itself is amazing, and I loved being able to see art used in such a functional way.

Each piece tied every room together. I loved walking through the hotel not knowing what to expect in the next room or hallway.
I thought it was great that they have a gallery, and that it’s free to check it out. The gallery was showing work by an artist named Jude Tallichet. She had a lot of amazing pieces in the gallery. Most of them were everyday objects cast in bronze or aluminum. There was a bearskin rug that apparently had been her fathers, and she loved it so much she decided to cast it in aluminum. It was so detailed, I could see the rises and falls of the fur, and the teeth were incredibly detailed too.
My favorite piece, however, was titled The Swarm. It was a drawing on the wall, sort of like an incredibly detailed wallpaper. There were tons of tiny flying insects(I think they were butterflies), littering the bottom of the wall and rising up all both corners of the wall. I could almost hear the flutter of the hundreds of wings while I was looking at it. I’m terrified of bugs, but I actually felt calm when I was looking at it. I overheard that they’ll probably just have to tear the paper off the wall, and destroy it for their next gallery. It’s amazing how quickly that art will be destroyed, while I’m sure it took a long time to create. I had no idea this place even existed, and now I’m fairly certain I’ll be going back.

Flipbook Process

When Cheryl told the class about the next project and how it's going to be on a flip book, I was really excited because I always wanted to work on a flip book on the computer but I just don't know how to do it.

While I was working on the flip book I had many idea on what I wanted to do such as, I want to do something that deal with a car engine by starting from the very inside and at the end zoom out and see the whole motor. But when I started to draw it, I found out that it was way to hard because of the many detail that I have to include in the picture, so I decided to do something that deal with sword fighting that is why I came up with my flip book that i made.
I started off drawing my flip book by drawing the pirates boat in the ocean and coming to a island. Then when they land on shore of the beach I draw the pirates coming out of the boat one by one. After that I drew the pirates walking into the jungle to get the gold that they where looking for. When the pirates where about to take the gold away I draw the hero who's protecting the gold swing from the tree of the jungle and come landing right next to the captain. I then draw the protector who then took out his sword to kill the pirates. The captain then took out his too and the duel between the both of them started off for the gold. I draw the combat between both of them by making the person who is attacking first jump into the air and landing his sword with the other person sword on the ground. For showing how the captain die I draw the sword stabbing him in the stomach and him laying dead on the ground. After that I finish off the flip book by the protector chasing off the other pirates.

Appropriated Video-Small Scale Life

A boy is building a snowman with his friends and he comes down with a cold. He goes to bed and has dreams of small scale events immediately followed up by parallel, large scale events. He wakes up in the morning, looks out the window to see his snowman, and the audience discovers he is living a rather small scale life himself.








BA BFA Exhibit

I was drawn to the four paintings done by Rebecca Walpole because of the visual texture of the piece. I have seen them for a few weeks now and I always thought of them as depicting birds and feathers. Especially the one titled Seethe which looks like eggs in a nest. I read her description of the work and was surprised it was fire in four different forms. The surprise for me was that she considered the form and shapes of fire but the colors of fire were not as important. Color took a back seat to the tactile essence of fire and I appreciate this approach instead of yet another recording of flame.


Rebecca Walpole 2007 Oil on Canvas Incitement, Seethe, Engulf, Rapture.

Visiting Artists

Mauricio Arango:

Flash art is one of my favorite kinds of art. I think the stuff he did was
really cool. I admired him and his art work. I would like to learn more.

Jamason Chen:

He talked about "What is art?" and that was really interesting. He
discussed electronic media. It's really cool how we are able to take photos
with things like cell phones that we carry around all the time. The
pictures that he took with his cell phone are very nice. "Content is more
important than technology."

Utopia In Progress Response

Utopia in Progress by Jenny Schmid is a very fun and playful animation film. It starts with a girl floating in on a ship that takes off into the sky. It then cuts to a boy wandering around with a mystical butterfly following close behind him. Out of nowhere, a UFO swoops down and picks him up. The girl then reappears, floating down from the sky with a parachute and lands on a skateboard. She then rides away and passes the boy, knocking books out of his hands. One of the books opens to a man dressed in a bear costume and that is dancing. The girl rides in on a comet and starts rocking out on the drums. Purple bubbles come out of the drum set to fill the screen to end the film. This film does not seem to make a whole lot of sense but is captivating and keeps your attention through the entire thing. It makes the view sit with anticipation, wondering what is going to happen next. The characters in the film are very stereotypical to all of her works. She also creates a great sense of motion even with just cut-out figures.

Liberty and Freedom

This video examines the relationship between feminism, freedom and the American lifestyle. More specifically it questions the motives behind feminism: is it seeking equal rights for women? or for authority over men? To me, it is the latter. After research and reflection, I think that women having more authority than men has the opposite effect than it aims for; rather than having more freedom, women are mentally, emotionally and spiritually more oppressed. Although the American society often objectifies women, this work suggests the disconnect between improving the situation and this type of feminist movement.
(This is a continuation of my Appropriated Film Project. Audio has been added.)









Walker Response

An art work that I found very interesting was a piece created by Tara Donovan, called Untitled. It was created by etching on paper. It was an artwork about bubbles that caught my eye. Not only the way that it looks that caught my eyes but the process of the creation even shocked me.

When I looked up research about Tara Donovan, I read that she was known for her abstract landscape that was all created by very common things that are found anywhere such as plastic. As I said before the artwork that I saw at the Walker Art Center was amazing to me. And how the piece was created was so shocking. I did not believe that the artwork was created that way. She blew air into a mixture through straw creating different sizes of bubbles. And it somehow melted into the surface. The bubble dissolved and created etched lines. I never knew that was a way to also create art. It was a technique that I never heard or knew about.
The work was amazing giving the size. I popped out with great shaded lines. It was in black and white so the color hues were basically black. But because of the bubbles and the over lapping of those bubble it created different types of shade making it more interesting to look at. Also if you get closer you will see where there were air bubbles that have no shade but because they were there it helps contrast the other work to keep the eyes moving. It also made the work appear 3-D, as if the bubbles were still on the paper.

Walker Response

Studio E Visit

Colin McFadden showed us around Studio E and showed us what it has to offer. I learned a lot about the thing that are capable of doing in Studio E. It is a great place for filming anything: from green screen work to just plain black backdrops. With there sound proofed walls, it is also a great place to record audio. The studio has some of the top equipment in the area, even better than some of the news stations around the twin cities. Colin did not show us at the time how to use any of the equipment because there is too much to show but he did share with us all the possibilities. We have control of everything: lights, audio, cameras, and recording. If you don’t want to do any post editing you can even shot and record everything in real time. Studio E is a great resource to have and could come in very hand with many projects.

Chambers response

The artwork that I found interesting at Chambers was an artwork that was called a spin art. A man named Damien Hirst created it.

It was very interesting to look at because it was very different from the others. Also I found it strange that the artwork was called spin art. I have never heard of it before nor even seen anything called that. When I saw it seem very plain. Like it was nothing that I expected I thought it was some kind of different media. But I found out that it was just a painting that was in a circle canvas and there was paint that was on it. Yet I found it to be more interesting then that the other arts that was in the hotel. The use of colors was great it was a lot of warm colors mix in with a few cool colors. It worked really well with each other keeping my eyes moving around. My eyes could not stand still. Maybe that could be the affect of it being a spin art. Also it wasn’t just straight lines. There was movement everywhere. Maybe it was because all of the painting lines were going around the art. It was like it was following the spin of the spin art. I enjoy how some of the art at Chambers that was so different from the other arts that I have seen. I would believe the hotel was more of a art museum more than a hotel.

Walker Response

Visiting Artists

Jamason had us think about technology and why we use it. He talked a great deal about photography and cameras. Why do we prefer to us digital cameras over cameras with film? He said it was all about accessibility. You can share your work and your life experiences with the world much easier from a digital camera. You can take a picture and immediately put it up on the Internet. Digital cameras are now getting to the point where they can take pictures almost better than film cameras. And the fact that they are so small you can carry them around in your pocket makes them that much more practical. In the end, you need to decide whether you want to trade convenience for quality.

Mauricio showed us all the different things you can use Flash for. He explained that it is not just for animations. He has created an idea for a web page through Flash. You can create buttons and other commands that make Flash interactive with its viewers. He told us that it is also extremely helpful to learn how to write code. This is not something that anyone can really teach to you but if you want to learn how to, there are books to help you. That’s how he was able to create the things that he did. Flash is a huge program that can be used in many different ways and not just for animation.

Walker Response

Freshworks Response

I was really impressed with all of the art in the Fresh Works exhibit. I honestly wasn’t expecting to a lot of art that interested me, but I was wrong.

. I also didn’t realize that the art I had been walking past for the last month was a part of that exhibit, so I decided to take a closer look at what I had been overlooking.
The art by David Donovan in the East building is truly fascinating. He has several boxed installations on the wall. They all have different objects in them and a different story to tell, but there’s also a common thread of color and tone that ties them all together. Each box has its own title, but they were all made in either 2006 or 2007 with mixed media.
The box titled With Teeth is very cool. It’s one of the larger boxes, and has a large metal rod that has teeth-like appendages sitting vertically in the box. Next to the piece of machinery is a small x-ray of teeth. And in front of the both of theses is a tangled mess of copper wire that spans the entire box from left to right. This box seems kind of menacing, and it made me very conscious of the teeth in my mouth.
My favorite box is the one titled Faceless. It’s another of the larger boxes and has a large bust and face made out of wax. The wax has obviously been melted which causes the bust to be distorted. Half of the face is missing, and looks like it’s in pain. Behind the bust are three metal plates that look like they belonged to a circuit board. Yet again I’m reminded of pain, and the wax seems to make it frozen in place. I guess these pieces touch the darker side of my personality.

B.A./B.F.A. Exhibit

The pieces of work that caught my eye as soon as I walked into the gallery were some interesting cartoon figures all located in paintings with abstract backgrounds.

These cartoon figures are unlike anything that I was used to seeing. The figures themselves had a very sadistic look, almost like each and every one was a trouble maker, or evil in some kind of way. They look like the japanese cartoon character you might see in your nightmares. The creative artist that created these Acrylic pieces on canvas was Pavel Sepelenko. Some of the many titles for the pieces he created were " Robotshake", "Messer", and "North" (2006). The colors that he used in his pieces also caught my eye because they were brilliant but not overpowering, and he used a wide scale of colors, hues, and did a good job at contrasting them so they stand out to the eye, but aren't too much for the viewer. He also did a good job on taking his paintings and bringing them to life (in a sense) by creating a couple figures much like the ones in his paintings, two of them made of brass, wood, and steel, "Four Ducks of Apocalypse" & "Pollution". These looked as if they walked right out of one of his paintings, which really impressed me that he was able to create these characters on and off of the canvas equally as well.

Jenny Schmid

Utopia In Progress

The Animation 'Utopia In Progress' by Jenny Schmid took me a few times of viewing to figure out, and I am not sure i completely understand it yet. One thing I do know is that I liked it. Here is what I think this animation is about.

In the beginning we start with a scene over a river where woman is flying in a balloon and a man is coming up from the water. The scene is in color but the humans are in black and white. I think after watching a few times the idea is an evolutionary one.
We follow the man while he is reading and there is a bird type thing following him, the bird helps him with light so he can read in the dark. Then the man seems to be in space and a space machine picks him up and the machine either turns him into a girl or keeps the man and releases the girl from the beginning of the film.
The girl floats down to earth. And she is a cool girl. She lands on a skate board. Cool! She comes across a guy and scuffles his paper leaving him in the dust which leaves him looking kind of dumb. Then the girl starts playing the drums. Cool! Thats the end.
I think this is about evolution because it appeared that either the girl made the boy, or the boy turned into a girl. And the girl was much superior to the boy, She was much cooler!

Documenting China Response

The piece by Zhou Ming taken in 2002 was very interesting. The photo is composed of bunch small birdcages hanging outside. This is an odd composition because of the placement of cages. Every small sized birdcage I have ever seen has been inside the home, not hung outside of one. The birds in the cages also seem to be common everyday birds you see flying round and not in cages. They might bird beautiful colored birds that are meant to stay in cages but we cannot tell because the photo is in black and white. Also, if these birds were very colorful, then the question yet again arises, why are then outside? In the background, we can see a person biking who appears to also be looking at the birdcages. Perhaps he is wondering the same thing we are. Also, the city in the back does not seem to be the nicest area in town. These cages might seem a little less peculiar if they were hanging from the penthouse loft in a ritzy downtown area. This photo really makes you wonder so many things about it.

"Enchanted" Exhibit

One of the pieces that stands out in this whole exhibit is the bright and extremely colorful "C-36" (2007) by Erik Ullanderson.

Made of glitter, flaste, enamel, hologram stickers, and metal foil, this piece is large with vibrant colors and fantastic shapes, and the items such as metal foil and hologram stickers allow this piece to use the surrounding light in genius ways. Automatically when you look at the piece, it brings you to a place of rainbows, unicorns, and acid trips from back in the late 60's. The technique he used to create the layout of his work of art reminds me of posters, ads, and art I've seen created in the 60's and 70's, with retro shapes and colors schemes. This piece also reminds me of something that a young girl might put together. It brings me back to coloring books with stickers and markers. The materials that Erik used were materials I used back in elementary school during arts and crafts, except for the photos he incorporated into the piece. He used pictures as a background to work on as he built up the surroundings with bands of color and different shapes. He took probably about 7 different pictures, built up the color in different layers, and then took the final pieces and put them together to resemble one large piece of artwork. Overall it was a fun piece that brought a smile to my face. :-)

"Enchanted" Exhibit

One of the pieces that stands out in this whole exhibit is the bright and extremely colorful "C-36" (2007) by Erik Ullanderson.

Made of glitter, flaste, enamel, hologram stickers, and metal foil, this piece is large with vibrant colors and fantastic shapes, and the items such as metal foil and hologram stickers allow this piece to use the surrounding light in genius ways. Automatically when you look at the piece, it brings you to a place of rainbows, unicorns, and acid trips from back in the late 60's. The technique he used to create the layout of his work of art reminds me of posters, ads, and art I've seen created in the 60's and 70's, with retro shapes and colors schemes. This piece also reminds me of something that a young girl might put together. It brings me back to coloring books with stickers and markers. The materials that Erik used were materials I used back in elementary school during arts and crafts, except for the photos he incorporated into the piece. He used pictures as a background to work on as he built up the surroundings with bands of color and different shapes. He took probably about 7 different pictures, built up the color in different layers, and then took the final pieces and put them together to resemble one large piece of artwork. Overall it was a fun piece that brought a smile to my face. :-)

Appropriated Video









Appropriated Film

Media Mill Video









Appropriated Video








Peace of War

In this audio work, I wanted to juxtapose different ideas and thoughts of war and peace in current global settings. Ideas such as innocence, rage, fear, hatred, joy, death, and ignorance are discussed within this work. What roles do these topics play in our global society and more so within our individual lives and minds. What causes one to be full of joy and another to never know such a thing? What causes one to experience much suffering and another to experience it very little? Does an individual choose? If not, how do these differences come about? Do internal struggles affect these ideas? Are they or can they be controlled? How do these thoughts play into a bigger picture of modern war and peace?








Placement Gallery Response

Starting from the advertisement of this gallery and all the way until I got to the actual site of all of this interesting art, there was one group of paintings that stayed on my mind. John Fleischer had approximately 12 pictures, all with the same media, looking as if from the same idea, each one slightly different.

With titles such as “He make a Model?, “He regret he do?, and “He long time friend?, the titles of the works he created are just as weird as the images he pairs them up with. With several layers of bright, vibrant colors and many somewhat abstract shapes, all of these add up for a formula that creates an odd looking face, all with different faces, getting more and more weird as you move down the line.
When you look close at the paintings, they almost look ghostly because of the lack of really harsh and sharp lines, and with the images that have a larger variety of color seem to take on that ghostly characteristic more. If there were lines used to emphasize a shape or a figure, they were painterly. Taking another look at this group of paintings, it reminds me of paintings that a child might create. It brings me back to kindergarten when the class all had to draw pictures of themselves, and looking back on those pictures today (many years later) you can see the similarities in the paintings by John Fleischer and that of a 5 year old. Both paintings use basic shapes to define figures as well as color. Because of the lack of knowledge and practice, children tend to draw in a more abstract way (i.e. coloring outside of the lines, creating shapes that may not be symmetrical nor perfect, using shapes to represent things—a triangle for a skirt, a curly-q for hair, a circle for the sun…etc.), and these paintings that John Fleischer created remind me of such paintings done by someone in grade school.
The titles of these pieces also show once again a similarity between these paintings and something created by someone very young. The use of improper English in the titles, and how the phrases read, it sounds and reads as if the person that wrote the titles had a 2nd grade reading level. I am sure these given similarities may have been intentional by the artist, but the artist leaves enough unknown to make the viewer read each painting how they want to. I think that this display of pictures created by John Fleischer were some of not only the most intriguing pieces of works at the Placement Gallery exhibit “Obsessive Compulsive Drawing?, but also some of the most memorable.

BA/BFA Exhibit

Pa Houa Lee's piece called "Murder in a Womb" originally struck me as twisted and graphic. Once I read into the piece more though, I found it to be a lot more interesting. The piece was made in 2007 and it looks like an x-ray viewer that illuminates six pictures of two babies in a womb. Each picture together creates a progression of one of the babies strangling the other one with its umbilical cord. I read the writing from Pa Houa, and it made me think a lot more. She described it as someone committing their first crime before they were even born. It got me to thinking about the corruption of humanity, and how so many people, who may come across as innocent, have different objections than expected. Another thing I thought about while looking at this piece was the struggle between people, and the need for people to be better than others. It's a sad truth, not for everyone, but for a lot of people that they need to be in the spotlight. Although these babies in the womb probably can't actually understand that they are both going to be one mother's children, it is symbolic, in a way, of the need to be the one with all the attention. Overall, even though these images are disturbing to look at, there is a lot of meaning behind them that most people can relate to.

Sound project test

Download file


This is my sound project. It is about a strom and calms down into a ocean. It has bird sounds in it and a little bit of chimes. Hopefully it brings out a calm to the mind because that was what I was going for.

One Morning








Download Mp3 from this link if flash player will only play the first half: https://mediamill.cla.umn.edu/mediamill/download.php?file=6429.mp3

Patrick Holbrook Response

In his appropriated work, Patrick uses a lot of his own material. It's also apparent that he's a very political artist, and everything he creates carries an important message.

One piece that struck me was the one titled Fields. Patrick took the locations and amount of air strikes in Lebanon in 2006, and mapped it out on the floor using pens. On the wall is a looped video of the installation. It represents the idea that if people can't break out of the loop we will be stuck in an everlasting state of war. There was also an outdoor component that was the map of a minefield drawn on the grass. The location, however is not known. The artist wants to know how meaning can be created if the context of the information is taken away. I feel like the artist gets his point across very well. I totally agree; what does the information mean if it's given no contextual information?

Studio E

Studio E was a very cool workspace. I especially enjoyed the three nice cameras with good stands, and in a studio with good lighting. It seems like it would make the large jump from a crappy homev-video production to a professional feel. It is really amazing that all of this is available t o U of M students, I guess I can start to see where all the money we spend goes. I was also very impressed with the idea that you could walk out of the studio with a finished project, doing all of the editing, sound effects, and possiblly green screen effects, live.

Studio E

The trip to Studio E was very, very interesting to me. We had a TV Production studio in my high school, and I took a class where we worked with it. Studio E is 100x better than the one from high school. I have some experience working with TV production, so it was really cool to see a more advanced studio. I was also amazed at all the technology we are able to checkout for free. That is a really great opportunity for us, so I am excited to take advantage of it.

Placement Gallery Response

Starting from the advertisement of this gallery and all the way until I got to the actual site of all of this interesting art, there was one group of paintings that stayed on my mind. John Fleischer had approximately 12 pictures, all with the same media, looking as if from the same idea, each one slightly different.

With titles such as “He make a Model?, “He regret he do?, and “He long time friend?, the titles of the works he created are just as weird as the images he pairs them up with. With several layers of bright, vibrant colors and many somewhat abstract shapes, all of these add up for a formula that creates an odd looking face, all with different faces, getting more and more weird as you move down the line.
When you look close at the paintings, they almost look ghostly because of the lack of really harsh and sharp lines, and with the images that have a larger variety of color seem to take on that ghostly characteristic more. If there were lines used to emphasize a shape or a figure, they were painterly. Taking another look at this group of paintings, it reminds me of paintings that a child might create. It brings me back to kindergarten when the class all had to draw pictures of themselves, and looking back on those pictures today (many years later) you can see the similarities in the paintings by John Fleischer and that of a 5 year old. Both paintings use basic shapes to define figures as well as color. Because of the lack of knowledge and practice, children tend to draw in a more abstract way (i.e. coloring outside of the lines, creating shapes that may not be symmetrical nor perfect, using shapes to represent things—a triangle for a skirt, a curly-q for hair, a circle for the sun…etc.), and these paintings that John Fleischer created remind me of such paintings done by someone in grade school.
The titles of these pieces also show once again a similarity between these paintings and something created by someone very young. The use of improper English in the titles, and how the phrases read, it sounds and reads as if the person that wrote the titles had a 2nd grade reading level. I am sure these given similarities may have been intentional by the artist, but the artist leaves enough unknown to make the viewer read each painting how they want to. I think that this display of pictures created by John Fleischer were some of not only the most intriguing pieces of works at the Placement Gallery exhibit “Obsessive Compulsive Drawing?, but also some of the most memorable.

Found Footage Compilation








Found

Final Project

Drugs Are Like That

Media Mill Video









Freshworks Response

Since the beginning of the exhibit “Fresh Works?, I was drawn to some of the art simply because it was created by fellow students. It is always interesting to me to see what some of the senior art students can come up with for either projects for their classes or their final senior project.

A pair of pieces done by Josie Lewis called “Birds #1 &2? caught my eye immediately. These are larger scale pictures, roughly 3ft. by 3ft., and when you first glance at them, you think that you might be looking at a painting, or even a drawing. The thick plastic-like coating over the top layer of the pictures give it a look at if it is under a layer of water, like the image is floating under a shiny layer of protection.
Finally deciding to get very close to the pictures to try to figure out just what created these images, to my amazement little scraps of paper were put together in a fluid motion to create what looks like brush strokes. These little squares of paper all had different images on them, and in return usually held a certain color scheme, and when taking that image, cutting it up into squares (just large enough to see part of the image still), and when pasted next to each other in sequence, it looks as if that section of squares was a large brush stroke of paint, with tons of interesting detail all located inside of the pigment of the paint.
Josie Lewis also had another similar painting that matched the other pair labeled “Bridge?. This also used the technique of cut paper to create a separate image out of other images. All three paintings used resin to create the gel-like covering over each work of art, and at times were also used to layer paper on top of paper to give the work a three-dimensional feel and look. I just think to myself how hard it would be to paste down each and every scrap of paper, and the difficulty level to do it in such a way to make the image flow as gracefully as she does, it becomes inspiring looking at her artwork.

Flipbook Project

This flipbook is my first ever and focuses on the concept of metamorphis in a space (specifically a landscape) due to human or natural processes over the course of time.
Coming soon-more frames and hopefully sound!










Philip James Hart

childsmall.jpg

Born in the medium-sized town of Mankato, Minnesota, I was different from the other toddlers. Luckily, some might say, I stayed different. I've always striven for some sense of normalcy, but I've never gotten it quite right. Alas, I am young, and I know not what I want. I fancy myself the creative, intellectual type, but I am forever battling my own lethargy, and thus far laziness has won.

Consequently, my library of artwork is limited, almost nonexistent. I sometimes feel I lack the initiative and the patience to create anything worthwhile, and so disillusion is a constant companion of mine.

The "art" I do manage to produce is usually of, in my opinion at least, of low quality. A quick sketch, a hastily edited video, only a partial song. Most of my time is spent sleeping or doing nothing. I try to maintain a semi-regular journal which represents the extent of my commitment to my passions. I hope to take my interest and intuition for film and music and to incorporate them into something original and beautiful. My ultimate goal is to create my own elaborate, visually stunning stage pieces. But of course that will take years of planning and many millions of dollars which I do not have.

Currently I play guitar and keyboards casually, although I am not in a real band of any kind and I rarely record what I write. I'd like it if I could write, direct, edit, and perform the soundtracks for movies, since I am interested in all levels of film production. I know that seems like a lot of work and responsibility, but I'd like to think I could handle it all in the name of art.

Studio E

Visiting Studio E was incredible. I can’t believe I have an entire production studio at my disposal. It was great to see the chroma keying equipment and the introduction to lighting for the chroma key will be useful. I am also happy to know I can check out video equipment of professional quality.

Chambers Response

One of the most ironic works in the place would have to be the “statue? by Damien Hurst named “Judas Escariot?. Although most label this as a sculpture, it is most out of the ordinary when compared to others think a piece of sculpture is.

Returning to Chambers was an exciting time for me. I have visited Chamber’s Hotel and Restaurant on my own, usually at nighttime, and have enjoyed revisiting the nightlife time and time again. There is a very modern feel to the hotel, and to complement it are contemporary pieces of art, located down every corridor, every hallway, and every room of Chambers. Returning during the daytime gave Chambers a different feel to me, at night it feels more like a nightclub in a way, and in the daytime it has more of a museum feel. Being able to finally go through the hotel and having the chance to take an up close and personal look at each and every piece in the hotel gave me an even greater respect for the work and thought put into this hotel (the hotel and restaurant are pieces of artwork themselves!).
Usually when people think about a piece of sculpture, you think of something carved out of marble, or some kind of stone; this piece of sculpture is made out of flesh and blood. Okay, maybe not blood, but what sits soaking in a tank of formaldehyde is the fleshy remains of a cattle head. The funny thing is that this grotesque piece of artwork is located right behind the main checkout area for guests in this hotel. The interesting part is that as guests check in, most do not recognize what lies behind the counter, and they often dismiss it as a fake head if they do take notice.
I think that this piece is one of the most interesting because of the fact that it is a real head of a cow, but because of its placement, lighting, and other factors much like these, most do not recognize it, and if they do, they do not pay much attention to it. You would think that something this real, and to some, this disgusting, would attract much more attention than it gets, but this just shows the power of a curator and how much the curator can effect the viewing of a piece of artwork.

Paper Trails Response

When I first walked into the “Paper Trails? exhibit, not too many of the
works really moved me. Some of the pieces seemed to be as shallow as the
paper cutouts used to create them and in return, I did not stay long at the
pieces to try to figure them out.

I came to a smaller corridor where finally
I met with images that made me stay and gawk for a while, one of these being
“Vanilla Nightmares #3,9, &10" by Adrian Piper, created back in 1986. Walking
up to these pieces of old, tarnished news papers reminded me of going through
old newspapers and catalogues you find stored in your attic, almost like
going back into time. Walking closer to the sheets of old newspaper tacked to
the wall, these images started to pop out of the pages. At first it seems
like these images were not deliberately and some what chaotically printed on
these pages of newspaper, almost like the printing company made a mistake,
but a closer look comes to reveal that these images are actually drawn onto
these pages.
Being a passionate drawer myself, I was a little amazed by the realistic
look of these images sketched over articles, and I admired that Adrian Piper
dared to draw over printed articles and was moved by her ability to
incorporate these images into the paper as if maybe they belonged next to the
articles they were illustrated by. Taking a closer look at the images, I
noticed not only were these images of African-American people, but they were
drawn in such a manner that reminded me of images of oppressed slaves or
similar issues such as the disturbing images shown over the television back
when the civil rights movement was going on. I also began to see the
connection between the articles and the images as well. Each image of an
oppressed African-American was shown next to an article with a topic having
something to do with a professional and powerful Caucasian-American, often
involving politics. Putting both the articles and the images together, it
came to my attention that this was a political piece. These powerful images
of discrimination drawn in graphite and charcoal on newspaper were addressing
racial issues, affirmative action, alienation, and current affairs,
especially the ones that were taking place a few decades ago.
This project that she started by taking all of these newspaper articles and
creating some kind of opposing image to represent the discrimination of
African-American people really moved me to look at the deeper meaning of some
of the things we read in the newspaper today. I think that she made a smart
move by creating these semi-controversial images/pieces and attacking some of
society in such a way to get her point across in a strong way, but also in a
non-insulting way for the rest of society (i.e. insulting dirty-white
politicians but not insulting the rest of white America).

Appropriated Film Project and Process Response

This video examines the relationship between feminism, freedom and the American lifestyle. More specifically it questions the motives behind feminism: is it seeking equal rights for women? or for authority over men? To me, it is the latter. After research and reflection, I think that women having more authority than men has the opposite effect than it aims for; rather than having more freedom, women are mentally, emotionally and spiritually more oppressed. Although the American society often objectifies women, this work suggests the disconnect between improving the situation and this type of feminist movement.










Video Project

This video examines the relationship between feminism, freedom and the American lifestyle. More specifically it questions the motives behind feminism: is it seeking equal rights for women? or for authority over men? To me, it is the latter. After research and reflection, I think that women having more authority than men has the opposite effect than it aims for; rather than having more freedom, women are mentally, emotionally and spiritually more oppressed. Although the American society often objectifies women, this work suggests the disconnect between improving the situation and this type of feminist movement.









Download file

Final Final

Past, President and Future Personalized








Animation









This is the current animation that I have made. It has no real skill and was done in a rush. At the beginning of the animaition there are a few clips that are not evenly put in, but this was an assignment that was completed. Please enjoy an animation that has no sound, done in pencil and has a bit of color splash into it.

Studio E

Studio E visit

- It was a great experience to go see what was available to us at Studio
E inside Rarig Center. I was amazed at what students are given to work
with at their disposal. I learned quite a bit, including the importance of
light. They have a good set-up in Studio E for setting up lights that can
help students get a professional look to their projects if they choose to
do so.

Fresh Work Respone

Walking around the art building and looking at the art work I notice one painting that caught my eyes the most.

The painting was painted by Araan Schmidt with ink on paper. Schmidt didn’t title the art work so it’s untitled. The reason why this painting caught my eyes was how it was painted. It was a black and white painting which looked like a pile of dead body stacking on top of each other with a huge blood stain on the bottom. The darker areas that Schmidt made on the painting tend to look like blood. I like this painting because it was a simple drawing but means so many different things by the thickness of the color.

The Placement Gallery Response

Nick Howard's set of work, composed of several pages of a book (and titled only according to the number of the page) is undoubtedly worthy of note by itself. Like most of the other placement gallery images, this set was considerably disturbing. The images compose a sort of narrative, much like the pages of a graphic novel, with recurring themes and characters. The figures are a unique and frightening form though, featuring a freakish set of multiple jaws with long, sharp teeth.

These multiple sets of jaws, in fact, compose the most important of the unifying elements in Howard's work, giving every image in the set at least one visual theme that is represented in exactly the same way in each "page" except for pages 58 and 59, where the sharp jaws of the figures are closed. It was particularly interesting to me that this same point, the only one where those unifying jaws are changed, is also the point that could be considered the 'climax' of the story we were witnessing, immediately afterwards, one of the characters appears to die, being cradled in the arms of another on page 60. Other changes to the formulaic representation of the characters, such as the hair featured on one on page 57, seems to reinforce this idea that a change in aesthetic seems to preface chaos. The question I then naturally posed to myself was, "what does this mean then? " The negativity or positivity of change was likely not the main message of Howards art; I instead got from it a message of points in a life; birth, love, and death, though there are NUMEROUS other themes in the piece and I have had a difficult time trying to interpret it. The images toward the beginning of the set are largely composed of figures pulling apart from each other like a cell splitting in two, perhaps signifying eartly life, birth, and splitting from ones parents. However, later images also feature splitting figures (such as pages 49 and 53); so perhaps it is representative of a sort of sexual unification? Images toward the middle and end of the piece are peppered with military medals and suits, again, perhaps signifying a life in early middle-age. The images go on to portray the death of one figure, and end with the "Inescapable" series, 1-4. This is undoutedly a set of images addressing death, each figure looking like a mourner in black attire. This also composed my favorite portion of Howard's work; the cross-hatching and dark figures were very stylish

Fresh Works

How many times do you have to say sorry? When people hurt someone is sorry enough? Is saying sorry 36 times enough? Is there a correlation to the number of times you say sorry in proportion to the severity of original wrongdoing?

I’m so sorry is that sentence written out in porcelain 9 times on a panel and presented as 4 panels. 36 apologies. What did the artist do to needed 36 apologies? If the situation was reversed and the artist was the one who was wronged would she accept 36 apologies, or would it only take one.

Forgiveness is one of the most difficult actions, but it is the most human. Forgiveness is human because it recognizes that we all make mistakes whether intentional or not. We all hurt people and we all do thing we regret. The only solution to reconcile those feelings is the sentence I’m sorry.

The Chambers Hotel

Designer David Rockwell took the white walls of an art museum and softened despite staying the same color.

Instead of choosing a single work of art to respond to I’m going to respond to the design of the hotel. It would be one thing to stay in a hotel that has great art. It would be quite another thing to take a sleeping bag and sleep in an art museum. Designer David Rockwell took the later and replaced the sleeping bag with well appointed rooms, a hip lounge, and a dramatic penthouse bar. Through the use of layered forms, textures he skillfully took out the cold museum quality but kept the artistic energy.

The exterior acknowledges the building’s re-use through the rust colored cor-ten steel panels applied over the early twentieth-century masonry on the street level. The basket weave entry doors give way to large glass pane doors relieving the individual from the city congestion. The suite we entered opened to a sitting room with built-in bar and a translucent wall that concealed, or didn’t conceal, the shower. The egg shaped bath tub, and crisp white furniture was anchored to an ebony stained hardwood floor.

The idea behind the design was to let the art energize spaces but to accomplish that the spaces had to be receptive to any art. Careful design is truly the cornerstone to THE Luxury Art Hotel.

animation









Flip Book Animation

The flipbook project for me was an opportunity to start visualizing motion in a new way. I wanted to focus on a single a motion – the motion of a pencil and the mark it leaves.

The flipbook project for me was an opportunity to start visualizing motion in a new way. I wanted to focus on a single a motion – the motion of a pencil and the mark it leaves. I wanted it to be as precise as possible so I built and used a light table. Despite my best efforts for precision after scanning, assembling, and playing back the images I found the texture of the shakes and imprecision an improvement and not a fault. The story line of the flip book starts innocently, a moving pencil, but after it leaves the frame the pencil’s stroke divides and suggests an opening into another world of animation. I hope that this can, in some insignificant way, signal the beginning of my exploration into the animation realm.

Chamber Hotel Respond

The artwork that I like on our visit to the Chamber Hotel was the sculpture that Evan Peeny made from silicone, pigment, fabric, hair, and aluminum.

Peeny made this sculpture in 2005. This sculpture was no one in particular it was just made up. The reason why I like this sculpture was the first time I saw it I was amazed how real it look like. It looked like a real person with the texture, the color, and everything else it had. I’m still amazed until now how he mad it look so real.

Concept Art Response

Of all the resources we received for this class, the one I use more often than any other is Conceptart.org, one of the websites provided to us for use with photoshop. I find myself continually returning to it and viewing the work by the multitue of artists there. The best thing about this is that I am provided the opportunity to view work from multiple artists in multiple styles. Though this is just an online resource, it neverthess important to me because it allows me to "model" from other artist's, including professionals', work and give me access to art that I would otherwise not be able to view. There seems to be art from both digital and traditional medium; this is important to me because it allows me to view work and learn from it from both traditional and modern methods. For example, in Conceptart.org, the work of William Whitaker has a very "traditional" feel to it, seeming to be consistant of lots of traditional portraits, while the work of "Android" of Massive Black Inc. is clearly digital artwork, with a higher degree of sharp details. Of all the artists featured in this forum, my favorite yet goes simply by the name "Sammy," and their work is extremely imaginative, featuring a unique blend of mechanical and biological features in paintings; for example in one image populated by vehicles that appear to be a blend of machine and dinosaur or horse. The colors of "Sammy's" work as just as intoxicating, as they often blend dark foregrounds with light backgrounds, and create a very unique shadowy feel, as though they are capturing a moment near dusk.

SAD Response

I choose the piece by Andrea Stanislav titled Flashland. This was a film with audio. It was set up in a small dark room with a TV in front of you and two side TVs not to be viewed directly but rather through your peripheral vision. There were small speakers around the room providing you with a good sound quality.

What first drew me towards this work was the eeriness of it. The sounds that were coming from the room were odd and but yet soothing. I did not read the information plate on the wall outside the room but understood that I was supposed to look straight head. When I first sat down, the image was of a woman flipping her hair around. Behind her was a circle that looked like it was used for mathematical purposes. The audio was a smooth ambient sound that made me fall into a trance. This made is very easy to stay with anticipation of what was to come next.

In addiction to the woman flipping her hair around, there were made different and unique clips. There was also in owl that sat very still, staring at you. There was water and at some points with a small building in it. After viewing this for a short while it would flip upside down. There was a woman, possibly the same one as before, with white contact in. This was the one clip that kind of freaked me out. Each of these clips was paired with audio that seemed appropriate to the images.

While I was watching this film, it started reminding me of the video from The Ring. Much like the video in this movie, Stanislav’s film was made up of a string of short clips to make of a whole piece. The film began to flop so I got up to look around some more but then it made me wonder; where did I start watching the film? I could have by accident sat down to watch at the beginning or perhaps I sat down half way through. It kind of bother me not know when I started watching. I also thought what it would have been like if I just watched it from start to finish once through.

The Diane Willow's class critique really gave me a more complete understanding of what interactive art really is. The goal of these pieces was obviously to harbor an interaction between the viewer and the artwork, making the art rely, at least to some extent, on the actions of the viewer. The piece that stood out most to me was "I'm on Fire," created by a student who created a video feed that automatically made a series of spark-like red dots rise upward around movement, making the subject appear to be on fire. This struck me as a very clever idea; though it does not have any specific cultural implications or deep subjects, its still visually striking and engages the viewer to an extent beyond any time/interactive-based artwork i have yet seen. I believe that the other piece that really demands note was the piece featured at the door (I unfortunately did not record the title) in which every person entering the door would trigger a reaction in the computer screen nearby, which would continually project one new part of the full image on to the wall. The most charming part of this piece was a sort of underlying idealism behind it; the idea that every person coming by would contribute to the final piece is a particularly inspiring sentiment.

The Placement Gallery

When I think of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) I think of everything in its place, continuous hand washing, and a fear of leaving the house. I think of Bill Murray in the film What About Bob?

And an obsessive-compulsive drawing? It should be photo realistic or a perspective so perfect you would think the world around you is only 2D. So when I saw the mixed media drawings of John Fleischer at the Placement Gallery I didn’t know what to think. The grotesque faces in black and white are in-filled with color, many times representing another face or a characteristic of the individuals. The one titled “he love rock? has the remnants of Gene Simmons’ makeup.

After some thought I realized that drawings infect the viewer with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Our eyes want things on paper to match up. It is disturbing when eyes are different sizes or ears are disproportionate, or text is upside down. It is disturbing when that text is poor grammar or when stubble is floating over the shoulder instead of anchored on the cheek. The drawings highlight that each of us is obsessive compulsive even if our case is mild at best.

SAD Response

Seasonal Affective Disorder is an illness that affects the sufferers mainly in the summer and winter seasons. According to the American Journal of Psychiatry, S.A.D. is believed to be related to light because of the effectiveness of bright light therapy. The ‘SAD’ exhibit on display at the Weisman Art Museum is filled with works of art that were inspired by the depression that comes with the winter and summer months in the northern state of Minnesota.

The artwork that I chose to discuss is a painting called, “I’ll Call You,? by Ana-Lois Borzi. She worked on it from 2005 to 2007 and used charcoal and pastels on latex paint. There were a few different reasons that I chose “I’ll Call You.? One reason is because although it was made with such simplicity, there is something about it that pulls you in. Once you start looking at it, you learn another reason that I chose it: I found the work to be extremely thought provoking. In a way, I felt like the painting was a puzzle because there seems to be so much meaning behind the little red squares, the cloud, and the text that says ‘I’ll Call You.’ I cannot pick just one message from the painting because so many meanings come to mind. The last main reason I chose this piece is because of the description it has. It says, “This wall mural speaks to the tragedy of everyday promises not kept.? That is what got my mind racing with ideas of its meaning. Plus, broken promises are something I can so easily relate to. So the mural depicts a gray cloud, possibly with a knife of sorts piercing it, with the words ‘I’ll Call You’ falling from the cloud to a surface of little red squares that fade from solid red to light red. I have a few different interpretations of the painting. It seems like the more I think about it, the more ideas pop into my mind, and that is one of the most amazing things about this piece. The one thing I feel pretty sure about in this mural is the cloud. I think the cloud symbolizes the artist. When clouds build up too much moisture, they get too heavy so they rain the water. I think the cloud represents the artist feeling the pressure of all her promises building up. Eventually she can’t hold onto all of the promises she has kept inside, and she kind of bursts, releasing, or breaking one of her promises. In this case it is the promise she made someone that she would call him or her. Another idea I have is that the red squares are the people in her life, and the ‘I’ll Call You’ is a broken promise raining down and kind of washing people out of her life. My last big idea is that the red squares are all the promises she is trying to keep, but the faded ones are broken, and more promises keep coming.
Overall, this mural ties right in with SAD because she incorporates the depression of clouds and rain with the difficulties of trying to keep promises, but breaking them anyway. There is always some sort of pressure she has to deal with, and this painting expresses it in a sad way about how difficult it is to keep all of her promises.

SAD Response

The piece of work that I chose to write about and observe was created by Charles Matson Lume in 2007. It is called "The Still Time" and is an installation. It is the first piece of work that I saw in the exhibit and it covers three walls. I choose this work for a multitude of reasons but first I wanted to explain my first observations while looking at the work and describe how it looked to me.


On the left wall positioned on the floor connecting to the ground is one of the arcs that represent a winter solstice. There are many mirrors placed on the ground in a very slim arc close to the wall that reflect light onto the wall. This produces a scatter of circles and ovals on the wall of many shapes and sizes. The arc on the wall is not very sharp but is quite elongated. Fiber optics are also used to outline the shape of the arc. All these together produce a very bright and magical looking piece of work.

On the right wall is the largest arc of the three. It is quite different from the others in the fact that it is much higher up and arc is pointed down towards the floor, while the others pointed towards the ceiling. Drink parasols, drinking straws, and drink straws with parasols with a variety of colors - blue, yellow, red, green, and orange - are used to create this work. Some of the parasols are sticking farther out than others. As well, some of the parasol umbrellas are inverted. The straw tips are pointed in a variety of directions. This gives the piece of work a much more multi-dimensional feel and appearance.

Around the corner on the opposite side of the summer arc is the third arc which represents a winter solstice as well. It is created with glow-in-the-dark icicle ornaments and mirrors. The same lighting effect is used with the mirrors on the floor to bounce light onto the wall. This arc is slightly larger than the other winter arc. The icicle ornaments give the representation of the sun its shape and wild surface appearance. It is much more visible than the other winter solstice arc but still gives the same white and magical appearance.

The reason I chose this work is because I feel that it does a good job representing SAD. It was stated that: “SAD addresses a sense of place focused not on land, but on the qualities of light and atmosphere, and the sense of time to which those elements relate.? I think Lume does a great job expressing this through a vision of Minnesota’s landscape of summer and winter. Through the three walls, Lume has the summer squished in between the two winters. From our craving for summer, Lume puts the summer arc high above on top of the middle wall out of reach. He uses vibrant colors to catch our eye and attention and creates an object for our desire. While the winter representations still give us light, its not as colorful and spectacular. I believe he places them on the ground near the floor to represent our easy access to it and the fact that the people of Minnesota are accustomed to our winter. I also believe that the winter arcs are smaller than the summer arc because of the solstice the day is shorter in the winter than in the summer. All of this together provides an impressive piece of work that I believe achieves what it was meant to represent.

Placement Gallery Response

The Placement Gallery had a wide range in style of work. The pieces of art that stood out to me were the works by John Fleischer. These were drawings done with what appeared to be colored oil pastels on large print paper. His drawings are very loose and freely drawn. He uses very bold and rich colors that are not realistic to the content. The content of the drawings shown at the Placement Gallery were of humans faces. These faces showed an extreme amount of expression and emotion. His work comes alive and show movement by him drawing layer upon layer on top of one another. His faces are also done in a slightly abstract way, manipulation the faces in a crude raw type of way. The title of each of the drawings was written on the piece of art at the top but upside down. It also looked like a second grader wrote the words which fit quite well with the style of the face.

The one specific piece that I enjoyed was titled he regret he do. This drawing caught me attention because of the expression on the guys face. The title gives the viewer a glimpse into the man’s head and allows us to start creating a narrative for why the man might looks as he does. Fleischer does a great job depicting the man’s emotions through his facial expressions. The colors also aid in the overall feeling of the art work. There is a decent amount of green in the piece. Green can often be tied to money and greed. There is also a large red area on the right side of the drawing. Red, to some, could be associated with lust and envy. Perhaps the man’s regrets stem from one of these emotions.

Chambers Response

After viewing all the work at Chambers, I decided to choose the mural painting in the stairwell of the building. I have always been interested in graffiti art. When I walked into the stairwell, I immediately recognized one of the artist’s works. I met Josh Lemke this summer through my boss. We talked for some time about his and my art but he did not mention that he had done a piece at Chambers. He told me that he was going to be working on a piece on 1st and 1st in downtown Minneapolis and said that I should come down and check it out when he was working.

His style is very unique. For the most part he tags his own first name instead of using a ‘tag name.’ He also really likes to use about of bold colors and blends them very well. This lettering is also extremely 3D and twice around its self. His work at Chambers is no different. The work here was commissioned to Juxtaposition Art, a nonprofit organization that teaches inner-city youth how to spray paint in an educational and responsible way. The entire piece was done by a team that covers all five floors of the stairwell. It was done with Aerosol spray cans applied directly to the cinderblocks. The job took about two weeks to finish. During the process, they place a fan at the bottom and opened doors and the bottom and top of the stairs creating a wind tunnel to somewhat clear the air. They also wore masks to protect themselves from the fumes.

The whole concept of the piece was the four elements of the earth. The piece starts on the first floor with fire and moving up from there they had earth, wind, and water. They then added the human being at the fifth element on the top floor. This is depicted by a woman with the word Divine behind her. Other images such at earth, they had the tree of life. Also in the tree they placed a fetus which represents how nature is the root of birth. As you walk in to each floor you will see a symbol on the wall which stands for the element on that floor. They then related the five elements of life to elements in hip hop. For this they illustrated a DJ, Break dancing, Graffiti and other icons to the hip hop culture.

Chambers Response

To be perfectly honest, I was not planning on being terribly “wowed? by the Chambers Hotel visit; when first hearing of it, I was planning on seeing just another simple art gallery. While the trips to the other museums were an excellent opportunity to get exposed to lots of art and artists (and unique work, particularly within digital mediums), I had not yet felt a real connection and appreciation for the work I was viewing. However, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the Chambers hotel changed all that.

However, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the Chambers hotel changed all that. I was presented with incredibly striking, highly skilled works of art that were at times downright jaw-dropping, including a photo-realistic sculpture in the café lobby of the hotel (I’m afraid I didn’t record the name of the piece).
However, before going in to detail about the works of art, it is worthwhile to explain the aesthetic qualities of the hotel itself. The chambers hotel has an immensely beautiful interior. This makes sense, considering that the owner of the hotel, has very particular tastes in visual aesthetics. Naturally, a concern for the the interior décor of his hotel is an extension of his affection towards beautiful works of art. Chambers is beautiful from end to end, with a striking café that showcases beautiful works of art, a unique, open fireplace, and a white color scheme that gives the room a clean, comfortable feeling. Indeed, everything about the room makes you feel relaxed and comfy. The same thing extends to the restaurant and the individual rooms (each featuring an original artwork; though I would have to write a whole new essay just to explain the aesthetics of these rooms).
Just as with the café, bedding rooms, and restaurant, several other interior areas of Chambers showcase artistic visual elements that make it such a truly striking place; the most notable of these being the graffiti collage featured on the walls of the staircase. The collage, titled “Juxtaposition,? was completed by seven Minnesotan artists. It the collage features images that are representative of Minnesota, including fish, the unofficial “state bird? (the mosquito), the light rail, and much more. The images all interweave in a complex story, detailing the four basic elements of Earth as well as outlining several other ideas. For example, the foreign words like “Oumar?(Beauty) and “Pubar?(Wisdom) are featured in the work alongside numerous symbolic images, such as Mother Earth (a symbol of beauty) and Dragons (symbolic of wisdom) while water, another central element in Minnesotan culture, connects the entire piece together.
Though the symbolism and intricacies of the piece is interesting, the most important part of “Juxtaposition? is actually its cultural significance. “Juxtaposition? was created by youth taken from the streets of Minneapolis and served as a practical application for them to be seen and to make a difference in another area of American culture. The Chambers hotel served as a tool for these artists to be exposed, and indeed, the work later spawned several commissions for some of them. Part of graffiti’s charm is that it is an art form that people don’t need to go to a gallery to enjoy; they can see it right out in the open. Chambers hotel seems to be the perfect example of this same idea, allowing artwork to be exposed to the right audience; the public.

Flip Book Animation

When creating the original idea for my flip book I received a lot of ideas from
the websites that were given to us. Some of my favorites included flip book
animations where the animation didn't get stuck in the "side-view"
look that we sometimes see quite frequent. I included this point when I had
the ball fly towards the viewer in my own animation. My original idea came from
an image that I had brought into photoshop on the first project where a soccer
player was in mid air hitting a ball. I decided to work off that.

Sean Kapisak

Festival of Appropriation

While my visit to the Soap Factory to view the art work of Festival of Approriation I was confuse on where the building was located becuase the building wasn't what I expected it to be.

The Soap Factory was an abandon warehouse that seem like it was falling apart, so I had second thought about walking inside because it might have been the wrong building but, I took the risk and walked in and was amazed that it was the right building that I was looking for. Walking around and looking at the different art work was very cold because the building doesn't have any heat. But what caught my eye the most from the rest of the different art work was the map of North America that was made from smash up soda and beer cans. The artist that made this art piece is Brant Kingman, it was titled "America the Beautiful." I was amazed from it because I, myself, would have never thought that something that simple can make a wonderful art work. The amazing part is that the artist was even able to separate the different state from one another with the different color can.

Paper Trails Response

When I first walked into the “Paper Trails? exhibit, not too many of the
works really moved me. Some of the pieces seemed to be as shallow as the
paper cutouts used to create them and in return, I did not stay long at the
pieces to try to figure them out.

I came to a smaller corridor where finally
I met with images that made me stay and gawk for a while, one of these being
“Vanilla Nightmares #3,9, &10" by Adrian Piper, created back in 1986. Walking
up to these pieces of old, tarnished news papers reminded me of going through
old newspapers and catalogues you find stored in your attic, almost like
going back into time. Walking closer to the sheets of old newspaper tacked to
the wall, these images started to pop out of the pages. At first it seems
like these images were not deliberately and some what chaotically printed on
these pages of newspaper, almost like the printing company made a mistake,
but a closer look comes to reveal that these images are actually drawn onto
these pages.
Being a passionate drawer myself, I was a little amazed by the realistic
look of these images sketched over articles, and I admired that Adrian Piper
dared to draw over printed articles and was moved by her ability to
incorporate these images into the paper as if maybe they belonged next to the
articles they were illustrated by. Taking a closer look at the images, I
noticed not only were these images of African-American people, but they were
drawn in such a manner that reminded me of images of oppressed slaves or
similar issues such as the disturbing images shown over the television back
when the civil rights movement was going on. I also began to see the
connection between the articles and the images as well. Each image of an
oppressed African-American was shown next to an article with a topic having
something to do with a professional and powerful Caucasian-American, often
involving politics. Putting both the articles and the images together, it
came to my attention that this was a political piece. These powerful images
of discrimination drawn in graphite and charcoal on newspaper were addressing
racial issues, affirmative action, alienation, and current affairs,
especially the ones that were taking place a few decades ago.
This project that she started by taking all of these newspaper articles and
creating some kind of opposing image to represent the discrimination of
African-American people really moved me to look at the deeper meaning of some
of the things we read in the newspaper today. I think that she made a smart
move by creating these semi-controversial images/pieces and attacking some of
society in such a way to get her point across in a strong way, but also in a
non-insulting way for the rest of society (i.e. insulting dirty-white
politicians but not insulting the rest of white America).

Freshworks Response

Even before being given this assignment, I was inspired to check out the steel sculpture by Araan Schmidt that stood, or rather, wrestled in the center of the 1st floor of the Regis Art Building. The sculpture, titled “M.A.D. (Mutually Assured Destruction)? and created in 2007, features two human skeletons cast in stainless steel, appearing to wrestle each other to the ground.

The figures, both about the size of young adolescents, are grasping one another in death-locks, one on its back and trying to hold back the other, and the other looming over and grasping the arms of its opponent. However, there is one very intriguing and unique thing about these figures; they don’t have faces. The skeleton on the bottom is missing most of its mandible and parts of the upper jaw, while the other is completely without a face. Though the simple sight of two skeletons fighting is a bit chilling, the absence of their facial features makes them downright terrifying and disturbing, particularly in that we as the viewers have less to identify them as humans.
The placement of the figures in real space further contributes to the frightfulness of the piece. Rather than viewing them in a two-dimensional painting or photograph, we are actually occupying the same space as the artwork. Although the piece is frozen in time, it still has a particularly strong, animated presence in our real-world space. This is an attribute unique to placement works such as this, but is particularly made strong through the composition of the figures. Everything from the curled toes of the bottom figure, to the slightly bending spine of the attacking figure is reminiscent of real-life, dynamic movement, appearing realistic and frozen in time. Although it is lying still, everything about the composition and pose of the piece conveys movement.
In reflection then, this piece, though not utilizing any digital or time-based meda, is nevertheless an effective piece to observe when considering art based on time and interaction/animation as it shows the effectiveness of simple posing in the effectiveness of expressing movement.

Fresh Works Response

Being a printmaker myself, Josh Winkler’s wood cuts stood out to me. They both have a strong composition. The color choice is also spot on. Josh tries to use all three primary colors in each color he mixes. I was able to watch him print his Walking Softly piece for a demonstration. He used three different blocks, one for each color. On this blocks, he did not cut out all the space he didn't want but instead, just selectively rolled out his block with a small brayer. He first rolled up the pink layer because it was the lightest color and it would be covered the easiest. For registration purposes, he made ink marks at the top of the block knowing that they would be covered by black later. He next put down the gray, doing it the same way that he did the pink. At first he didn't like the gray he mixed so he made it a little darker before he continued rolling it up. And finally, he rolled out the black block. With this block, there were parts that he wanted black but not to show up too much so he made sure that the ink on the brayer was thin so it wouldn't roll up too dark. Also for registration, he had to start with the paper face up and place the wood block downward but then flip it in order to run it through the press. This made it easier to line up the edges.

The content of Walking Softly is an possum laying dead on the road with tire makes running along side of him. For the tire makes, he actually rolled a spare tire over the wood until he got the shape he wanted. He then cut it out as normal and it printed great. For the grainy texture on the ground, he rubbed glue on the wood and then through sand over the top of it. This also adds an amazing look to his print. This piece of his inspired me to do a print of my dog peeing on a fire-hydrant.

Hirshhorn Museum Response

On my recent trip to Washington, D.C., I had the opportunity to visit some of the nation’s most prestigious art galleries, one of which was the Hirshhorn Museum. While my memory isn’t what it used to be, I can say I remember my experience there with a reasonable amount of lucidity. One thing I noticed about the Hirshhorn’s collection was that it was similar to the MIA’s in that it displayed a lot of offbeat work by well-known artists like Brancussi and Picasso. But what caught my attention above all else was a film, about thirty minutes long, called “The Way Things Go.?

Created by David Weiss and Peter Fischli, the video displayed one long, continuously working contraption in the style of Rube Goldberg. Through a series of catapults, fireballs, and pendulums, the viewer experiences a seemingly endless exercise in pointlessness. There is no practical purpose for the “machine? created for this video; it exists only to amaze and cause wonder, and at that it is spectacularly successful. The sheer amount of time and gasoline that must have been poured into this project is absolutely astounding, and I can’t imagine how long it must have taken to engineer correctly and then finally to run successfully in one go. At no point during the “performance? does the camera turn off or do human hands intervene in the process. In this way, the machine almost takes on a life of its own, becoming a character for whom the audience cheers as he clears one hurdle after the other. As far as art videos, this is my favorite of all time (although Rivers and Tides comes in at a close second), and I was glad to see it’s been successful enough to be marketed on amazon.com, because it really is incredible.

Placement Gallery Response

The artwork that I decided to write about was created by David
Gaul called “New England Boathouse?. It was done with black marker on
paper

The piece of work depicts just how the title describes it. There
is a dock, as well as a small boat in the water. Clouds are also depicted
in the sky. In the center of the paper is a house that has a door and a
window. Gaul creates a landscape that is very peaceful to look at.

I think the style that Gaul uses for this picture fits the compulsive
drawing theme well. No part in the drawing contains a single line in the
drawing where the marker would move from one point to another.
All it contains is single dot markings. Gaul using proximity and frequency
of the dots from the marker to correlate with darker and lighter colors in
his drawing. He also puts the dots very close together to represent some
shadows in the drawing. This style turns out to work well and is very
interestingly done.

Placement Gallery Response

When I arrived at the Placement Gallery, I was pleasantly surprised to find it in such a unique and raw area. I thought it really emphasized the pieces that were displayed there in ways that a more finished area would not have. I enjoyed many of the works and found them to be extremely detailed and fascinating. One such work, titled “Home? by Melissa Gahagan, caught my eye for the majority of my time spent there.

Gahagan used pencil on paper to create an image of a man and a woman embracing. At first glance, they appeared to be in a setting of oddly detailed rocks (background) and flowing waves (under their feet). Also when I continued to view the work, I noticed that the two people were embracing but that their arms were distorted; only two arms (maybe one from each person) were embracing and at odd positions. The other two arms, one on each side of the couple were not embracing each other but instead, they were stretched straight out and each was holding a bloody heart with severed arteries. This was very interesting to me. The piece took on a very serious and dramatic mood as opposed to the serene feeling it evoked upon a short viewing. I stood longer to observe more because the work was slightly puzzling to me. With such a warm title “Home? but slightly gory subject matter and the unexplainable background, I felt lost yet very engaged in the piece. I thought it was interesting that when I stood back from the piece, what jumped out at me was not the embracing couple, but the shapes of the background (what seemed at first like a background of patterned rocks). From a distance, they seemed to resemble two profiles facing each other, with one looking up at the other. I wondered if this was almost a close-up of the two people embracing.
All in all, the artist knew how to engage a viewer and, although I did not find a specific connection to obsessive compulsive disorder in this piece (besides the very intricate detail), this piece spoke a lot to me about the artist’s perceptions of a relationship (whether generally or personally).

Let me begin by saying I’ve never been a fan of looped animation, especially when it’s used constantly in a piece. Blame it on years of having to watch Speed Racer with my cousin. That said, I’m far too lazy to probably EVER animate my own work frame by frame. So when I saw this video by Jenny Schmid, I had to sympathize.
The artwork is beautiful, no doubt, and the way it’s all put together is clever (somehow, although I failed to understand what the piece meant). I sort of hate flash animation, though. To me, it’s like someone figured out the least lifelike way to animate anything, and then made it the most popular platform of its kind in the world. But, once again, I understand Schmid probably didn’t have much choice about what animation tools she could use for this project. And who knows? Maybe she LOVES flash. It’s a free country.
Either way, her work as a printmaker has really rubbed off on her animation (on purpose, I imagine), and to good effect. The characters emulate her unique style and fit strangely in to the world Schmid has created. I just wish I knew what she meant to express in this video, because it appears that she did a lot of work to make it happen.

Animation Response


Today we watched an animation called “Utopia in Progress? created by Jenny Schmid. I enjoyed the animation. I think Schmid did a great job in this short animation.

I believe the animation was a combination of printmaking that were using in a stop-motion effect to give the illusion of animation. While the animation was not very fluid, the music added helped the animation give some motion in my eyes. The music was changed often to notify a scene or character change in the animation. A good combination of music that matched well with each scene added to my enjoyment.

The background for the animation consisted of a variety of pictures. Sometimes there were multiple layers working around the printmaking to help give more depth to the animation. Multiple times throughout the animation the drawings were made larger or smaller to help give scale with the background it was working with. This helped give a three-dimensional feel to the two-dimensional objects.

Overall, I enjoyed this animation. My favorite effect was at the end where purple bubbles emitted from the girl playing on the drums. The bubbles grew in scale and got larger until they covered the screen entirely.

Paper Trails Response

When I first walked into the “Paper Trails? exhibit, not too many of the
works really moved me. Some of the pieces seemed to be as shallow as the
paper cutouts used to create them and in return, I did not stay long at the
pieces to try to figure them out.

I came to a smaller corridor where finally
I met with images that made me stay and gawk for a while, one of these being
“Vanilla Nightmares #3,9, &10" by Adrian Piper, created back in 1986. Walking
up to these pieces of old, tarnished news papers reminded me of going through
old newspapers and catalogues you find stored in your attic, almost like
going back into time. Walking closer to the sheets of old newspaper tacked to
the wall, these images started to pop out of the pages. At first it seems
like these images were not deliberately and some what chaotically printed on
these pages of newspaper, almost like the printing company made a mistake,
but a closer look comes to reveal that these images are actually drawn onto
these pages.
Being a passionate drawer myself, I was a little amazed by the realistic
look of these images sketched over articles, and I admired that Adrian Piper
dared to draw over printed articles and was moved by her ability to
incorporate these images into the paper as if maybe they belonged next to the
articles they were illustrated by. Taking a closer look at the images, I
noticed not only were these images of African-American people, but they were
drawn in such a manner that reminded me of images of oppressed slaves or
similar issues such as the disturbing images shown over the television back
when the civil rights movement was going on. I also began to see the
connection between the articles and the images as well. Each image of an
oppressed African-American was shown next to an article with a topic having
something to do with a professional and powerful Caucasian-American, often
involving politics. Putting both the articles and the images together, it
came to my attention that this was a political piece. These powerful images
of discrimination drawn in graphite and charcoal on newspaper were addressing
racial issues, affirmative action, alienation, and current affairs,
especially the ones that were taking place a few decades ago.
This project that she started by taking all of these newspaper articles and
creating some kind of opposing image to represent the discrimination of
African-American people really moved me to look at the deeper meaning of some
of the things we read in the newspaper today. I think that she made a smart
move by creating these semi-controversial images/pieces and attacking some of
society in such a way to get her point across in a strong way, but also in a
non-insulting way for the rest of society (i.e. insulting dirty-white
politicians but not insulting the rest of white America).

Paper Trails Response

When I first walked into the “Paper Trails? exhibit, not too many of the
works really moved me. Some of the pieces seemed to be as shallow as the
paper cutouts used to create them and in return, I did not stay long at the
pieces to try to figure them out.

I came to a smaller corridor where finally
I met with images that made me stay and gawk for a while, one of these being
“Vanilla Nightmares #3,9, &10" by Adrian Piper, created back in 1986. Walking
up to these pieces of old, tarnished news papers reminded me of going through
old newspapers and catalogues you find stored in your attic, almost like
going back into time. Walking closer to the sheets of old newspaper tacked to
the wall, these images started to pop out of the pages. At first it seems
like these images were not deliberately and some what chaotically printed on
these pages of newspaper, almost like the printing company made a mistake,
but a closer look comes to reveal that these images are actually drawn onto
these pages.
Being a passionate drawer myself, I was a little amazed by the realistic
look of these images sketched over articles, and I admired that Adrian Piper
dared to draw over printed articles and was moved by her ability to
incorporate these images into the paper as if maybe they belonged next to the
articles they were illustrated by. Taking a closer look at the images, I
noticed not only were these images of African-American people, but they were
drawn in such a manner that reminded me of images of oppressed slaves or
similar issues such as the disturbing images shown over the television back
when the civil rights movement was going on. I also began to see the
connection between the articles and the images as well. Each image of an
oppressed African-American was shown next to an article with a topic having
something to do with a professional and powerful Caucasian-American, often
involving politics. Putting both the articles and the images together, it
came to my attention that this was a political piece. These powerful images
of discrimination drawn in graphite and charcoal on newspaper were addressing
racial issues, affirmative action, alienation, and current affairs,
especially the ones that were taking place a few decades ago.
This project that she started by taking all of these newspaper articles and
creating some kind of opposing image to represent the discrimination of
African-American people really moved me to look at the deeper meaning of some
of the things we read in the newspaper today. I think that she made a smart
move by creating these semi-controversial images/pieces and attacking some of
society in such a way to get her point across in a strong way, but also in a
non-insulting way for the rest of society (i.e. insulting dirty-white
politicians but not insulting the rest of white America).

Paper Trails Response

When I first walked into the “Paper Trails? exhibit, not too many of the
works really moved me. Some of the pieces seemed to be as shallow as the
paper cutouts used to create them and in return, I did not stay long at the
pieces to try to figure them out.

I came to a smaller corridor where finally
I met with images that made me stay and gawk for a while, one of these being
“Vanilla Nightmares #3,9, &10" by Adrian Piper, created back in 1986. Walking
up to these pieces of old, tarnished news papers reminded me of going through
old newspapers and catalogues you find stored in your attic, almost like
going back into time. Walking closer to the sheets of old newspaper tacked to
the wall, these images started to pop out of the pages. At first it seems
like these images were not deliberately and some what chaotically printed on
these pages of newspaper, almost like the printing company made a mistake,
but a closer look comes to reveal that these images are actually drawn onto
these pages.
Being a passionate drawer myself, I was a little amazed by the realistic
look of these images sketched over articles, and I admired that Adrian Piper
dared to draw over printed articles and was moved by her ability to
incorporate these images into the paper as if maybe they belonged next to the
articles they were illustrated by. Taking a closer look at the images, I
noticed not only were these images of African-American people, but they were
drawn in such a manner that reminded me of images of oppressed slaves or
similar issues such as the disturbing images shown over the television back
when the civil rights movement was going on. I also began to see the
connection between the articles and the images as well. Each image of an
oppressed African-American was shown next to an article with a topic having
something to do with a professional and powerful Caucasian-American, often
involving politics. Putting both the articles and the images together, it
came to my attention that this was a political piece. These powerful images
of discrimination drawn in graphite and charcoal on newspaper were addressing
racial issues, affirmative action, alienation, and current affairs,
especially the ones that were taking place a few decades ago.
This project that she started by taking all of these newspaper articles and
creating some kind of opposing image to represent the discrimination of
African-American people really moved me to look at the deeper meaning of some
of the things we read in the newspaper today. I think that she made a smart
move by creating these semi-controversial images/pieces and attacking some of
society in such a way to get her point across in a strong way, but also in a
non-insulting way for the rest of society (i.e. insulting dirty-white
politicians but not insulting the rest of white America).

Flipbook Animation

Irony Core (first version)

Media Mill Video









Utopia Response

I thought “Utopia: A Work in Progress? by Jenny Schmid was very interesting. After three times of watching it, I still don’t really understand why the things that happen happen, or what the different symbols mean. But I did find that I really enjoyed the use of music in the animation. It all really flowed nicely because beats came on cue, and it just worked together. I also thought it was cool how she used real life photographs and put the animated drawings over that. It was obvious she was not trying to make the drawings look like they matched their surroundings, so that was very interesting. I guess I don’t really have any idea if there is supposed to be a message relayed from this animation, but if there is, I would really like to know what it is and what the symbolism is all about.

Chambers Hotel Response

First I just wanted to say that I really enjoyed visiting the Chambers Hotel.
It was really exciting to look at all of the piece of work and to receive a tour.
I also enjoyed listening to Jennifer Phelps describe each piece of work and why
it was placed in certain spots of the hotel. The work I observed at the hotel
was created by Gavin Turk in 2004. It is called “Pile? and is created in a form
of painted bronze.

I found this piece to be very interesting since when I first saw
it I didn’t even notice it as being art. A worker at the hotel was moping
the floor next to it and I just considered it trash. There were five black
trash bags on the floor in the corner. They looked very real. As well I
was able to notice which appeared like boxes and other items inside the
trash bags that appeared to be trying to poked through the bag. It truly
seemed like there were just trash bags laying on the floor of the hotel.
I was shocked to hear then that this was a piece of work. Gavin
Turk takes everyday objects such as bin bags, sleeping bags, and coffee
cups and cast them in bronze. He then paints them to look real. It was also
stated that “his work is wry and ironic, underlying the way artists can
transform an objects value and confer a canonical status to something that
is literary ‘rubbish’ and usually overlooked.? I believe this explanation
fits his work perfectly since I had the same reaction to it the first time
I saw it.

Flipbook Animation Project









Archives Clip 2








Hello this is the second clip for the appropriated video. The first video was very fun to do so I went back to archive.org and got more clips of stuff. It is very similar to the my first video with some of the same clips. I am still getting use to Final Cut Pro so some of clips are cut wrong. I am very sorry that it happen that way. There is new background music in the clip to make it more action like. Hopefully it works well with the new clip. Once again it has kung fu stuff in it. I like to thank Archives.org for all of the clips. If you, the viewers want to watch the orginal stuff from my clip go to archives.org and type in the search for Team Ryouko, flips and tricks, and/or ninja. Enjoy!

Placement Gallery Response

So basically, after viewing these drawings from the Placement Gallery, I felt a sense of obsessive-compulsive disorder myself. These drawings created an extremely unsettled feeling in me, and it made me want to see much more simple, colorful things. It is hard for me to even begin to explain what is going on in these drawings. There is so much going on in each drawing, that it is hard to even concentrate on certain parts. It seems obvious to me that all the madness going on in each piece of art has to do with all of the crazy things going through each of the artist’s heads, but it is hard for me to dig much deeper into it. I would like to learn more about Nick Howard’s drawings with everybody in the pictures having multiple mouths...some connected, some just people with sharp teeth. I would assume there is some kind of meaning behind this, or else they are just obsessive-compulsive ideas running through his mind, and he needs to get them out. Overall, I found the exhibit a little disturbing because there is so much happening, and it is a lot to wrap my mind around. After looking at this gallery, I could definitely go for a few minutes looking at something very simple and relaxing.

Animation








Chambers Hotel Response

I found the visit to the Chambers Hotel to be very interesting. The whole concept of the hotel is very cool and original. There were some things I liked about the place, and some things I did not like so much. First of all, I think it’s amazing that every single piece of art in the hotel is original, and each room gets at least two. I thought the round, revolving painting just outside of the lobby by Damien Hirst was very pleasing to the eye. That was a great piece to be able to see from the beginning of that hallway to the end. The gorilla in the sculpture garden was pretty interesting too. I would like to see that garden at night because it looked like it lights up well. I also really enjoyed the stairwell. The graffiti done by the graffiti artists was incredible. It was a great idea to wind it all the way up the five flights of stairs. There is always something new to see in there. I did not really appreciate the lounge upstairs. I understand they needed something to really stand out since there was not a lot of wall space, but it seemed very strange having a profanity do that job. Why not something that is just extremely eye-catching? The other thing I didn’t like was the painting in the bar of the man getting ready for work with the blow up doll and pornographic pictures in the background. This just seems totally unnecessary to have in a public bar. I think much more people would be uncomfortable or feel offended by this than find it interesting. Overall, the trip was very interesting and I would definitely visit the hotel again.

Chambers Hotel Response

Chambers Luxury Art Hotel was a very unique experience! I enjoyed many of the works there including the stairwell graffiti, Damien Hirst’s spin painting, “Blinded by the Light? in the lobby area and others.

However, one piece that struck me in a different way. Named “L.W.S.2.? and created by Ashley Bickerton in 2001, Chambers displayed this large piece in the bar area. The artist used both screen print and painting to create this work of a man in a room with all his technology. The man is portrayed as a businessman, wearing dress clothes and putting on a tie. Around the room lie many signs of our technologically-advanced society: a cell phone, laptop, television, DVD’s, CD’s, etc. The man also has a blow-up doll in his bed and pornography smothers the wall in background.

I found this piece really moving because it reflects our society very accurately in my mind. As time goes by and I get older, I am realizing how much many people, including myself dislike dependence (in even the smallest ways) on other people. This picture definitely demonstrates how people live in order to escape depending on others. Bickerton even used the light shining through the blinds on the windows to compliment the idea that depending only on ourselves actually makes us a slave to other things (such as technology). The light shines in stripes and lands on the back wall of the piece. The lines cross and create a pattern that resembles prison bars.

An interesting aspect to this work is the man’s facial expression. It is very hard to guess what he is thinking or feeling. I feel that the artist may have left it that way in order for the viewer to wonder. One knows that the man probably isn’t truly happy (due to his time only with inanimate objects) but is he showing temporary happiness, frustration, apathy or pained realization? I liked this piece mostly because I feel that it is very accurate in portraying both our society and parts of myself. To me, it said "Living the way this man does makes for an extremely unhappy and unfulfilling life."

Fresh Works Response

The work I decided to observe was created by Aaron Schmidt in
2007. It was a stainless steal sculpture laying on the floor, called
“M.A.D. (mutually assured destruction)?.

The sculpture depicts two skeletons wrestling. It isn’t possible
to tell if they are male or female. One of the skeletons has its back
laying on the ground with the other is on top of it. The one on top obviously
seems more dominant since it is winning the struggle. The skeleton on top is
strangling the other skeleton by the neck with its left hand and holding
down the skeleton the bottom’s left hand with his right hand. While the skeleton
on the bottom is trying to push the top skeleton off.
I thought this was an interesting piece and a great sculpture to
look at. The skeletons are life size and easily catches one's eye. I also
found it interesting that the skeleton on top, the more dominant one, had
it part of its skull where one's forehead and eyes are were gone. I thought
this might possibly be describing how it can’t see the destruction it was doing.

Appropriated Footage Project

Dr. Falwell or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Church

Media Mill Video








The presence of Evangelical Christianity in the United States presents many unique conflicts and duplicities within our culture as a nation. While this sect of the Christian faith only makes up about one quarter of the American population, it seems the other three quarters have taken up the role of the silent majority, allowing the outspoken church to have its way in shaping politics and social structure here and abroad. I compiled this film because I rarely see the depth and severity of the struggle between Evangelical Christianity and society at large portrayed in the media with any kind of justice.

There are two major conflicts presented by the Church. First, There is the obvious clash between the faith’s idea of a “righteous? society and the society that actually exists. Evangelicals feel they are living in a sick, sad world, the end of which will be a blessing. As they ascend to heaven on the day of the Rapture, the sinners and unbelievers will remain to suffer on the earth forever, without any hope of finding Christ. So one might say that in this video, Evangelicals are represented by people who die in in the divine wind of a nuclear attack, while the survivors are unbelievers left to wallow in the fallout. Then there is the battle between evangelism and other, more moderate sects of Christianity (which I chose to represent in the video with a man solemnly reading the bible in a dark room). While Methodists, Lutherans, moderate Catholics and Episcopalians attempt to talk sense into Evangelicals and Fundamentalists, they are accused of depurifying the faith and supporting a liberal agenda.

I chose to incorporate into this film footage from both fictional and documentary sources. Most of the soldiers in the film are actors, but the Japanese bomb victims are real. I felt this was a justified and even appropriate response to the conduct of the Evangelical church, which feels perfectly comfortable confusing fact and fiction on a regular basis. You could say that this is a fantasy film in that it portrays realistically the ultimate goals of the Evangelical mindset.

Zhou ming Photo (China)

Zhou Ming, 2002, Photography. Weisman
At the Documenting China contemporary photography and social change exhibit I picked out an interesting photo of two young women. The portrayal was interesting because it displays change happening in china. Leisure time.

The women were at a café smoking cigarettes. They were sitting right in front of a large window. The photo was taken from the outside looking in. This gave more of a feeling of spying because the women were not looking at the viewers; they were just enjoying leisure time. There was a very old bike parked against the front window of the window. The bike gave good contrast to the young women in their hip fashion.
This show examines the response to radical cultural change from the photographers of China. I got to thinking about my life. I have always lived in America, no radical change. I think the closest I have been to radical change, and missed entirely, is the depression. I don’t really know first hand what social change is. While viewing the different photos, I see some portray tough lives and some show young adults having fun at the bar. These young folks look like their just clubbing it like I use too.
All in all I think it’s partly a confusing time for these people, young and old trying to mesh. It seems the young are so modern, while the older retain tradition. It would be difficult for me to live in China if I was not in the large city.

Animation Response

Jenni Schmidt's animation "Utopia" was an extremely abstract piece, focusing on a composition of multiple scenes having little to no connectivity to one another. Although continuity existed between recurring characters, anything resembling narrative structure seems to end right there. The characters appear to be partaking in some random action in every sequence, forming continuity only through the use of certain objects and characters (for example, with a meteor or a boy reading a book). Though Schmidt obviously had an intended message to be displayed by the sequence of actions, I was unable to pick up on it. I did find merit in the drawings of the characters and interplay between the background photographs and mattes, and the character forms. However, the animation was extremely simplistic and made the movement feel unnatural, particularly when the girl bumps in to the boy (and the action freezes for a second). The soundtrack was worth noting on this piece, as it particularly stands out in my mind after watching the film. It performed its purpose well, as it was the primary tool for defining the personalities of the characters; therefore, the girl was always featured with a louder tune and rock or dance-style drumbeat, while the boy was always featured with a gentler, harmonic piece. Overall, this was a piece with a very complex composition, achieving many goals of expression effectively, and obscuring othergoals with its unique form of expression

Freshworks

Jon Mahnke, Skin Crawl series, Pigmented Inkjet, 2007
A big orange web? Is that what that is? It is called Skin Crawl Series, Pigmented Inkjet. What is pigmented inkjet? Totally befuddled I decide to sit a few and figure this thing out.

The over all color is a burnt orange, made up of lines that could be made by ink but that doesn’t mean I know what the process of pigmented inkjet is. The lines go every direction but they don’t crisscross in a harsh way. Each thing looks very serene and melodious, like there was a plan to it all. I walk up close the picture at get a different view.
All of the lines are made from tertiary colors in the orange color spectrum, from the lightest yellow orange, to the darkest almost red orange. All of these dark and light colors form the layers of the web. The darker red-oranges are in areas that seem to have the most layers, and the light colors are in areas of fewer layers. I decide to go up way close.
It looks like there is a light yellow under painting which adds to the harmony of the overall piece. The yellow keeps from having no jarring white stops as your eyes flow across the work. Another addition to the harmony is little breaks in the scene, like clouds in the sky. Little yellow background teardrop shaped circles break up the orange hash mark lines. The circles are about an inch and a half in size and they’re about a third of an inch from each other, all over. So you can imagine these little breaks are big part of this work.
The longer I stood in front of the work the more I liked it. All of the lines swirled me in, and the teardrop circles were a comfortable place to hang out.

Fresh Works Response

I visited the “Fresh Works,? galleries in Regis Hall, and I was struck by the quality of all the different works of art. It is amazing to think that students the same age as me are making such detailed, meaningful pieces of art. I was deciding between “Mutually Assured Destruction? and “I am so Sorry? to write about because they both struck me as very interesting, but I decided to go with “I am so Sorry? by Lauren Herzak-Bauman. It was made from porcelain in 2007. The thing about this work of art is that it is not what it seems at first glance. From a distance, it looks like a bunch of twisted up porcelain put together, but as you get closer, you realize it says “I am so sorry? written in cursive over and over, one on top of another. I think the meaning behind this work is ‘things are not always what they appear to be.’ Also, it could represent what is happening between two people in that someone is really, truly sorry for something, but the person they are apologizing to sees nothing in them. It represents the struggles in communication and feelings between people.

Documenting China Response

I enjoyed going to the exhibit, Documenting China : Contemporary
Photography and Social Change, at the Weisman Art Museum. It was great to
see photography and works by a variety of photographers capturing the
different areas in China over the past couple of decades. I liked how they
each carried a different style to their pieces and how they captured what
they were trying to express and share in that period of time. I ended up
choosing a couple of pieces to write a response on.

The first was this stunning image taken by Zhou Hai in Liaonig in
1996. In the background lay a steel factory emitting black and grey clouds
in the luminous sky. In the front of the picture there was a worker trying
to climb over a railing onto safety that appeared to be overlooking some
high ground. The way the picture was taken made the worker appear he could
be falling or climbing back over. This was a great image that I think
helped show the contradiction of how the Chinese media has expressed that
the country’s economic growth has offered its citizens many great
opportunities. However, the question lies, at what cost?

The second image that I expressed interest in was by Zhang Xinmin,
taken in Guangdong in 1997. The image was very peculiar because it appeared
to contain many groupings of people inside small and compact boxes.
Apparently a serious inadequate supply of housing for the workers in the
growing cities has left many workers to construct these extremely small
cubicles made out of bamboo, plywood, cardboard, and other recycled
material. I just found it to be shocking that people were living like this
and I believe Xinmin did a great job capturing the hardships that the
people in China have been going through.

Chambers Response

Paul Winstanley’s Utopia, an oil painting, is the kind of art I like, realistic. When I am in a gallery I am always drawn towards the paintings and drawings that look like they could be photographs, but they’re not photographs. I don’t know if I am just super impressed with the artist’s talent or if I am

just stunned that I cant tell that I am looking at a painting or drawing. Wait a minute is someone playing a trick on me, this is a lie that has to be a photo, right?
Paul’s piece also had another quality that I liked. Shininess. Shiny metal surfaces seemed to be the dominant surface to most of the work. This trait only added to the realism of the art. I just thought of some art at the university of Minnesota Fresheworks show, it seems to have such a similar style as this. But I believe that one is a photograph. I think it was called something like Ghettos Of Utopia.
The similarities are the black, white, gray qualities to both these works. Also the subject matter is the same; Paul Winstenley’s work seems to be a public interior of a high class downtown office building. The students work seemed to be a photo of a public hallway in front of a large window, with a built in standing binocular overlooking the city.
I definitely plan to return to the Chambers Hotel and spend more time with the art. Many other pieces intrigued me, like the one with the Asian guy and the blow-up doll. The idea of a self-contained life was sad. I don’t know if I would have understood that that is what the idea being portrayed had someone not have told me.


The Diane Willow's class critique really gave me a more complete understanding of what interactive art really is. The goal of these pieces was obviously to harbor an interaction between the viewer and the artwork, making the art rely, at least to some extent, on the actions of the viewer. The piece that stood out most to me was "I'm on Fire," created by a student who created a video feed that automatically made a series of spark-like red dots rise upward around movement, making the subject appear to be on fire. This struck me as a very clever idea; though it does not have any specific cultural implications or deep subjects, its still visually striking and engages the viewer to an extent beyond any time/interactive-based artwork i have yet seen. I believe that the other piece that really demands note was the piece featured at the door (I unfortunately did not record the title) in which every person entering the door would trigger a reaction in the computer screen nearby, which would continually project one new part of the full image on to the wall. The most charming part of this piece was a sort of underlying idealism behind it; the idea that every person coming by would contribute to the final piece is a particularly inspiring sentiment.

Fresh Works Response

The piece by Stacey M. Holloway, titled "Why does the cooped chicken dance?: Music Box" intrigued me due to its presentation, content and form.

I enjoyed that the artist used visual and audio components to convey her message(s). Made of wood, cast bronze, motors, a music box, and steel in 2007, she successfully utilized these elements by combining them into a simple A-frame hen house. Upon closer observation, the house is quite elaborate with very flush, sanded edges, designs in the woodgrain and wires carefully hidden. The sign reads "PLEASE OPEN DOOR". As I opened the door, the first thing I noticed was the shadow which was casted by the spinning chicken inside. It landed, stretched length-wise and eerie on the bits of
hay in the corner and sides of interior. I wonder if this was the artist's intent-to use the shadow as a focal point of the piece. As I stood further, I recognized the song that the music box was playing: "You are My Sunshine". I thought this was interesting because I immediately thought of the Weisman display we viewed two weeks ago. Was the artist intending to suggest the changes we (humans and animals) feel when the seasons change? I am not an expert on animals or SAD by any means, but I wouldn't doubt that many moods and thus actions of a variety of creatures change with the seasons. I kept looking at this piece because I did not feel as though a clear message was relayed or emotion evoked (other than lots of curiousity). I noticed that the wind signal was pointing almost straight east, there was a bull skull on the front of the house and that although there was a carefully made lamp hanging on the interior, it was not lit. If any of you viewed this piece and reacted to it more than being filled with such curiousity (I had to write about it), please feel free to respond!

Filpbook Process Statement

I thought the Flipbook project was both challenging and enjoyable. My process began with simple research about flipbooks.

I had never made one before and although I understood the concept of multiple drawings I had nothing else to be inspired by. Many websites and tutorials proved helpful online, giving tips and triggering ideas for my own flipbook. Humor is something I hardly ever am drawn to in works of art but in the flipbook
project, I wanted to experiement with humorous ideas. However as time went on and I worked on my own book, I realized how interesting it was that within my small picture plane, there was a metamorphis of a landscape going on. Instead of focusing on figures acting within the landscape, I concentrated on the landscape itself as the subject. I find it interesting how my own "landscapes" change dramatically- from my bedroom to the East Bank Campus of the University of Minnesota to the entire Mississippi view
from the Witch's Tower in St. Paul. Through my flipbook, I wanted to examine the metamorphis of a landscape through both man-made and natural events over the course of time.

Placement Gallery response

I went to the Placement Gallery and found an interesting artwork that seemed very strange yet made me unable to walk away from. The artwork was by Ben Boylan and the work was called, “Whisper Low Priest.?

At a distance I found the work strange I did not know what I was looking at. It was a drawing with many curves and lines. The background was created with a mix of media that made it look very ancient. Because of the lines that were in the artwork it made my eyes move around to try and see were one line begins and where one line ends. In my opinion it was a very cool artwork. At first I thought it was a skull then I saw eyeballs. But because of the lines that waved around the work my eyes was unable to focus too much on one area. Many of the artworks that I enjoy are when they use shade I a way that makes my eyes move. Maybe that is the reason as to why this piece stood out from the others. His main use of shade is found near the bottom and lightens up as it heads up the paper. Also were the lines darkening really made the color bounce off each other even though there was not much color there.

As for the artwork I believe that it was great. As for the title I am still unable to see as to why it is called “Whisper Low Priest.? I do not see a priest, but I believe the lines were the whispers. I do not really know, mainly because I am not an artist and am unable to full grasp the true meaning. But that does not stop me from enjoying the artwork made by Ben Boylan.

Enchanted Response

The "Enchanted" exhibit proved to be an amazing collection of works! I particularly was engaged in viewing the video "Catch and Release" as well as "The Price of Freedom". Another work that stuck out to me due to my curiousity about it, was "Divination Altar" (2007) by Carol Lumpart. It appeared as a table with two large butterfly wings resting on it (in flying position).

However, there was also an item made of aluminum resting on the table and against the left wing. It looked like a small branch and the aluminum made it stick out from the wings and table. The wings had swirling lines of metal on them and they were all just the color of the metal. However, the branch was lighter and caught the light quite differently from the rest. I was curious what the artist's background was and what this work meant to her. There was nothing written on the labels by her works. I wonder if her concepts for "Divination Altar" have anything to do with ideas surrounding sacrifice. The small branch almost reminds me of how at times, I have much to offer others and at other times, I have nothing to offer. The range of beautiful butterfly to small branch comments on this
idea for me. It also speaks of the significance of seemingly "small" ideas/thoughts/actions. How important are they in reality? In different spaces, does the significance lessen, alter or multiply? Can
ideas/thoughts/actions even be "small'? What if it concerns something we offer (as one would at an altar)? Do we have anything to offer there, at a divination altar? This sparks a discussion on divinity in my mind. Divine thoughts/ideas/actions? It interests me to think on these things. I have to say that I know I have nothing to offer as divine and most of the time I have nothing to offer that is even purely good (mixed motives, etc). Only through my relationship with Jesus Christ have I been able to consider how I am constantly seeking myself even in what seems to be good/moral.. even in things one might consider to be "offerings". When I come to the altar of the Triune God, I have nothing to offer. I have no control and He has it all. All I can do is trust that He is good and I can do that because my life is already a living example of how nothing was wasted. Everything came about because of His plan for my happiness. He gets the credit, I get the joy in life. "Divination Altar" may address completely different issues in the mind of others but it brings me back to the only thing that has brought me true happiness, a personal relationship with Jesus.

Download file

Documenting China Response

At the documenting China exhibit, which I readily admit I was late in seeing, I noticed many things I had not previously acknowledged about the way Chinese art is developing as a means for that nation to communicate in a way that transcends language and culture. Present in many of the photographs at the exhibition were themes which are ubiquitous across all cultures; the involuntary replacement of tradition and culture in the name of “modernism,? the complex interaction between the government and media, and the juxtaposition of generations of people of different ages and clearly different backgrounds.

One photo I found especially engaging featured a young couple posed against the wall of their home. The drab scene in which the couple stands in nice clothing serves to highlight what the artist (Jiang Jian) wanted to illustrate within the photo; behind the couple, upon the wall, are several posters, one of which displays a Chinese pop star, the other of which is an old-fashioned scroll displaying spiritual writing and imagery. The clash between these two images is relevant on many levels: the coexistence of “old? China and “new? China, the way youth culture has responded to the freedom allowed by new political leaders, the responsibility young people in China for upholding the traditions of their ancestors, etc. It truly is a powerful image which could hardly be more relevant to the cultural changes occurring in China today.
Another picture that caught my attention was Zhou Ming’s Untitled (No.1), shot in 2002. It depicts a large poster of Chairman Mao (not a difficult thing to find in China), behind which is tucked a shop that sells phonograph players and, I believe, radios. The explanation of this photo was that it ties together Mao and the media in China during his reign. It is relevant because Mao and his government was able to control most of what the People’s Republic saw and heard. But I think of this picture in a wholly different way—I think that the fact that the phonograph shop is behind the poster’s “back,? it could have very different connotations about rebellious media. It’s an allegory on how even the most powerful and intrusive of governments can’t control everything, especially not what people think and say to one another. This also seems to have been the case with Jiang Jian’s Zhao Lanying, 74, Hui County, Henan. We see an old woman, once again using the wall of her home as a backdrop, standing in front of a large religious poster. This is something that would not have been allowed under the old regime, and one must ponder at the fact that this woman must have kept this poster for many years under the threat of harsh penalties.
I think this exhibit really helped me to understand better the China that is now emerging for the rest of the world to see, which is certainly valuable. More Americans should be so lucky as to see these photographs and subsequently improve their perspectives on a nation that many of us know dangerously little about.

Holbrook Response

While I was going through Patrick Holbrook's works on his website, I was really struggling to understand anything he was doing. Finally I got to "Deep Pop Songs," and I read the captions multiple times, watched the videos multiple times, and looked at the pictures for a long time. Finally, his ideas started to make sense in my mind. But every time I thought I was getting it, I would have to really rack my brain to go further with it. So basically, what you have is a large screen playing a loop of someone running down the 2 liter soda bottle aisle at grocery stores, with vinyl tubing running from that screen with soda flowing through it into a mini screen with interviews about the music group 'The Smiths', and then more vinyl tubing going into a bucket filling it with soda. The caption mentions that there is some meaning of looking beneath the surface of things. He said The Smiths kept him from going mainstream with his life when he was a teenager. So from this, one of the ideas I got was that he was going beneath the surface with the soda bottles. The intended use of the soda bottles is to drink the soda from them, but Holbrook uses them to play music. He is going against the grain by creating music from bottles, and not doing what they are meant for. He says by using things in your own, original way, you are preventing yourself from becoming a victim of corporate power and becoming a producer of our own meaning. Going further with this, the soda in the bucket is meant to represent deep lake water-cooling systems. He said he found these fascinating throughout his research. These systems are ways for people who live near the great lakes to air-condition their homes. So I got the idea that this is another example of going beyond the surface. Rather than using lakes for a source of water and other common uses, they can be used to do something totally original like air conditioning. I'm not at all sure of what the vinyl tubing is for...I got the impression that it is meant to create a flow between the soda bottle video, to the interview, to the bucket. It's kind of like each one is a step toward the idea that with just about everything, there is more than what meets the eye. Overall, I found this work to be very fascinating and thought provoking. I think it really makes you work to discover the deeper meaning of Holbrook's work, but I really like that the viewers need to think to understand his work.

Speakers

Mauricio Arango

- It was interesting the multitude of things that could be
done in flash. I enjoyed looking at the different project he had
accomplished and what he is continuing to work on. Flash isn't only used
for animation projects. It can work in conjunction of scripts to do a
variety of things. The language that is used in Flash is called ActionScript.

Mauricio also showed us some great websites. The kirupa website has some great
tutorials that I think will help me learn a lot that I can do in flash.

www.kirupa.com
www.friendsofed.com (flash books)

Jamason Chen

- It was interesting to hear his discussion about what is art,
what is an artist? The photograph or the photographer? It was also
interesting to see his take on the digital age versus film concerning
photography and to hear his take on the advantages of each with rising
technology.

BA/BFA Response

I really enjoyed a series of digital collages by Mina Bayani. One in particular titled "Ecstacy of Existence in the Beyond" (2007) provoked many thoughts and skillfully displayed formal elements.

The work is a compilation of three main images: a bomb cloud, a Persian design (the type used as a rug pattern) and an image of a woman. The Persian pattern lies in what seems to be the background and incorporates mostly desaturated hues of brown and earthy red. However, there are some hints of brighter orange (still desaturated but brighter than the other colors) and also of a beautiful blue. This blue, vibrant and seemingly neon, is the same color that the woman is. She lies in the foreground in a beautiful arching pose-- pointed toes, arched back, head back-- in a very graceful, active and yet calm manner. The bomb cloud is a bright orange that seems to bubble up behind the woman, seeming to lift her in her pose and compliment the bright blue. The work struck me not only because of its extreme visual beauty but also because of the idea of identity which the artist speaks about. The
three main images- comparing and contrasting, complimenting and surreal, alike and opposite- question and address the complexity of identity. The topic of identity interests me very much and not so much the identity of the individual but moreso the identity of the average person. (I do believe
that although we are individual, there is still such a thing as an average person). Anyway, I enjoyed viewing her series because it definitely commented on issues of exploration, women, the individual, the artist herself and indentity.

Placement Gallery Response

One thing I noticed about the Placement Gallery upon my eventual viewing of its displayed work was that it was different from other galleries I had seen previously. I’m not sure what it was about the work that I found so “different.? Perhaps it was the layout; less formal than one normally anticipates in a professional gallery, it reminded me of the elementary school art fairs of my childhood, which isn’t at all a bad thing. The work seemed (and I think if it could have feelings it would have felt) cozy, comfortable, at home.

Of course, what’s important is the art itself, which was also “different.? Different, perhaps because some of it was drawn with sharpie pens. Different, perhaps, because some of it was painted on found junk metal. It all seemed organic in some way. I was reminded now of the craft fairs that polluted my youth, but instead of a monotonous bitterness, I felt nostalgia for these memories of a time it is now shocking to think was over a decade ago. That said, there were three artists which caught my attention: John Fleischer’s He regret he do is a painting that I feel as though I “get,? even though I haven’t the slightest idea what it means or why it was painted. I suppose its appeal for me is purely aesthetic, which isn’t always a bad merit. I can only guess how many women I’ve befriended just because I thought they were good-looking. And some of them have turned out to be excellent friends. So perhaps my relationship with He regret he do will only improve as I learn about it beyond superficial visual appearances. I also loved Melissa Gahagan’s pencil drawing, Home. I suppose the only reason for this is that she draws the way I wish I could draw (well). The other artist whose work was an outstanding attention-grabber for me was Yuri Arajs. His paintings on the aforementioned found metal pieces are minimalist in a way that doesn’t make me have to ponder how and why light interacts with a stack of boxes. The paintings, like Tree, Snow, and Monolith, are all self-explanatory, and are painted with an anal attention to smooth, curvaceous simplicity, the final result reminding me of the background paintings for an episode of Samurai Jack. Arajs knows what he likes, and apparently also what I like.
It’s still not clear to me what was so different about Placement Gallery. Perhaps I’ll never know. Perhaps I’ll figure it out by thinking and thinking and thinking. But I’d like to imagine that one day, it will just hit me and I’ll burst out into some variation on “EUREKA!? I whatever public place I happen to be loitering at the time.

Final








Hello this is my final project another animaiton. Sadly it is only 13 secs. I thought that if I added a few more frames in the flipbook I made it was going to be longer, at least a min. Sadly it did not. The title is called "Random," because it was a random drawings. The whole thing process started with one of my rivals (in drawing) who made it seem like I could not be done with it and still make it look good. Now I am finish and I laugh at you my friend! The music is called Blue Sky. Enjoy!

MFA student exhibit response

The artwork that I found very interesting was the art piece called “Winded? by Sonja Peterson. It was created by Acrylic on Paper in 2007. It is a very cool artwork that is just one gigantic paper that was cut up to the final stage with many hidden things in it if not looks carefully.

Like I said the artwork is very cool and interesting. I was really confused as to why it was called “Winded?. I thought it was going to be an art piece about the wind. At first glance of the artwork I just say a big tree right in the middle. The branches reached out towards the two top corners and the roots stretched to the two-bottom corner. The tree itself was great. I could see that the artist put in a lot of time in the piece and got what she wanted in the end. I still could not see as to why the artwork was called “Winded?. Then I look more closely and found windmills hidden in the branches. Some of the branches were the windmills too. Even further in the artwork there were buildings. It was like a town in the sky, because I could not tell if there was a ground or not. It showed that the artwork had a lot of depth in it. It was a very interesting way of showing depth very different from what I am use to. Also I have never seem an artwork like this so it was interesting that it could be shown that way. It was well hidden because I mainly say the big tree in the middle. I did not even notice the little things in the work until I looked at it more closely. The lighting worked well in the piece even if it was on purpose for putting there or not. The whole artwork was one color so there was not much shading in it if the lights were not there.

I found the color to be a little bit boring and dull. It did not seem as alive as I thought it would after finding the hidden works in the art piece. Maybe if she added a little bit of color to keep the eyes moving. Because of the white wall there were some contrast but it only did so much that my eyes started to wonder off the artwork and made me look even harder to find out the reason for the title. That is the only thing I could think of to make it more better, because when I hear the word wind or winded I think of blues; cool colors or warm. I think some artist can only go so far with just the plain grays and white but overall it was a very cool and interesting work I would not mind see her other works and what she thinks of next.

Sad

It's Sad When You Shoot A Chalkboard

At first glance Chris Larson’s Shotgun Chalkboard Landscape reminded me of
the video Jeremy’s Song by Pearl Jam. The kid in the video shot up the

class and I am sure he hit the chalkboard as well. Then I started to think
about other recent school shootings such as Columbine and Virginia Tech.

Chris Larson’s art description said a 12 gauge shotgun was used to shoot
the board 376 times creating a huge hole. Just a little excessive don’t you
think. Just as the shootings in the school cases were excessive acts.
Excessive also is the size of this peace of work.

A large black rectangle border that is two and a half feet thick and
stretches about fifteen feet wide and ten feet tall, hangs massively on the
gallery wall. The inside of the jagged border is where the gun shots
exploded pieces of the chalkboard away leaving a large hole in the center.
The fact that the hole is simply the wall showing through, produces a
feeling of nothingness while viewing. At initial inspection more attention
is paid to the interesting shapes that the bullets created in the black
board. After all the whole is just the gallery wall it’s not a piece of the
art. Or is it?
At first I thought what’s the point made by shooting a big hole of
nothingness in a chalkboard, other than just to make viewers remember the
school shootings? Now I think the hole has more significance. We all know
now that the school shooters had something missing in their lives like
uninvolved parents or a lack of confidence to deal with preppy assholes in
a less permanent way. That can lead to feelings like a giant hole of
nothingness. Many people create what is missing in their lives, they say it
can be therapeutic. The missing gun hole in the art corresponds to the
school shooters who created many holes with guns. I wonder if they got any
short lived therapy out of their holes.
an older student

Documenting China Response

For the Documenting China I chose the artwork called “untitled" (no.8) 2002 by Zhou Ming. This artwork drew my attention mainly because it there was a dragon in the picture. Like the little descriptions on the side of the picture the dragon represents strong and power. I really like it; it was different from the others because the dragon took up almost all of the upper right of the photo.

The whole artwork was a photo that was shot in china. It was mainly in black and white. For me at least that shows the different types of shade possible. Also there were people near the bottom of the photo. It made the photo more alive because they were on the move so it made it artwork more animated then just plainly standing. I do not mean to offend Zhou Ming’s other photo shots were they were sitting or standing. It just seems that “untitled? (no. 8) was more interesting. In the background there was construction being done to a building. To me it seems to symbolize that they are hardworking people and on the move. Kind of like that each step they make has a meaning to it. I like how the photo was angled. I do not know how to use a camera but I do enjoy looking at art with people who can use it well. The light was very good because it really lit up the photo. Almost everything in the artwork had light in it making it very clear to see what Ming wanted in the photo.

I do not enjoy a lot of photo artworks mainly if it was in black and white, but Ming really changed my mind and made me more open to this kind of media. In his other photos found in the Documenting China exhibit I could feel the feelings of each person that he took a picture of. Each one with a different emotion: sadness, joy, loneliness, pain, curiosity, and a sense of family. Many of the photos were shot with people by themselves or with family or friends. But to me I still believe that “untitled? (no. 8) really stood out from the rest. It did not have a direct person to look at so you are unable to feel the emotion in it but the dragon seems to sum up the feeling. That is maybe why that many of his photos are untitled, maybe there is no real word or feeling that can name it.

Final Project - Animation










This is an updated version of my flip book animation that I brought into Final Cut Pro. I added color to each frame, as well as music and sound effects.

Sound Project










Festival of Appropriation 1

The artwork in this exhibit was all so different. There were paintings, collages, sculptures, and video. It was all great. There was one artist in particular that I enoyed the most.

Micheal Thomsen had several great sculptural pieces. My favorite is titled The Pony Show. It looks like a pony taken from a carousel, but it looks like it's been made out of wax. The inside of the horse is open, and is lined with tube lights that periodically light up. On its forehead is a compass with pencils stuck around it which looks like a halo. Everything is painted with dark, cool colors. Almost everything is blue and purple, but there's some brown and green too. Behind the horse is a long thin mirror. There are a lot of rubber balls and globes painted and glued on the horse. There's a gothic sort of old-fashioned feel about the horse. It's something familiar and innocent remade into something dark and complicated. I loved it.

Changing Hands Response

Response to Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation at the Weisman Art Museum.

I am responding to the Changing Hands exibit at the Weisman Museum. I really think all of the installments were great, and its nice to recognize Native American culture. This exibit really encompasses a lot of what Native American culture was and is like.

The one piece that I would like to respond to is "Bear with Humor" by Rick Bartow. I really enjoyed this piece because it has a lot going on with it. My favorite part is the nails in the shoulders. I like how the hands are like human hands, but there is a bear head.

Frida Kahlo Response

My response to the Frida Kahlo exibit at the Walker Art Center.

I really like Frida Kahlo's paintings. They seem fairly realistic, but you can definately tell they're painted. You can see some of the brush strokes and some things seem kind of flat. I really enjoyed looking at the minor details in her paintings, such as the cigarette she has in her hand in one of her self-portraits. She was definately an interesting looking woman. That unibrow freaked me out a little bit, but it was nice to know that she painted herself just as she was, mustache and all, and not how she wanted herself to look. My favorite painting was "Frieda and Diego Rivera". I really liked her use of colors and the way they seem so posed and rigid. Usually this isn't a good thing, but it really worked out well for this painting.

Appropriated Film

This is my appropriated film project. I tried to make it have rhythm and be kind of a commentary on American life.








Studio E

I had no idea that we had studios like the ones in Rarig until we had the tour. I am so impressed with the wonderful equipment, and the people that work there. They were so helpful during our shoot.

The studio E experience was great. Everyone worked hard, and did their part. I learned how to set up microphones on people, and how it's all connected to the sound booth in the production room. I had a lot of fun running the sound booth during the shoot. I was able to control how everything sounded. I even had control over the headsets the filmin crew was wearing. It's was kinda like playing God. It was great that no one knew what they were really doing, but they were still working hard. I was and still am intimidated by the equipment in studio E, but now I won't have any problems with asking for help. I want to learn how to run every single thing in studio E, but I don't know if that'll ever happen.

Patrick Holbrook

One thing I noticed which seems to dominate Patrick Holbrook’s work is his preoccupation with race. Viewing his work, it seems like he may even be exorcising some form of guilt he feels regarding what he refers to as his “whiteness.? This idea of white guilt is especially apparent in his mixed media piece The Ghost Vote.

In the video portion of the installation, Holbrook paints himself with phosphorescent material and walks from his home in Milledgeville, Georgia to the city hall there, poetically casting his “ghost vote.? This act is a means to “exaggerate [his] whiteness in order to deconstruct white supremacist hegemony.? The term “ghost vote,? besides having connotations in this context to the Ku Klux Klan, is also a reference to the practice of rigging elections by placing false votes from people who are dead. Holbrook uses this idea as a metaphor for what he sees as the corruption plaguing the governmental system of today’s America. He tries as hard as he can to alienate himself from this imperialist, racist ideal, but his implementation of himself as the subject of this and other works which deal with race suggests that he still feels a connection to it.
In politically driven art, I have faced the same issue. While much of my work deals with issues concerning my negative views on religion or my observations on the struggle for gay civil rights, I can only delve so far into the conflict before my status as an agnostic, straight white male makes it impossible for me to immerse myself further. No matter how creative and effective the social statements I make may be, I will never know what it’s like to be a homosexual or a woman or a Jew or an African American. So all I can do is play off of who I am.
Holbrook’s negative views toward the governmental structure of which he is a part also have a heavy presence in The Ghost Vote. It seems as though much of his work is actually a series of complaints about the way the United States functions internally and internationally, which isn’t, of course, a bad thing. I think that looking at all of his work at once is actually a hindrance on the overall power of the individual pieces, because I found myself getting bored after looking at his site for awhile. Something about being a guilty white person myself just made it all seem redundant. But, like Holbrook, I’m a bit of a pessimist, so that observation is probably biased somewhat.

Studio E response

My belated tour of Studio E, over there in Rarig Center, was brief but also densely informative and exciting. Colin McFadden, a previous acquaintance, proved an ample tour guide as we braved the jungles of wires and windy hallways of the fifth floor. I was delighted to find out that I could check out a video or still camera any time I like for up to two days, and that I can reserve studio time for ANY reason I like, even if it’s just to learn how to use the equipment. Extraordinary, really.

It’s nice to have such up-to-date resources available for my use as an amateur filmmaker. Not only is the equipment of high quality, but there is also another factor; one that can’t be purchased. We at the University of Minnesota are very lucky to have a resident tech-genius (Colin) at our disposal. I’ve already employed his services in the past in regard to a problem I’d been having with my camera. He emailed me back within a couple of hours with a solution that I could actually comprehend.
I’m not sure what else to say about Studio E or Colin, and I know this response sounds like a review, but it’s what came out of my brain. It is a response in the most literal sense of the term.

Enchanted Response

During my visit to the Enchanted exhibit, I was taken by the variety I found in the art there. The gallery as a whole seemed preoccupied with ideas of visualizations of mental states, such as the familiar Jenny Schmid’s screen prints, all assumably depicting some part of her mind (with herself represented as the skateboarder in each piece. Roxanne Jackson’s “The Devouring Mother? and other related sculptures reach a similar goal, although with much more disturbing results. The piece I was most interested in, however, was Zoe Strecker’s “Pharmaceutical Veil.?

The piece consists of a gauzy black dress, decorated with strings of pill-shaped beads. It’s all symbolic of the façade we take on when we allow ourselves to become dependent upon drugs (in this case, prescription pills). I’m very interested in this sort of thing; drugs, how they interact with the social structure, how we perceive some drugs as opposed to others, etc. I think that some of the message conveyed in this piece finds congress with the themes I tried to lay out in my final project, and being very self-centered, I was immediately drawn to a piece that looked like something I might do. The dress and the beads are all assembled beautifully and carefully, which brings me to another point. This piece also makes a connection between drug culture and fashion culture. And it does so prudently. People lust after the latest clothing trend as rabidly and with as little concern for price as they do for drugs. Although we make fun of drug addicts and models, we tend to hold fashion to a high standard and desirability (as we do with drugs, but secretly). The culture of high fashion is literally infused with drugs, although as is represented cleverly by “Pharmaceutical Veil? the drug problem within high society is often masked with glamour and style.

Flipbook Process

The first thought that ran through my head when I heard the word flipbook, was uh oh, I don't know how to draw. But I decided that that didn't matter, so I just sat down and started to draw something simple.

I thought that since I'm terrified of spiders, I would make a flipbook about a spider. My spider ends up looking more like a tick, the I think the idea gets across. I also originally wanted to have the spider move all over the frame and make an intricate web. But after the first thirty drawings, and the spider still hadn't moved down the frame once, I needed to simplify my idea. So then I thought I'd draw a man that's the same size as the spider and then gets eaten. It's sort of poking fun at what scares me the most. The trickiest thing about drawing the flipbook was getting the images to match up. After scanning the images into the computer, it was also a pain to get them all to line up at the same angles. It was nice using Flash to animate, because I could just type in the same coordinates for each image so they wouldn't jerk from frame to frame. After some trial and error, I managed to make it all work.

Sound Project









Final Project








Final Project








Class Time With Mauricio

I'm so glad that Mauricio was able to come to our class. We were begining our animation projects, and luckily enough, Mauricio is an expert at using Flash.

He was nothing but helpful, and he even stayed past the hour he was scheduled for. He went through some of his projects that he'd finished and some that he was still working on. He showed us the interactive map of the world that he had created using Flash. The colors of the countries would change based upon how often their names were mentioned in the news. He taught us what coding was and what it looked like. The coding that he had created for the map was ridiculously long and complicated. He said it had taken him a long time to figure all of it out. It made me realize that what we were doing was just the tip of the iceberg. Another project he showed us dealt with three people who had been killed in South America. All three of the victims were involved in politics in some way. It was a really nice memorial site. If Mauricio hadn't come to class, I'm not sure I would have been able to get the hang of Flash so quickly. It was great having him in class.

Mauricio Arango + Jamason Chen

MMM_0049.jpg

MMM_0051.jpg

MMM_0053.jpg

Sound Project-Saturday

This sound project is sort of the soundtrack to my Saturday I had last weekend. It was a very interesting, adventurous day with excitement, and ups and downs, so I thought it would be cool to apply music to it. I used GarageBand to create it.

















Flipbook process

As for my flipbook, I once again drew from a character I had
> already established, focusing on movement and aesthetic. I took my
> character, a Japanese gangster (Yakuza) and showed him simply
> smoking, then tossing his cigarette in the air and cutting it in
> half with a sword. I have to say now looking at it that the
> animation was very inspired by Japanese animation mechanisms, such
> as the dramatic wind tussling his hair and clothes and the
> lightening fast cutting motion. I wanted the movements to be very
> concise and profound, so I tried to have only a few elements moving
> at any one time to call attention to them. Creating the smoke and
> dust was particularly fun because added a dynamic sort of dramatic
> punch, I think.

Final Project- Small Scale Life

This is basically my appropriated video with music I created using GarageBand added to it. It is called Small Scale Life.









A boy is building a snowman with his friends and he comes down with a cold. He goes to bed and has dreams of small scale events immediately followed up by parallel, large scale events. He wakes up in the morning, looks out the window to see his snowman, and the audience discovers he is living a rather small scale life himself.

Talking with Jameson

I was so excited to learn that Jameson was going to come back to class to talk. It was great having him around for our discussion of the Documenting China exhibit, and I looked forward to hearing more about his life.

I really enjoyed listening to Jameson talk. He has something to say about everything. I thought it was funny when he started off his hour with "I don't have anything to say." Of course he did, and he did for an hour and a half. He said a lot of interesting things about technology and art, and how they are defined. He likes to ask the question, what is art, and who decides what it is. He thinks that anyone can make art with almost anything. He showed us his blog where he posts all of the photos he takes with his cell phone. He says he's not a professional photographer, but his photos are still art. He said that sometimes it worries him that technology might hurt art, and that it's important to still understand and use methods and equipment that might be considered "old." I absolutely loved this guy, and I hope that I'll be able to hear him speak again.

Holbrook Website response

I took a look at the other collaborative work between Schmidt, Schroeder, and Holbrook (titled The Downfall of Young Girls/Minneapolis) because there was something about "Utopia" that simply didnt sit right with me and left me confuse and longing for more understanding. I was hoping to have this wish for clarity to be fulfilled by watching the other work, but was met with only more confusion. The second work sticks to the "dreamy" non-sensical and imagery-based work of "Utopia," and features confusing images from a girl's head expanding, to a eyes on a water tower. Though the images clearly aim to convey some metaphorical meaning, they are so heavily encrypted that it becomes lost in a wash of confusion. That being said, there is still something captivating about it; a sense of unrest and disturbing imagery that calls for further reflection.

Try 2: Mauricio and Jamason

Mauricio and Jamison were awesome Jamison gave a lot of great
insight to us; I have a lot of respect for him and got a lot from
what he said. He knows a lot about the implication of visual
aesthetics and art in the real world and the power that they pose,
he was really speaking from experience to us. My favorite thing about Jamison is that he understands the relationship between art and the real world
As for Mauricio, his insight was also greatly appreciated, especially for what he offered us as suggestions for starting to study Flash. Mauricio is undoubtedly talented with the program, one needs only to look at his world news project to see that.

Appropriation Project

I call this "Mind, Body, and Soul"...










Visiting Jamason and Mauricio

Mauricio and Jamison were awesome Jamison gave a lot of great
insight to us; I have a lot of respect for him and got a lot from
what he said. He knows a lot about the implication of visual
aesthetics and art in the real world and the power that they pose,
he was really speaking from experience to us. My favorite thing about Jamison is that he understands the relationship between art and the real world
As for Mauricio, his insight was also greatly appreciated, especially for what he offered us as suggestions for starting to study Flash. Mauricio is undoubtedly talented with the program, one needs only to look at his world news project to see that.

Studio E Visit Writing

The trips to Studio E were helpful to me on several different levels, changing with each trip we took to Rarig. The first trip allowed me to get a feel for how digitial work and video/time-based art is created in the real world (or at least Studio E closely resembles how real media creation studios are run). Beyond that however, the project we completed in Studio E allowed me personal growth as an artist, refining my skills and allowing me to try my hand in a venue I was not familiar or comfortable with. Unexpectedly, I have become involved in nearly all the stages of production, from script writing, to directiong, to (eventualy) editing. I am being challenged not only to create a work of art, but to act as a leader in the completion of a project through Studio E; and thats really quite exciting!

Substitute Response 2

In substitution of the Soap Factory exhibit, I found a piece of art from the Museum of Contemporary Art online. The link is:

The piece I chose is called "Jellyfish Eyes" by Takashi Murakami. It was made in 2002 and is a wallpaper exhibit taking up an entire wall in the museum. The piece is basically a pink background with little bubble-eyes that I guess are Jellyfish Eyes. Apparently it is a reflection of the impact of works by Andy Warhol. In all honesty, I truly believe this piece was done simply because it looks cool. It is definitely interesting to look at, but I just don't have the slightest clue how there could be a deeper meaning behind it. I mean, something must have inspired Takashi to do this, but it is way beyond me. The only thing I can come up with is something to do with being watched because the wallpaper is simply thousands of little eyes...some of them opened and some closed. It is really cool to look at, but I think if it were wallpaper in my room, I would get quite a headache.

Substitute Response 1

As a substitute to the Enchanted exhibit, I am going to write about something from a current exhibit at the Weisman Art Museum. It's from the exhibit "Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation." This is an exhibit of contemporary Native North American Art from the West, Northwest, and Pacific. The piece I found especially interesting is called "Khoiye-Goo Mah" by Teri Greeves. You can see it here:

What she did was take glass beads, silver-lined glass beads, commercially manufactured tennis shoes, and create a modern looking shoe with historical Native American symbols on them. They look like the blue, high-top, converse shoes that you would see, but there is much more detail in them. There are images of Native Americans sewn into them along with a hand, which I'm sure is some sort of symbol. I think her message with these shoes is that though the Native Americans may not live like a lot of modern society, they are still changing and advancing with the times. There is a very modern sense about these shoes, along with a very historical and personal meaning to them. I wonder if the blue shoes with red laces symbolize anything with the colors. I found this to be very fascinating.

Edgar Heap of Birds

This artist had a different approach to his art than what I am used to, and he brought to the table very creative techniques of display that were refreshing.

His creation of these pillar-like statues were like nothing I have seen before, and I liked how at first you see these simple bright red, 9 foot tall towering mod structures, but when you walk up to them, these images and words in black writing come into focus, allowing some insight to the mind of the artist. He incorporates a lot of history, especially of Native Americans and the U.S., and also throws a few political loops in there as well. I was especially drawn to the signs he created as art. All of them were posted on public grounds, and each read a different but important message. I liked how these messages were to the point, and made you finally stop dead in your tracks just to read a sign on the street.

Nikki S. Lee

Nikki S. Lee is definitely a superb artist with much ambition as well as an incredible dedication to her art.

She takes herself, erases the slate that is her personality, and paints herself a whole new person based on many stereotypes that float through our society today. The funny thing however is the fact that she was taking these stereotypes and used them in such a way so that she was not insulting, but instead she became intriguing to others. After taking on these characters, Nikki would travel to wherever she needed to go to submerge herself into the culture that is what these stereotypes are based on, and she would do it for an extended period of time (try roughly 3 months 24/7), which shows her level of dedication. Some of these projects she embarked on are:
Hispanic Project
Tourist Project
Young Japanese school girl Project
The Swingers Project
Lesbian Project
Stripper Project
African-American
Business Woman
The Ohio Project

I believe that she is one of the most inspiring artist I have seen lately and it is refreshing to run across someone who is so dedicated to making compelling art and pulls out all of the stop signs to accomplish that.

Jenny Schmid- "Utopia"

For some reason this clip reminds me of something off of the Sci-Fi Channel.

The music was also an interesting part of this animation/clip, it gave the piece more depth, and added a lot to the images as well. It is a fun and playful animation and the fact that some of the things during the clip may not be logical or typical kind of throws your mind into a loop. To me this clip seems to be a little chaotic just because of all of the things I don't understand, and the message isn't clear. I really liked how abstract it was, and the purple bubble taking over the screen at the end was neat and a little different from what you might expect the end to turn into. Overall it was an interesting piece to watch and I got a good deal of entertainment from it.

Jenny Schmid- "Utopia"

For some reason this clip reminds me of something off of the Sci-Fi Channel.

The music was also an interesting part of this animation/clip, it gave the piece more depth, and added a lot to the images as well. It is a fun and playful animation and the fact that some of the things during the clip may not be logical or typical kind of throws your mind into a loop. To me this clip seems to be a little chaotic just because of all of the things I don't understand, and the message isn't clear. I really liked how abstract it was, and the purple bubble taking over the screen at the end was neat and a little different from what you might expect the end to turn into. Overall it was an interesting piece to watch and I got a good deal of entertainment from it.

Documenting China Response

One thing that stood out in this exhibit for me was that when you first walk into the area, you are greeted by these huge photos of people and the interior of their homes, and because they seem so big due to the size of the photograph, it feels as if you were walking into their homes in reality.

It was interesting to see what an average home looks like in a place so far away from us, and it was interesting to compare the similarities and differences. There was a set of pictures to the right side of these larger ones, and these were different. Created by Lui Xiaodi (pieces #1-7), he captured the traditional objects of labor and glorifies the time-honored tradition of working the land by hand. Some of the differences between these images were that the ones by Xiaodi were black and white, small in size, and this time you were walking into the life of farmers in China, not like the other set where you walk into these huge pictures of homes. It's interesting to see what kind of work life many of them have, and those that farm, it was neat to have a visual of what kind of tools and techniques they use to farm versus how we farm in the United States. With the combination of the georgous backgrounds, and the calm feeling that comes from the black and white coloring in these photos, it brings a warm and assuring feeling when you see people living this "simple life" in comparison with ours. As I stand stairing at these photos, I can’t help but to stop comparing our two separate worlds, and start to imagine myself submerged into their world. What would it be like to get rid of my car, electricity, all of the things we take for granted each and every day in the U.S., and back to the way our own civilization used to live (much like they do in these photos of China) before all of these commodities became so excesive?

Patrick Holbrook Response

Patrick Holbrook is a very intriguing artist. All of the different appropriated works that he has created interest me because of how unique and different each one is.

The first clip that I looked at was called “Deep pop song?. While walking down a grocery store aisle full of 2-liter pop jugs, he drags his fingers along the plastic containers, which makes a noise a lot like an instrument like the xylophone. I can’t say that I’m sure the noise was coming from the full pop containers because it sounded a lot like a wooden xylophone, but if it was created from these containers, I’m surprised because I never knew you could do that. What made it even more cool is the fact that there were so many of these containers, causing a multitude of notes as he strolls down two separate sides of the soda aisle. Many of the other pieces he had were a little confusing in the meaning behind them, and were often perceived as weird to me because of not understanding it. His pieces are a combination of pieces that are obvious in meaning, and then there are the others in his collection that make you think until your head hurts. Overall, he has clips that are meant for anyone, and are a lot of fun to watch.

Another response

A new artist that I am able to say, "I love her art!" The reason why, landscape art! She does a lot of landscape art. with Acrylid on canvas. A lot of her are are just "great." Just looking at her art just creates a calm in me. Like have commented on other artist who do landscapes, I really enjoy them. The gallery is located on canada, and I found this artwork from a suggestion from a close friend who know I enjoy this kind of art.

The one I will be speaking about first is about her artwork called "Bend in the River" 2007, Acrylic on canvas. When I saw this artwork I was shocked. I have not seen artwork like this in a long time. For me about a week are so is a realy long time. It is really amazing. It is by a river side and the clouds seem so "fluffy," and it is really hard to get me to say "fluffy." I really like the use of cool colors in the art. Also the reflectoin that is created in the river. At first it look like something from photo shop by just adding a blur. As I stated it really gives me a calm kind of feeling. The use of shade is great. I thought it would be impossible, at least to my own skills. I have very limited art skills but love to look art this kind of artwork. Hopefully I will get to see some more of her artwork in real life.

Enchanted Exhibit

The exhibit, at least to me is as it says and "Enchanted Exhibit." It was very cool. Espically the art that was done on the walls. Though I can not recall the name, I was in rush. For this exhibit I will be talking about a video that was in the exhibit. There was only two but this certain one stood out. Mainly because it made enough noise that I wanted to figure out what the heck it was.

The video was called Catch and Release by Dina Spungin. Before I get to her piece I would like to say that I found some artworks to be very distrubing. Sadly I can not recall the artist name. I took the long way to find the video and was caught but a redish glow. I thought it was something cool that I could write about. I was wrong, though it is art to some people, to me it almost made me throw-up. Mainly because it was a whole group of heads and people or hearts comeing out of thier mouths. They were in red so it made it look like a horror exhibit. Though I mean no offence I am glad it was in the corner of the Exhibit. Back to Dina Spungin, yeah it was really interesting. I have never seen anyone kiss a frog except in cartoons. It was very fun to watch, thought I found it kind of bizarre. Her discription about the connection between her tattoos and the coloring frog was hard to understand. If I ever get the chance I would like to meet her in person to get the answer.

Patrick Holbrook Response

I choose to write my response on the piece called “I Asked 44
People to Draw a Floorplan of Seinfeld's Apartment?, which was collaborated
by Patrick Holbrook in 2000 that consisted of black marker drawings on
white paper. I found this to be a very intriguing piece of work because It
had taken a very popular show, Seinfeld, and asked people to recall what
one of the main character’s living areas looked like that the viewer should
have been very familiar with.
After observing all the of the drawings, it became very apparent
that not everyone had the same visual in their mind of what the apartment
looked like. It was very interesting to see the parallels and commonalties
between all the drawings, and what usually came out differently. For the
majority of the drawings, they included the main couch, a television, and
the idea of the kitchen in the right placement of the apartment. This is
expected since this is the area where the characters in the story spend
most of their time. However, the drawings began to differ wildly when it
came to the less specific areas of the apartment like the bathroom and
bedroom. Also in the area of scale and spacing, nearly all of the drawings
had their own style.
I believe Holbrook put these drawings together because he wanted
to show the difference and variety in how people visualize what they have
seen in the past. Even though it is not said on how familiar each person
was with the show when they created their own drawing, it still pulls off a
great individuality between them and creates an amazing piece to look at.

Studio E

It was a very interesting experience to head to studio E. At first I did not know what to expect because when I was heading to the studio the hallways were very narrow. When I went in it was very big. The crew who introduce it was very lively bunch. Made the complicated stuff seem easy to understand. It could be that because of their liveliness it was very fun. I knew that studio work was very hard but it a lot more difficult then it seems, though the crew there with us said it was easy. I am not convices. It would seem that the crew would have to be very close because it seems that if something was to mess up then there would be fights. At least for me I got a kinda of family vibe from the crew who was teaching us.

Michael Krueger Lecture Response

This year I have been to many different visiting artist lectures, but this is actually one of the artists that really had me glued to my seat.

He was very funny and had me smiling during his whole presentation of his work. Although I wasn’t too fond of his pieces, I really liked his sense of humor along with his personality. Starting off his presentation with items that he collects (such as fruit magnets with faces on them) made his lecture very light and fun. It was amazing the things that he collected and the places where he got some of them. I did admire his pieces where he mirrored an image, putting two halves together to become one. It must be a difficult thing to create art where you have to make dual images that are exactly alike, let alone do it to dozens of images all in one work of art. The detail in his pieces shows his dedication and passion for his work, and it also draws you into his artwork because of so many small but important objects in the picture. I like the different themes he assigned to them too such as two pieces one containing nothing but animals all over the field under the psychedelic sunset, the other replacing the animals with protest signs. His artwork sometimes reminded me of paintings you may see in the hippy era (1960’s & 70’s) because of the bright vibrant colors, the loud style, and even the subjects seem like they involve that era of free love, freedom fighting, and the protest against war.

Mauricio

He was a cool guy to meet. He knew a lot of stuff when it came to flash animation. Also how he learned about flash animation was shocking. If I recall he learned all from a book by himself. It was really shocking, I could not believe how far he go just from learning from a book and a few tutorials from the net. You could really feel his passionfor his work. I have deep respect for anyone like him. He is a very hard worker and gets things done.

Visiting Artists Jamason and Mauricio Response

Jamason and Mauricio were two very interesting artists with interesting pieces of work.

Jamason was very whitty and funny and didn’t showcase his work as much as Mauricio. The pieces that Mauricio showed us really opened my eyes to how much work goes into the technology we use everyday, such as technological programs we use on the computer. I have some background experience with computers and took many courses in high school about the technologies of computers, and I know how to write HTML, but I could never create the programs that Mauricio created. The length and the complexity of the HTML writing blows anything I’ve ever learned out of the water! It was interesting to see what kind of work goes into creating a simple webpage we may go to to navigate us to another, and the complex writing that goes into it shows how talented and dedicated these guys have to be to create art like this.

Studio E Visit Response

The visit to studio E was one of my first times ever being inside of a television studio.

I always imagined what it might be like and in some aspects I was correct, but I never imagined all of the detail that goes into being on television. The smallest things can be some of the most important and critical parts of producing a video project such as lighting and sound. From my point of view, even after watching how to works some things in the studio, I still see the whole experience as overwhelming. I still don’t know how to run the control board, and adjusting the sound in the studio was quite the task as well from what I observed as well. This just shows a great example of how people make their jobs look easy, when in reality, it is a little more complicated than what others may think. I really liked seeing the green screen, I just wish I had gotten a chance to play around with it. It was neat finding out about 3 point lighting and the importance of it, along with learning about the different ways you can play with the type of light you are using (i.e. hard, soft, different color hues, etc.). I learned one thing about the studio and creating a video that turned me off from it, and that was the fact that it takes forever to finish a shoot. There are so many things to take care of, and all of the fine tweeking of light, sound, etc. it takes a very long time to set up the shoot (and it sometimes seems that it takes longer to set up a shoot than it does to tape the actucal footage for the video).

Jamason

He too is a very cool and interesting person. He like to talk a lot and tends to get a little off subject, but he talks about very interesting ideas. He showed clips of when he was in China with a very old camera. He seems to me a very unpredictable person. He is someone who is able to tell at story and everybody will come in and join in, even if they do not know him. He has a aura that just attracts others.

Guest Speaker Responses

Mauricio is a kind gentleman who certainly knows a lot about his field. While I was confused by his teaching of Flash and code, it’s in no way his fault. I’m always confused by those things. I found the work he’s done with Flash intriguing. And it was very nice of him to wait with us in the classroom until Jamason came.

And as for Jamason, I just can’t NOT be endeared by a man whose lecture uses the thesis statement “Maybe you would like to listen to my bullshit.? I found myself agreeing with what he said about the relationship between technology and art, although I don’t think he was sure what he was supposed to lecture us about. In any case, he was nice and informative, which is all I could expect from a good teacher.

Flipbook Process Statement

I’m actually sort of proud of the techniques I used in making this flipbook. My main concern with creating it was visual continuity; that is, I was worried about how successful I would be with creating a convincing illusion of motion. This was the closest thing I’d ever done to animation, and while the results were, in my opinion, less than spectacular, I did learn from it.

To create a rough center for the circle that is the main character (representing the world) in this short vignette, I punctured a small hole in the center of the paper (through several layers so it would be in the same place on each page) and used that as a working point. I proceeded to draw rough, incongruous circles around this organic, pre-human earth. I simply pressed the woodless pencil down hard so the next page would have a visible impression of it, and I could roughly trace it.
Then, when the age of humans began in my little story, the earth had to take on a more artificial feel. Instead of continuing to draw my little worlds freehand, I used a Powerade cap as a stencil to create perfect circles. I was especially proud of this for some reason.
Overall, I’d say making this flipbook was a valuable learning experience, although I wouldn’t exactly say that animation is now my destiny. I think I lack the overall discipline required for such a time and labor-intensive process.

Chambers Hotel Response

This hotel was so full of great art that I feel it would be inadequate to pick one or two pieces to discuss. Instead, I would like to examine the Chambers itself. I've always been a big fan of architecture anyway. The layout of this building is, and had to be, innovative because it suits two uses which are normally very different in appearance. For all the Venuses reclining on their marble fainting couches in museums, you'll seldom find a place to have a rest yourself. Inversely, most hotels don't have a curator keeping a file of all the towels and Comfort Inn stationery. This place must be both an elegant space for displaying art AND a cozy place for throwing away the stresses of the day. How is this achieved?


Well, it's really quite clever. They've divided the hotel into two buildings, with an enclosed, very warm little courtyard in the middle that invites guests and visitors with its beautiful pendant lighting and modern patio furniture, as well as several art pieces scattered about. This space unifies the structure as a whole, as well as providing a common area where one can kick back and enjoy the sounds of the city over a martini.
The transition between art museum and hotel is very smooth, almost nonexistent, and the stress is taken off of the "art museum" end of the spectrum in favor of creating a livable environment. While there is a gallery used only for exhibiting art, many pieces from the permanent collection are actually in the rooms and displayed in the lounge and reception areas. Televisions in the hallway show art films on a loop and the interiors of the rooms are festooned with what I can only assume is expensive furniture and accessories. Indeed, one feels almost encased in a giant piece of ultra-new, metropolitan art, an almost overwhelming sense of modernity hovering in a thick fog all around. A trip to the upstairs lounge takes the patron into a world of George Clooney-esque class and style. The lighting and the seating are all beautifully selected, and the bar is something of a wonder in its resemblance of those well-lit cities made of bottles in the vodka commercials.
This was probably my favorite field trip we've taken this semester, just because it was a place I'd never heard of and because it was full of surprises. I'll always remain a child at heart in the sense that I'm still a sucker for surprises, I guess.

Fresh Works Response

Today when I visited the small but dense Fresh Works Exhibit in the Regis Center, I noted a few things different from what I had seen in other exhibits. First, the increased presence of digital photography. Most modern photographers I have studied have stayed true to the tradition of celluloid and silver gelatin print. But in at least three pieces at this showing I noticed the word "Inkjet" in the media category on the labels, most interestingly so I think in the case of John Mahnke's "Skin Crawl Series." I very much enjoyed Mason Eubanks' work in ink and tinted gesso on shaped canvas and Stacey M. Holloway's "Why Does the Cooped Chicken Dance?: Music Box," but the piece I'd like to focus on here is Jessica Techemyer's "Pink Feathers," a mixed media piece that looms in the far corner of the exhibit.

Techemyer's genius is in her presentation. What the casual observer sees is a large, globular orb huddled against the wall. It's easy to pass this gloss-painted spheroid off as a piece of minimalist art; perhaps an organic homage to Donald Judd. But, looking down at the floor (an act forbidden in some more traditional galleries), we see a pair of red footprints pasted to the concrete directly under the massive red globe. One can only assume that this means the viewer is to stand on these footprints. Looking over at the label, however, there is no reassuring "PLEASE FEEL FREE TO STICK YOUR HEAD INSIDE MY ART" banner across the bottom as there is in "Why Does the Cooped Chicken Dance?". So the now enraptured spectator is torn: commit a possible art gallery faux pas by jumping literally face-first into someone's work, or miss out on the wonders of this magical ball? I chose the former course of action, ducking awkwardly under this contraption clearly designed for someone shorter than myself (probably the artist). The adventurous gallery patron is rewarded, first with a plaster face-mold which I can only assume was made for the piece, and then, upon looking through the eye holes, with a fluffy pink paradise that must resemble remarkably John Waters' version of heaven. The interior is lit very carefully-not oppressively bright, not squintingly dim. One would think this a relatively boring view--simply a puff of feathers--but in fact the opposite is true. Something about it is riveting, almost mesmerizing. Maybe I just have an overdeveloped love for kitsch.
In any case, Techemyer's piece was, to me at least, outstanding (and in a gallery of outstanding work). It's encouraging to know that people are still making art that I like.

SAD Response

At the SAD exhibit, I found many art pieces which were powerful in their own ways, including Charles Matson Lume's "The Still Time" and Lois Borzi's "I'll Call You." But the piece to which I reacted most was Andrea Stanislav's "Flashland" (2007). Her compelling use of combined video and sound design struck me in a way I may find hard to describe. Well, let's give it a shot, anyway.

I've always responded most to multimedia art pieces, and especially to films. The use in Stanislav's case of three video monitors and surround-sound was both unique and very cleverly edited. I can imagine the effort it must have taken to sync up all three screens and the soundtrack.

Of course, it's content I'm more interested in. The installation was filled with images which have haunted me since childhood. The owl, nature's silent and monolithic judge, has always intimidated some part of my soul. This is probably at least partially due to the fact that I saw "The Adventures of Milo and Otis" several dozen times as a youngster. Its reoccurring role in the film and its appearance on all three screens emphasizes its importance to Stanislav's own personal view of darkness. The glassy stare from the jet-black eyes and the decidedly contrasted grays of the feathers create a feeling of bleakness and childish fear. We feel alone, isolated from both the video and the world outside the small box we sit in as participants in this piece.

Undulating mounds of fur form mysterious, fantastic creatures of the imagination. Heaving and rolling, it unmistakably evokes the womb, the place of maternal security and warmth. But at the same time, it is alien, ambiguous of form or identity. And so we are ambivalently drawn to it, both fascinated and put off by its unsure origin. At one point in the film, we are surrounded by the fur, enclosed in its blanket of softness and mammalian familiarity, but at the same time maintaining a small sense of panic at this engulfing force which we are still not able to evaluate as a whole.

Waves of deep, dark water sail in lazily from the infinite horizons of Lake Superior. The image is hazy on purpose, replicating almost exactly the way my memory pictures the view of this vast body of water. At times the water is seen from an upside-down angle, maybe to show us how, from the intangible point of view of the observer, the water and the sky are interchangeable. That is to say, we cannot reach out and tell the difference between one or the other. And so we feel once again alienated from the piece. The wooden structure, comparably tiny in the surf of the great inland sea reminds us of our sheer aloneness, both as self-aware beings and as artificial beings in a world of primal nature.

And of course, the music which Stanislav has selected for this work is of great importance. Usually of simple composition, it nonetheless produces an air of malevolence about the whole experience. At times, it startles the listener by approaching from the rear speakers. Dark, but organic-sounding, the music and sounds we hear are almost natural.

And it all plays in a loop. There's no clear beginning and no clear end, much like a state of mind or a dream, both of which I felt may have been projected in "Flashland." Stanislav's piece is beautiful because one may watch it as many times as he or she pleases. Much like a daydream, the length of the experience is determined by the observer. Sort of a stream-of-consciousness work of art.


SAD Response

Katherine Turczan
Mudman, Hidden Beach, 2004
Silver Gelatin Print

I chose this work because I found this picture very interesting. The man looks sad and lonely. I guess I would be sad and lonely too if I was standing, shirtless, in the woods of Minnesota. It looks like the summer time, so I can only imagine how hot and humid it must be for this guy. He must be getting all bitten up by mosquitos and his feet probably hurt because he's walking around with no shoes on. He looks out of place, like he doesn't belong in his environment. I like how the artist made this photo black and white to diplay the depression and lack of anything exciting in the picture. Had she used colors, it would have been bright and happy-looking. The man's environment has affected him by getting his feet all muddy. This could represent how experiences that we have and other things we surround ourselves with can attach themselves to us and become a part of who we are.

tifafinal.jpg

photoshop sketch.jpg

tifafinal.jpg

photoshop sketch.jpg

SAD response

Katherine Turczan
Mudman, Hidden Beach, 2004
Silver Gelatin Print

I chose this work because I found this picture very interesting. The man
looks sad and lonely. I guess I would be sad and lonely too if I was
standing, shirtless, in the woods...

Katherine Turczan
Mudman, Hidden Beach, 2004
Silver Gelatin Print

I chose this work because I found this picture very interesting. The man
looks sad and lonely. I guess I would be sad and lonely too if I was
standing, shirtless, in the woods of Minnesota. It looks like the summer
time, so I can only imagine how hot and humid it must be for this guy. He
must be getting all bitten up by mosquitos and his feet probably hurt
because he's walking around with no shoes on. He looks out of place, like
he doesn't belong in his environment. I like how the artist made this photo
black and white to diplay the depression and lack of anything exciting in
the picture. Had she used colors, it would have been bright and
happy-looking. The man's environment has affected him by getting his feet
all muddy. This could represent how experiences that we have and other
things we surround ourselves with can attach themselves to us and become a
part of who we are.

Christopher Janney

Christopher Janney presented some of his work at the AIA Minnesota convention in November this year. Trained as an architect and a jazz musician, I couldn’t miss his presentation. His work deals with a lot of interactivity within physical environments. He has done installations in airports, city squares, parking lots, and music festivals. His presentation also included a demonstration of collaboration between him and other jazz musicians where he made projected visuals that interacted with the sound of the musicians. He described the work as an escape from a music video because of the spontaneity of the visuals. He described it as an effort to make music become more physical. He also announced a collaboration with Herbie Hancock to do a similar venture in August 2008.

final and sound project

Media Mill Video









Documenting China

Documenting China Exhibit Response
Rob Lyksett


There are few mediums that have the same power to move and inspire the viewer as much as photography. Almost everyone can relate directly to photography; its power lies particularly in its ability to show parts of the world that would otherwise be difficult to access, showing foreign places, the people who live there, and the human condition in places we would perhaps not see otherwise. Documenting China accomplishes this beautifully, showing a changing world through the eyes of the camera; a world that we can experience through the lens.

Documenting China shows the rapidly changing society in modern China, quickly growing into a heavily industrialized nation and creating an interplay between the “old’ world and the “new? world. China is an important area of the world with a lot of change occurring in the modern day, and exhibits like this allow us to experience the truth of modern Chinese life and almost to become a small part of that change; at least to begin understanding it.
The large photos in the main part of the exhibit, such as those by Jiang Jian, were of particular interest to me. They show, in plain documentary-style photography, the variety of people and change now evident in modern China. For example, photos like Li Shucai, His Wife, and Grandson show an image with motorcycles and a very Western-feeling background. Even with this, images such as the poster of Mao in the background carry implications of the Eastern world as well. In Zhing Qunzi and Her Two Daughters we are given an image of a very different China, one that is smaller and rural with a very agrarian background. Even here, evidence of western mentality is still pervasive, particularly in the Christian calendars covering the walls. Through evidence from these photographs, the influence of western culture seems to be growing very strong in China. Photos like Li Qiaohui and His Wife and Untitled no.5, Untitled no.7(I’m afraid I did not record the name of the photographer) show a China that is peppered with Caucasian models, proving yet another infusion of Western and Eastern culture.
This is an excellent exhibit because of its cultural effects; it allows us to see a part of the world and expose things that many of us, as Americans, may not ever see in person. This is the importance of photography.

Final Project

SAD gallery response

Robert Lyksett
ARTS 1601
9/11/07

Reflection of SAD Artwork
Robert K Lyksett


When trying to choose a piece to write about, I quickly gravitated toward the video work on the far wall in the first part of the gallery. “Endless Day? by Jan Estep is a “Time Lapse Digital Video,? a work of art utilizing a digital medium to present itself. “Endless Day? however, has one vital difference that finally made me choose it above all the other pieces in the gallery; it’s letting the visual speak for itself. While the other pieces in the SAD gallery utilize very specific audio or text to convey a specific idea to the viewer (such as the giant pincushion spewing out “empty condolences? as the artist wants to use to instill a hopeless emotion in the viewer), “Endless Day? has neither. Instead, Estep’s video lets the viewer draw their own conclusions completely, using no editing, sound, text, or other narrative devices to form the opinion/emotional response of the viewer.


Without these artificial devices, Estep’s work actually is more inspirational than any of the other pieces in the gallery. While every artist featured in this gallery was trying to capture the essence of particular environments and atmospheres and their effect on humans, Estep was the only artist who allowed that environment (and consequently, her visual work) to speak for itself. The Weisman description of the show describes the art of SAD as addressing “a sense of place focused not on land, but on the qualities of light and atmosphere, and the sense of time to which these elements relate.? “Endless Day? fits this description perfectly, particularly because the light is the most powerful element of the entire piece. Indeed, the light of the sun becomes the defining feature of the artwork, acting not only as the focal point, but also as the device to reveal the entire image (such as when the water shimmers as the sun passes over it, revealing the terrain to be an ocean). “Endless Day? offers an excellent way to study the light qualities of the sun, such as the way the beam of light is reflected on the water, lying in an intense, parallel beam across the ocean surface. Five other straight beams of light shine from the sun and remain stationary throughout its entire revolution.
The revolution of the sun in this piece is one of the most important things the artist wanted to show in this piece; or rather, Ester wanted to show the lack of conventional solar revolutions. The sun does not really “rise? or “set? in the entire time lapse of “Endless Day? but rather, it moves across the screen in a horizontal line (not the arc we are so used to). This video was taken high in the Northern Hemisphere, allowing the camera to show solar activity that cannot be seen anywhere else, such as the 24 hours of sunlight that give this piece its name and focal point. However, a sense of revolving and change in time can still be discerned from this video without the traditional arc of the sun; the lens flare has a definite arc (steadily moving from the right hand to the left hand side of the screen), as well as several movements in the piece that give a sense of changing time. For example, the clouds move steadily from the left side of the screen until they are met by a massive storm front from the top of the screen that intercepts the other clouds and creates a blackened sky that lasts until the end of the film.
Knowing all of these things and seeing their movement, we presume that we can get a sense of where the place is, what we are viewing, and get out bearings. Interestingly, this proves a difficulty. One could assume that at least one set of the clouds and fronts are moving from southwest to northeast, as most fronts do, but this would mean that the Sun is moving from the West to the East as well (the opposite of what it really does). So one of the theories must be incorrect. The more thought we give it, the more confusing it becomes, and this is what is so interesting about this piece. “Endless Day? treats the viewer to a confusing and amazing natural spectacle through the use of strong light and movement, making it one of the most effective and impressive pieces in the Weisman’s exhibit.

September 9, 2007

Walker Art Center

Students in ARTS 1601 Visit the Walker Art Center on Thursday, September 13, 2007

Tiara Carlson

The exhibit that struck me the most was titled Shotgun Landscape. It was created by Chris Larson in 2007 using HDV, with a running time of about 15 minutes. I unintentionally caught the end of the film first, which was just a video image of a rural Minnesotan landscape.

It instantly triggered memories of me as a young girl on the farm I grew up on up north. Tall, dry, light-brown grasses covered the ground as far as the eye could see. The sky was an intense grey-blue without a cloud in the sky (which also happens to be the color of my room at home, hmmm….). And just as I was beginning to notice even more details, the film ended and started over. I took a seat and decided to watch it from the beginning.
Shotgun Landscape begins with blackness. The blackness is actually the painted side of a wall made from plywood for the film. After a few seconds of black a hole appears in the center of the black wall. It appears quickly and seemingly from out of nowhere, and it suddenly makes sense as to why it’s titled Shotgun Landscape. For every hole created by the shotgun another piece of the landscape appears. By the end of the film every visible inch of the black wall is gone, and the landscape is in it’s entirety.
I was intrigued by the idea of a shotgun being used to created something beautiful, which I think alludes to the fact that Minnesota can be beautiful and dangerous at the same time. It can also be tied into the fact that hunting is a widely practiced activity in Minnesota, it’s almost as if the shotgun is responsible for the landscape that appears on the video. The rough edges of the holes add a sort of rustic quality to the video, and eventually start to “frame? the landscape.
The landscape that’s recorded gives off a strong sense of isolation- there’s no buildings, people, or even any animals in the video. The trees in the foreground appear to be dead- they don’t have any leaves, and the only patch of green is on the ground running from the bottom right of the video to the left. It’s easy to see how a place like the one in the video could drive someone mad. Nothing changes in the 15 minutes of the video. The only movement is that of the trees and the grass swaying as a continual breeze blows by. The light doesn’t change, and there are no shadows to speak of. It almost seems as if time has stopped.
It also reminds me of how small my world felt when I used to live up north. Most people don’t tend to think about what’s beyond the closest town, or that it’s even possible to get there and explore for yourself. Shotgun Landscape narrowed my vision to only what was caught on the video, what I was seeing was what’s important and nothing else.

Appropriated Film

Media Mill Video









Final Project









Final Project









Appropriated Film

Erich Welton

I choose the piece by Andrea Stanislav titled Flashland. This was a film with audio. It was set up in a small dark room with a TV in front of you and two side TVs not to be viewed directly but rather through your peripheral vision. There were small speakers around the room providing you with a good sound quality.

What first drew me towards this work was the eeriness of it. The sounds that were coming from the room were odd and but yet soothing. I did not read the information plate on the wall outside the room but understood that I was supposed to look straight head. When I first sat down, the image was of a woman flipping her hair around. Behind her was a circle that looked like it was used for mathematical purposes. The audio was a smooth ambient sound that made me fall into a trance. This made is very easy to stay with anticipation of what was to come next.

In addiction to the woman flipping her hair around, there were made different and unique clips. There was also in owl that sat very still, staring at you. There was water and at some points with a small building in it. After viewing this for a short while it would flip upside down. There was a woman, possibly the same one as before, with white contact in. This was the one clip that kind of freaked me out. Each of these clips was paired with audio that seemed appropriate to the images.

While I was watching this film, it started reminding me of the video from The Ring. Much like the video in this movie, Stanislav’s film was made up of a string of short clips to make of a whole piece. The film began to flop so I got up to look around some more but then it made me wonder; where did I start watching the film? I could have by accident sat down to watch at the beginning or perhaps I sat down half way through. It kind of bother me not know when I started watching. I also thought what it would have been like if I just watched it from start to finish once through.

Brice Aarrestad

Chris Larson’s Shotgun Landscape was very intriguing to me because it delineates time in an interesting way. Larson took a large black panel of wood and set it up in a rural Minnesota landscape. He then shot the panel with 12 gauge shotguns 376 times. Larson’s instillation is composed of three parts, a projected film, a series of photographs and the large wooden panel that he shot through. I was fortunate enough to experience the instillation in what I perceive was a backwards order. I started with the series of photographs then moved to the panel and finally saw the film.

I quickly recognized the photos as a continuous landscape viewed through holes created by a shotgun. This series first brought my attention to the delineation of time recalling another artist, David Hockney, who successfully used photography to explore time in a new way through photo collages. The holes made from the shotgun slowly reveal the landscape in much the same way. If only one of the photos was viewed without the context of the others it would only achieve mediocrity as an interesting landscape study. However, when viewed together they activate the landscape through time and achieve a depth of animated exploration.

The wooden panel was the next element I viewed. The panel is the most important element of the installation because it served as the canvas for the painting - its demise revealing the finished landscape. Christopher Larson could have easily left the panel in the rural field or thrown it away in a dumpster but it’s inclusion in the installation brings a necessary element of scale within the photographs but also the scale of the framed landscape. It serves as tangible evidence of the 376 shotgun blasts and the tactile materiality of the work.

Finally, the film element views the entire process of the work- all 15 minutes necessary to expose the landscape. The interesting and somewhat fresh idea with the film is that nothing was left on the cutting room floor. It is a continuous shot bringing the tactile materiality of the panel into a new understanding of how it became that way. This too highlights the delineation of time. So much of what we view and read and listen to has been edited down, cropped and spliced to a concise set of ideas that the element of time is underappreciated. Our culture is increasingly reliant on efficiency and conserved time. There are moments in the film when no shots are fired for mysterious reasons (maybe reloading shells or checking the camera equipment) these moments of anticipation are luxuries of experiencing the artist working rather than the artist’s work. The use of a shotgun is also an interesting use of time because the disappearance of material is immediate. This brings an element of stop motion- almost still photography- into the continuous film, which is seemingly the reverse of the photographic sequence. It would be completely different if the artist used small sheet of paper and poked the holes with pins.

Philip James Hart

At the SAD exhibit, I found many art pieces which were powerful in their own ways, including Charles Matson Lume's "The Still Time" and Lois Borzi's "I'll Call You." But the piece to which I reacted most was Andrea Stanislav's "Flashland" (2007). Her compelling use of combined video and sound design struck me in a way I may find hard to describe. Well, let's give it a shot, anyway.

I've always responded most to multimedia art pieces, and especially to films. The use in Stanislav's case of three video monitors and surround-sound was both unique and very cleverly edited. I can imagine the effort it must have taken to sync up all three screens and the soundtrack.

Of course, it's content I'm more interested in. The installation was filled with images which have haunted me since childhood. The owl, nature's silent and monolithic judge, has always intimidated some part of my soul. This is probably at least partially due to the fact that I saw "The Adventures of Milo and Otis" several dozen times as a youngster. Its reoccurring role in the film and its appearance on all three screens emphasizes its importance to Stanislav's own personal view of darkness. The glassy stare from the jet-black eyes and the decidedly contrasted grays of the feathers create a feeling of bleakness and childish fear. We feel alone, isolated from both the video and the world outside the small box we sit in as participants in this piece.

Undulating mounds of fur form mysterious, fantastic creatures of the imagination. Heaving and rolling, it unmistakably evokes the womb, the place of maternal security and warmth. But at the same time, it is alien, ambiguous of form or identity. And so we are ambivalently drawn to it, both fascinated and put off by its unsure origin. At one point in the film, we are surrounded by the fur, enclosed in its blanket of softness and mammalian familiarity, but at the same time maintaining a small sense of panic at this engulfing force which we are still not able to evaluate as a whole.

Waves of deep, dark water sail in lazily from the infinite horizons of Lake Superior. The image is hazy on purpose, replicating almost exactly the way my memory pictures the view of this vast body of water. At times the water is seen from an upside-down angle, maybe to show us how, from the intangible point of view of the observer, the water and the sky are interchangeable. That is to say, we cannot reach out and tell the difference between one or the other. And so we feel once again alienated from the piece. The wooden structure, comparably tiny in the surf of the great inland sea reminds us of our sheer aloneness, both as self-aware beings and as artificial beings in a world of primal nature.

And of course, the music which Stanislav has selected for this work is of great importance. Usually of simple composition, it nonetheless produces an air of malevolence about the whole experience. At times, it startles the listener by approaching from the rear speakers. Dark, but organic-sounding, the music and sounds we hear are almost natural.

And it all plays in a loop. There's no clear beginning and no clear end, much like a state of mind or a dream, both of which I felt may have been projected in "Flashland." Stanislav's piece is beautiful because one may watch it as many times as he or she pleases. Much like a daydream, the length of the experience is determined by the observer. Sort of a stream-of-consciousness work of art.

Lydia Schlicht

The artwork “It’s Still Time? made in 2007 by Charles Lume proved to be a moving piece as it leads individuals to enter or exit the SAD exhibit in the Weisman Museum. Lume utilized the effect of lights and shadows, along with fiber optics, mirrors, icicle ornaments, straws and paper umbrellas in order to depict his ideas surrounding the winter and summer solstices on three large walls–two winter, one summer.

A brief glance at the walls themselves notices the artist’s conception of space. Using the walls themselves, Lume created a unique spacial relationship; a wide hallway, the area through which to enter and exit the exhibit, separates the summer piece from the winter piece (#1). Winter piece (#2) hides on the opposite side of the same wall as the summer piece. By arranging the pieces this
way, Lume removed all sense of flow between the walls. It describes exactly how opposing and separate the winter and summer seasons may be perceived by individuals, especially those diagnosed with SAD. The separation of the pieces quietly portrays ideas that, during the winter months, specific
emotions (happiness, excitement, joy, etcetera) are as unobtainable and unreachable as summer seems.

Moving past the spacial relationship, the individual pieces use simplistic elements of art to create detailed images of beauty and mystery. In the summer piece, the artist chose straws and paper umbrellas to create a trough, like a smile of intense color. Light sources from above shine onto the color creating shadows of darker color. The arc sits at the top of the wall where people must lift their eyes towards the ceiling in order to see the circular shapes and bright design. Because of the overall intensity of the light/colors, the use of summer objects (paper umbrellas and straws) and the act of looking up, the piece provokes a sense of uplifting happiness. Contrasting to that, in arcs (inverted troughs), both winter pieces incorporate small mirrors lying on the floor and the use of soft light and shadow, exempt of color, which evoke feelings of beauty yet boredom, mystery yet sadness or coldness.

Relating to the climate of the Midwest where winter lingers, sometimes dragging its chilled feet, culture responds much like Lume’s winter pieces. Men and women alike cover their colorful clothes with coats of duller colors, skin pales as the months go on and due to the shortened daylight, many spend less time out and about. White snow covers green grass and gray clouds hide the blue skies producing a monochrome scheme of values. By seeing these changes, Charles Lume took to heart the effect of color on emotions and how nature, through its changing seasons and thus color-schemes, alters perception.

Personally, I chose this artwork due to the beauty of its details and the similarity of my thoughts to the artist's of ideas. I feel that Lume expertly applies simple principals and elements of art. Value, line, shape, space and color combine to form pieces that are truly moving in my mind. As the artwork that fills the entrance and exit to the exhibit, it helped me to reflect upon how I view topics such as SAD before and after I investigate more deeply. Just as the summer and winters are different and separate, so too my thoughts are different and separate from what they were before and after I saw the exhibit. “It’s Still Time? continues to affect individuals including myself in weeks after viewing. It masterfully displays summer and winter solstices in simplistic beauty while growing understanding and awareness about SAD.

SAD Wiseman Exhibits

The painting that caught my eyes the most at the Wiseman exhibits was the painting of the chickens. The chicken painting was painted by an American artist call Doug Argue.

Argue didn’t have a name for the painting so it remain untitled. He painted the chicken painting on a canvas with oil paint in 1991-93. The reason why I think this painting is catchy the most was because of its sizes. Like the summary of the painting stated that the painting was painted as a life size painting making one feel like they’re part of the painting; that is why it stands out so much comparing with the other art works. While reading the summary it was stated about how Argue painted the feather, beak, crown, and the wire cage very well, making it seem like he wanted the viewer to pay close attention to those object while he painted the chicken very sketchy. When I read up to this part of the summary it made me wonder why this painting fit with the theme SAD. But after thinking it more carefully I finally figure out why the painting fit with the theme SAD. The reason why I think it fit into the theme SAD was because the artist wants to point out to the viewer by saying that when one is lock up in a wire cage they feel like they are nothing just like how the artist drew the chicken, very sketchy, symbolizing that they aren’t important that why are all out of focus. The reason why the wire cage, crown, beak and feather are more in detail is because those objects symbolize something also. Like the wire cage symbolize the bars in a jail cell. The bars in the jail cell is what’s locking the jail mate from the outside world, just like how the chicken is lock up in the wire cage who being locked out from the wilderness. The feather symbolize the uniform they have to wear when they are locked up, just like when a person is locked up in jail cell where they have to wear an orange uniform; but for the chicken they are wearing feathers. Then the crown and the beak symbolize the health and the food. The crown shows how healthy a chicken is, and when a person is in jail they have to be keep healthy. The beak is symbolized as food because a chicken eats from its beak while a human eats from its mouth. Stating that since both a chicken and a person who is in jail/cage have to eat, they have to get there food by others. Just like when the humans feed the chicken when they are hungry and how people in jail have meals time. Also since the painting is a big painting of a lot of chicken inside a cage, it can make one see that they’re standing in a hall of a jail cell. This is why I think that the painting fit in with the theme SAD. It’s also because it symbolizing how a person feels when they are locked up in jail/cage.

Aaron Troe

Katherine Turczan
Mudman, Hidden Beach, 2004
Silver Gelatin Print

I chose this work because I found this picture very interesting. The man
looks sad and lonely. I guess I would be sad and lonely too if I was
standing, shirtless, in the woods...

Katherine Turczan
Mudman, Hidden Beach, 2004
Silver Gelatin Print

I chose this work because I found this picture very interesting. The man
looks sad and lonely. I guess I would be sad and lonely too if I was
standing, shirtless, in the woods of Minnesota. It looks like the summer
time, so I can only imagine how hot and humid it must be for this guy. He
must be getting all bitten up by mosquitos and his feet probably hurt
because he's walking around with no shoes on. He looks out of place, like
he doesn't belong in his environment. I like how the artist made this photo
black and white to diplay the depression and lack of anything exciting in
the picture. Had she used colors, it would have been bright and
happy-looking. The man's environment has affected him by getting his feet
all muddy. This could represent how experiences that we have and other
things we surround ourselves with can attach themselves to us and become a
part of who we are.

SAD response

The artwork that I have chosen from SAD was a piece called, “Endless day (2006)? by Jan Estep. The artwork itself is a time-lapse digital video lent by the artist with a total of 5 minutes. The location of the piece is a sunset scene in North Atlantic.

This artwork drew my eyes because I have a deep interest in landscape art. To me landscape can give a certain feeling that calms me and is very hard for me the draw. Also what caught my eyes was how Estep was able to capture the lighting of the sun as clouds pass by. While reading the description of the piece I was thinking of the title of the exhibit, SAD and the title of the artwork itself, Endless Day. It kept me thinking what about an endless day? What makes it SAD? It took SAD as it literal meaning and thought about the scene. It was scenery that was untouched bathed in the light of the sunset. It made me think that it most is lonely. The scene gained nothing but lost nothing, make it truly isolation. To me that am what I think the artwork was named Endless Day.

The way the work relates to the exhibit itself is the use of light. The shades and hues of the scene itself. It basically had dark cool colors with the sunset and its rays to keep the eyes moving. Also it ties to the exhibit of SAD is that it is a scene of the ocean. And it is my guess but I believe it gets really cold at that time. I see the work SAD deals with cold and dark thoughts. That is why the scene caught my eyes rather then the others, because of how I associate sad with myself. The issue of light in the art is that the source is the sunset. It doesn’t give much light but enough to light the ocean and the clouds to create different kinds of hues. Also because it was time-lapse digital video the lighting didn’t stay in one place it kept changing the light of the clouds and the sea. The way the artwork ties with isolation is that it the scene is untouched. There is nothing in the scene that is not there to begin with. No people, and animals seen, it is as if there was nothing there that could change the mood of the scene. With sadness-key elements I believe that the artwork is portraying it just fine. The sad element is that the artwork is showing is that the mood of the scene of endless just like how the title says. It is also back up with the colors of blues and grays. And it has the sunset to bounce of the cool colors to change the blues and grays. But it has enough of dark colors to keep the colors cool instead of hot colors.

Amy Marron

It’ Sad When You Shoot A Chalkboard

At first glance Chris Larson’s Shotgun Chalkboard Landscape reminded me of
the video Jeremy’s Song by Pearl Jam. The kid in the video shot up the
class and I am sure he hit the chalkboard as well. Then I started to think
about other recent school shootings such as Columbine and Virginia Tech.

Chris Larson’s art description said a 12 gauge shotgun was used to shoot
the board 376 times creating a huge hole. Just a little excessive don’t you
think. Just as the shootings in the school cases were excessive acts.
Excessive also is the size of this peace of work.

A large black rectangle border that is two and a half feet thick and
stretches about fifteen feet wide and ten feet tall, hangs massively on the
gallery wall. The inside of the jagged border is where the gun shots
exploded pieces of the chalkboard away leaving a large hole in the center.
The fact that the hole is simply the wall showing through, produces a
feeling of nothingness while viewing. At initial inspection more attention
is paid to the interesting shapes that the bullets created in the black
board. After all the whole is just the gallery wall it’s not a piece of the
art. Or is it?
At first I thought what’s the point made by shooting a big hole of
nothingness in a chalkboard, other than just to make viewers remember the
school shootings? Now I think the hole has more significance. We all know
now that the school shooters had something missing in their lives like
uninvolved parents or a lack of confidence to deal with preppy assholes in
a less permanent way. That can lead to feelings like a giant hole of
nothingness. Many people create what is missing in their lives, they say it
can be therapeutic. The missing gun hole in the art corresponds to the
school shooters who created many holes with guns. I wonder if they got any
short lived therapy out of their holes.
an older student

Vang Moua

The artwork that I have chosen from SAD I apiece called, “Endless day (2006)? by Jan Estep. The artwork itself is a time-lapse digital video lent by the artist with a total of 5 minutes. The location of the piece is a sunset scene in North Atlantic.

This artwork drew my eyes because I have a deep interest in landscape art. To me landscape can give a certain feeling that calms me and is very hard for me the draw. Also what caught my eyes was how Estep was able to capture the lighting of the sun as clouds pass by. While reading the description of the piece I was thinking of the title of the exhibit, SAD and the title of the artwork itself, Endless Day. It kept me thinking what about an endless day? What makes it SAD? It took SAD as it literal meaning and thought about the scene. It was scenery that was untouched bathed in the light of the sunset. It made me think that it most is lonely. The scene gained nothing but lost nothing, make it truly isolation. To me that am what I think the artwork was named Endless Day.
The way the work relates to the exhibit itself is the use of light. The shades and hues of the scene itself. It basically had dark cool colors with the sunset and its rays to keep the eyes moving. Also it ties to the exhibit of SAD is that it is a scene of the ocean. And it is my guess but I believe it gets really cold at that time. I see the work SAD deals with cold and dark thoughts. That is why the scene caught my eyes rather then the others, because of how I associate sad with myself. The issue of light in the art is that the source is the sunset. It doesn’t give much light but enough to light the ocean and the clouds to create different kinds of hues. Also because it was time-lapse digital video the lighting didn’t stay in one place it kept changing the light of the clouds and the sea. The way the artwork ties with isolation is that it the scene is untouched. There is nothing in the scene that is not there to begin with. No people, and animals seen, it is as if there was nothing there that could change the mood of the scene. With sadness-key elements I believe that the artwork is portraying it just fine. The sad element is that the artwork is showing is that the mood of the scene of endless just like how the title says. It is also back up with the colors of blues and grays. And it has the sunset to bounce of the cool colors to change the blues and grays. But it has enough of dark colors to keep the colors cool instead of hot colors.

Kurtis Melby

I chose "The Still Time" which was made by Charles Matson Lume in 2007. I picked this one because it grabbed my attention immediately when I walked into the museum. It consisted of dozens of small round mirrors on the ground, and a bright light shining down on them at an angle to create a light pattern on the wall.

The mirrors were arranged in an arc which starts skinny, get fatter at the middle, and then skinny again at the end. There are also pieces of fiber optics on the wall, which when caught be the reflected light, seemed to glow. I liked this piece because of the way the light looked on the wall, it created a very cool visual effect. Also I like things made of simple shapes and plain backgrounds.

When I read the plaque on the wall about the piece I realized that this was only a third of the entire work of art. On the wall opposite what I initially saw there was another arc, this one was not near the floor but up about 8 feet in the air. The arc was made up of brightly colored straws and flowery drink parasols. On the other side of the wall the colorful arc was on was another arc. This one was much like the first one except that instead of the fiber optics, the wall was covered with plastic glow-in-the-dark icicles.

These three arcs represent different seasons of the Midwest. The two with the mirrors on the ground create a very cold light arc which shows the sunlight during the winters. It shows the limited light during the winter and the lack of visual variation(no color, stark landscapes). The winter arc with the plastic icicles is reminiscent of a blizzard or just snow in general. The mirrors themselves reflect white light which looks similar to the reflection of the sun off a fresh layer of snow. Both of these create a feeling of loneness and isolation by the show the monotony and lack of change throughout all winters.

Sandwiched between these two oppressive seasons is the savior: summer. This arc is opposite in nearly every way possible two the other two arcs. It is up high, bright and colorful, as if looking up into the sun on a hot day. The warm colors make just looking at it feel good. Also the floral pattern on the parasols remind me of the flourishing plants in the summer. Also the materials themselves, the colorful straws, are something only used when drinking something fun and refreshing. This euphoric summer seems fleeting because of its placement between two cold winters. As if most of the time it is something yearned for but not there.

Sean Kapisak

The piece of work that I chose to write about and observe was created by Charles Matson Lume in 2007. It is called "The Still Time" and is an installation. It is the first piece of work that I saw in the exhibit and it covers three walls. I choose this work for a multitude of reasons but first I wanted to explain my first observations while looking at the work and describe how it looked to me.

On the left wall positioned on the floor connecting to the ground is one of the arcs that represent a winter solstice. There are many mirrors placed on the ground in a very slim arc close to the wall that reflect light onto the wall. This produces a scatter of circles and ovals on the wall of many shapes and sizes. The arc on the wall is not very sharp but is quite elongated. Fiber optics are also used to outline the shape of the arc. All these together produce a very bright and magical looking piece of work.
On the right wall is the largest arc of the three. It is quite different from the others in the fact that it is much higher up and arc is pointed down towards the floor, while the others pointed towards the ceiling. Drink parasols, drinking straws, and drink straws with parasols with a variety of colors - blue, yellow, red, green, and orange - are used to create this work. Some of the parasols are sticking farther out than others. As well, some of the parasol umbrellas are inverted. The straw tips are pointed in a variety of directions. This gives the piece of work a much more multi-dimensional feel and appearance.
Around the corner on the opposite side of the summer arc is the third arc which represents a winter solstice as well. It is created with glow-in-the-dark icicle ornaments and mirrors. The same lighting effect is used with the mirrors on the floor to bounce light onto the wall. This arc is slightly larger than the other winter arc. The icicle ornaments give the representation of the sun its shape and wild surface appearance. It is much more visible than the other winter solstice arc but still gives the same white and magical appearance.
The reason I chose this work is because I feel that it does a good job representing SAD. It was stated that: “SAD addresses a sense of place focused not on land, but on the qualities of light and atmosphere, and the sense of time to which those elements relate.? I think Lume does a great job expressing this through a vision of Minnesota’s landscape of summer and winter. Through the three walls, Lume has the summer squished in between the two winters. From our craving for summer, Lume puts the summer arc high above on top of the middle wall out of reach. He uses vibrant colors to catch our eye and attention and creates an object for our desire. While the winter representations still give us light, its not as colorful and spectacular. I believe he places them on the ground near the floor to represent our easy access to it and the fact that the people of Minnesota are accustomed to our winter. I also believe that the winter arcs are smaller than the summer arc because of the solstice the day is shorter in the winter than in the summer. All of this together provides an impressive piece of work that I believe achieves what it was meant to represent.

Liberty and Freedom

This video examines the relationship between feminism, freedom and the American lifestyle. More specifically it questions the motives behind feminism: is it seeking equal rights for women? or for authority over men? To me, it is the latter. After research and reflection, I think that women having more authority than men has the opposite effect than it aims for; rather than having more freedom, women are mentally, emotionally and spiritually more oppressed. Although the American society often objectifies women, this work suggests the disconnect between improving the situation and this type of feminist movement.
(This is a continuation of my Appropriated Film Project. Audio has been added.)









Documenting China Response

Utopia in Progress by Jenny Schmid is a very fun and playful animation film. It starts with a girl floating in on a ship that takes off into the sky. It then cuts to a boy wandering around with a mystical butterfly following close behind him. Out of nowhere, a UFO swoops down and picks him up. The girl then reappears, floating down from the sky with a parachute and lands on a skateboard. She then rides away and passes the boy, knocking books out of his hands. One of the books opens to a man dressed in a bear costume and that is dancing. The girl rides in on a comet and starts rocking out on the drums. Purple bubbles come out of the drum set to fill the screen to end the film. This film does not seem to make a whole lot of sense but is captivating and keeps your attention through the entire thing. It makes the view sit with anticipation, wondering what is going to happen next. The characters in the film are very stereotypical to all of her works. She also creates a great sense of motion even with just cut-out figures.

In Class Lectures

We had two in class lectures from practicing electronic artists

Maricio’s project on the amount of media coverage of countries around the world is an interesting way of representing the “Popular Kids.? The dimming countries are the ones that have not been mentioned in recent news stories and those who are mentioned the most are increasingly darker.

Jamason posed the question a banker’s work isn’t art so why would someone who types on a computer be an artist. The notion of electronic art’s acceptance as a viable art form is slowly progressing. He discussed mobile media digital photography and the importance of content.

Sad Response

Chris Larson’s Shotgun Landscape was very intriguing to me because it delineates time in an interesting way. Larson took a large black panel of wood and set it up in a rural Minnesota landscape. He then shot the panel with 12 gauge shotguns 376 times. Larson’s instillation is composed of three parts, a projected film, a series of photographs and the large wooden panel that he shot through. I was fortunate enough to experience the instillation in what I perceive was a backwards order. I started with the series of photographs then moved to the panel and finally saw the film.

I quickly recognized the photos as a continuous landscape viewed through holes created by a shotgun. This series first brought my attention to the delineation of time recalling another artist, David Hockney, who successfully used photography to explore time in a new way through photo collages. The holes made from the shotgun slowly reveal the landscape in much the same way. If only one of the photos was viewed without the context of the others it would only achieve mediocrity as an interesting landscape study. However, when viewed together they activate the landscape through time and achieve a depth of animated exploration.

The wooden panel was the next element I viewed. The panel is the most important element of the installation because it served as the canvas for the painting - its demise revealing the finished landscape. Christopher Larson could have easily left the panel in the rural field or thrown it away in a dumpster but it’s inclusion in the installation brings a necessary element of scale within the photographs but also the scale of the framed landscape. It serves as tangible evidence of the 376 shotgun blasts and the tactile materiality of the work.

Finally, the film element views the entire process of the work- all 15 minutes necessary to expose the landscape. The interesting and somewhat fresh idea with the film is that nothing was left on the cutting room floor. It is a continuous shot bringing the tactile materiality of the panel into a new understanding of how it became that way. This too highlights the delineation of time. So much of what we view and read and listen to has been edited down, cropped and spliced to a concise set of ideas that the element of time is underappreciated. Our culture is increasingly reliant on efficiency and conserved time. There are moments in the film when no shots are fired for mysterious reasons (maybe reloading shells or checking the camera equipment) these moments of anticipation are luxuries of experiencing the artist working rather than the artist’s work. The use of a shotgun is also an interesting use of time because the disappearance of material is immediate. This brings an element of stop motion- almost still photography- into the continuous film, which is seemingly the reverse of the photographic sequence. It would be completely different if the artist used small sheet of paper and poked the holes with pins.

Another interesting exploration would be to see the film in reverse as the landscape is concealed with pieces of black wood falling perfectly into place.

Pencil Animation

Media Mill Video









Pencil Animation

Media Mill Video









Utopia

Utopia in progress by Jenny Schmid is a good exploration of animation and the ability of programs like flash to produce those animations. The plotline seems to be a secondary focus because it is rough and undeveloped. The transitions between the scenes are a little disturbing because there is little continuity in the plot. My favorite part happens when the girl is riding on her skateboard and the camera zooms in to a headshot of her. The motion of the background and her ponytails waving in the wind are in conflict with the lack of expression in her face. That moment is a little unsettling but it creates an interesting narrative of boredom in the midst of UFO’s and flying pirate ships.

Students at "SAD" exhibiton Weisman Art Museum

Students in ARTS 1601 Visit the Walker Art Center on Thursday, September 6, 2007

http://www.weisman.umn.edu/exhibits/SAD/home.html

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Sound Project

A Piano Story









Final Project

I chose to do another Appropriation project for my final project.










Festival of Appropriation Response

BA/BFA Response

For the Good of the Colony by Kris Shideman is a very interesting piece. I was able to see him work and create this piece of art. This was his first screen and it turned out great. It is very technical in terms of registration but he was able to succeed in this area. The colors are what quite possible make it so attractive. The bees are not shaded in their typical colors at all. They are made up of vibrant greens and pinks. Also, the two bees in the center appear much larger than the rest. This could be seen as distracting if they were not illustrated in a different manner. His unique depiction he a bee is both abstract and realistic. Another thing that makes this print so startling is the gold background. He also put a lot of thought into this having the potential of being too distracting. He ended up adding yellow to the gold to dull it down as well as taking out some of the honey combs out. All in all, this is a very appealing screen print done very successfully.

Michael Krueger Response (extra credit)

Our class was lucky enough to have Michael Krueger come and visit us. He was in the studio for about a week printing some of his work. We were able to sign up and help him print. Visiting artists often have sign ups for ‘master printer’ to help them out. A ‘master printer’ is not someone that is the best printer ever but rather a printer that adds the artist in the print process. Michael Krueger also talked to us about this work and the direction he is headed right now. He recently rediscovered all of his old high school and college doodles. He also found some old band posters and flyers from shows. His latest prints are made from these old flyers as well as reworking some new things over them. Some of these drawings were rather funny and he described them as slightly embarrassing but that is what makes them so great. Michael Krueger showed us a great deal of this work and really encouraged us to turn out doodles into real pieces of art.

Animation Process

The Flip Book process was very time consuming for such a small project but once is came together it looked really great. To come up with my idea I just thought of something that had a lot of motion in a short amount of time. I wakeboard a lot during the summers so I thought that would work great. Drawing the images took quite some time. Then I began scanning into the computer. This took me forever. It wouldn’t scan the whole images all together. I though of putting a colored piece of paper behind the small white paper so the computer could see there was something there. That worked so I did that for every piece. Then I had to go back into Photoshop and crop out the colored paper so that it was just the drawn image. All that was left after that was the easy part. I put all the images into Flash and it was done. After everything was said and done, the animation looked great.

Enchanted Response

Fountain of Youth by Jenny Schmid was my favorite piece in the Enchanted Exhibition. I love her depiction of people. There is a certain cartoony cutout type of thing going on that is hard not to enjoy. This piece reminds me about of her video that we watched earlier in the semester. I have also seen some of her prints hanging out around the print studio. Something about the people in her art is just so easy to identify with. It brings you back to when you were a kid and you played with boats and balloons, creating crazy stories in magical fairylands. I also enjoy the cartoon characters mixed into this real life setting. Fountain of Youth is just such a happy piece.

September 1, 2007

Project Studio E documentation images

Christina Norton

appropriating

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Christina Norton

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