3-Minute Egg

| 17 Comments

17 Comments

Handmade Photos

When I watched this video I really liked the idea of photography still being hand printed. It is a lost art now days with technological advances and everything being digitalized. There’s something more engaging when art takes you through a more physical process and the quality of the work always is much better. Especially in the photographs shown, the photos look so much more aged and I think are better to look at than a glossy digital photo printed off at Kinko’s. There is a more rustic look, but it also makes the photos turn more into art by getting away from the shoot and print aspect of photography and shows you the physical work the photographers put into it. These photos make you look at them longer to notice the subtleties and texture just by being hand printed. This more traditional, or even out dated procedure, is what I think separates good photos from great ones. I haven’t seen hand printed photos for years, and the quality of them surpass any photos in my recent memory.

On the 3-Minute Egg page, one video that interested me the most was the one called Open Eye: Toy Theater. I really thought it was so fascinating to use art in that 3D form bringing the work to life, in a sense. Instead of just a still piece or picture/painting, it was an object that each of these three artists made to come to life and create a story. Out of the three artists mentioned in this video, the one who's work I enjoyed the most was Kurt Hunter. He makes puppet like creatures out of paper. He said that he uses paper or other flimsy materials, like fabric, because they can freely move and as you make the creatures walk or climb you can see each slight movement, which makes for a very interesting and fun piece. I really thought that was cool and an interesting an unique way to use art. It made me want to go make flimsy paper animals, attach some string, and walk them around like puppets observing each movement they make.

The 3-Minute Egg video posted on April 15, titled “Masters Thesis Exhibition,” piqued my interest because it gave me a new insight into many of the works I had previously seen. When we visited the MFA exhibit, I viewed many of the works of art featured in the 3-Minute Egg video; however, I did not understand the work involving the Cerberus or Juana Berrio’s work about forced migration. The artists’ descriptions of their pieces allowed me to appreciate them on a new level, whereas I previously didn’t think much about the pieces. For example, Jessica Teckemeyr’s explanation of her near-death experience and its impact on her life made her work more sentimental to me. Furthermore, Juana Berrio’s compilation of pillows had a more powerful message once she explained that it had to do with Colombians not recognizing the injustices being done to many of their people. Overall, this clip helped me delve deeper into the minds of the artists to appreciate their work even more.

Gardens For Winter

In this video it represents how women didn’t have that much power in the art world but thanks to the help of Elizabeth Erickson, Joyce Lyon, and Sandra Menefee that has changed by creating the Women’s Art Registry of Minnesota. Each woman describes the art and how it means to them, and that women must contribute to the art world, because they have a different touch to the work that they do. In art there are memories of what you create. Their struggles are history and they think that they have to redo the art but the struggle is what makes the art. I wonder what made them consider doing this whole foundation? Was it just because they felt that women weren’t represented well in the art world? I think this is a great foundation to show of the work. It was interesting to find out about the opinions of the main founders, and what they clearly think about the artwork.

Alex Kuettel

The three-minute egg segment I chose to write about focused on the work of three different artists. The first artist is named Irve Dell and he is a sculptor. In this scene they focused on his work using toys as pieces of his sculpture. I like how he draws meaning from his kids toys and other objects around him, like his father’s prosthesis leg. The next artist was Kurt Hunter. He is a marionette artist who was working with paper in this segment. I thought it was pretty amazing the story he could tell with just paper and string. The last artist in this three minuet egg was Liz Schachterle. She was a very talented actor that used different media in her routine. In this three-minute egg she has a screen on her head that projects pictures that relate to her stories. She also uses puppets in her productions which add to her free-sprit personality.

The segment from 3minuteegg that I found the most interesting and decided to write about is the segment on ‘handmade photos’. It discussed skilled photographers still using old mediums of portraying their work; hand-printing. Although technology has always been advancing and various new ways of printing have been found, it is interesting to see that some photographers still choose to do handcrafted prints. Osama Esid’s work ‘The Play of Presentation’ was really fascinating especially knowing that it took 3 and a half years to create. The photographs he has serves to have a vintage feel to the image that is very captivating to the viewer. He said that his piece was printed using sunlight, which is something new that I had not known about before. Osama Esid evidently puts a lot of thought and process into not only creating these prints but also in the way he presents this in the gallery. For example with one of his pieces, he specifically chose it to be on a background of a brick wall to add the effect of extending the print to the brick which would be lost had it simply been right on the border of a frame. The handcrafted prints of Beth Dow and Keith Taylor are clearly different from Osama Esid’s work in the sense that their styles vary. Beth Dow’s work focuses more on the Victorian expedition photographers whilst Osama’s was what to me personally more interesting of the city swinging between fantasy and reality through vintage photography. Her work has a lot of clouds and vacancy of the white from the collodians. Her husband, Keith Taylor on the other hand is more into the darker colors. It was interesting to know that within the prints of Beth Dow and Keith Taylor their end results of their prints are completely different despite the fact that they go to the same places/location at the same time. Their works bring an old feel to it that usually would come across as boring but in these instances was very eye-catching. It looks more surreal which makes me want to see more prints of those styles and it definitely shows more passion in photography and printing with the contrasting colors of white and dark.

3 Minute Egg Responds

Purple Orange Jelloslave
Michelle Kinney and Jacqueline Ultan

The Purple Orange Jelloslave is a really unique band. A combination of different instruments combined into one is very interesting. Considering that the music they play, sounds very well put together. The cellists and their bandmates are the type of people who wants to make life more enjoyable. Instead of having the basic typically band group they have a variety you wouldn't normally think of as a typical band. Not only are they different from other typical bands, they have a great mix of songs genres that they like to play. Which makes them even better musicians.

Open Eye: Toy Theater
Irve Dell, Kurt Hunter, Liz Schachterle

First of all, I'd like to say that I am impressed at how many short videos there are on 3minuteegg.org. I think it is a great website where people could learn more about the art in Minnesota. I also find the interviews very useful in understanding the artists' purpose and philosophy behind their work as well as getting to know those people.

The piece that I want to respond to is at the very bottom of the April 10 submenu. In this short video, three artists from different art perspectives are interviewed.

Irve Dell is a sculptor and a performer who likes to animate objects. I like his idea of sort of giving life to toys instead of seeing them being used by someone. He shows us a couple of toys that he has made and he uses on stage. I especially liked the leg that was riding a bike. It brought to my mind the idea of wondering what toys would think of us or talk of us if they had a soul and were capable of thinking and speaking. I think Dell's style is a unique one and that he could accomplish much more one day. It also reminds me of the movie Saw because the objects are set up to do something just as in the movie. I think it is a little scary :)

Kurt Hunter is definitely a creative artist in my opinion. He is the type of an artist who can take one form of art and turn it into another in a visually-pleasing way. He is a marionette artist who uses paper figures that do not have joints. I think his job is a lot harder than that of traditional marionette artists working with wooden materials that are joined together. I think the paper figure is cute, and it seems his/her story is an interesting one from what the artist says.

Liz Schachterle's work is unusual. I haven't seen it anywhere else, which, to me, makes it something out of the ordinary. I like how she projects a bunch of figures onto a screen, making the viewever wonder what they are all about. Then, she tells a story, connecting each figure to something else; thus, revealing the meaning of the figures.

Open Eye: Toy Theater
Irve Dell, Kurt Hunter, Liz Schachterle

First of all, I'd like to say that I am impressed at how many short videos there are on 3minuteegg.org. I think it is a great website where people could learn more about the art in Minnesota. I also find the interviews very useful in understanding the artists' purpose and philosophy behind their work as well as getting to know those people.

The piece that I want to respond to is at the very bottom of the April 10 submenu. In this short video, three artists from different art perspectives are interviewed.

Irve Dell is a sculptor and a performer who likes to animate objects. I like his idea of sort of giving life to toys instead of seeing them being used by someone. He shows us a couple of toys that he has made and he uses on stage. I especially liked the leg that was riding a bike. It brought to my mind the idea of wondering what toys would think of us or talk of us if they had a soul and were capable of thinking and speaking. I think Dell's style is a unique one and that he could accomplish much more one day. It also reminds me of the movie Saw because the objects are set up to do something just as in the movie. I think it is a little scary :)

Kurt Hunter is definitely a creative artist in my opinion. He is the type of an artist who can take one form of art and turn it into another in a visually-pleasing way. He is a marionette artist who uses paper figures that do not have joints. I think his job is a lot harder than that of traditional marionette artists working with wooden materials that are joined together. I think the paper figure is cute, and it seems his/her story is an interesting one from what the artist says.

Liz Schachterle's work is unusual. I haven't seen it anywhere else, which, to me, makes it something out of the ordinary. I like how she projects a bunch of figures onto a screen, making the viewever wonder what they are all about. Then, she tells a story, connecting each figure to something else; thus, revealing the meaning of the figures.

Two Women Drawing

The piece I chose to watch was called "Two Women Drawing". It focuses on pieces by Megan Vossler and Jennifer Davis' shows at Franklin Art Works and First Amendment Gallery.

Megan has her pieces incorporate the wall, so that they seem to be drawn straight onto the surface of the wall. Her pieces are simple in color and rather small in size, but they tend to be in the more realistic span of things. She creates these intricate landscapes that just seem to naturally blend into the surrounding walls.

Jennifer Davis, on the other hand focuses more on color and fantasy. Most of her pieces incorporate animals and odd, but pastel colors. She uses the animals to represent ideas, and tends toward the phantasmagoric. The pieces she creates are more "cartoony" but still evoke emotion, be it joy, or sadness.

3-Minute-Egg:
A leaf in Spring: Justin Leaf

As a composer myself, it was fascinating to hear Justin talk about his artistic process. His mention of inspiration provided clarity about modern dance.

My experiences with modern dance have always been positive. However, it sometimes is difficult for me to understand. When he explained four small gestures which drove the dance piece, I suddenly understood where he was coming from.

He also mentioned his background in multiple dance forms (ballet, jazz, modern, burlesque, etc.). I also started my musical training in classical and have moved to a more modern approach.

Overall, this video provided insight into modern dance and some of its presence in Minneapolis. I hope to seek out these performances in Minneapolis in the future.

3-Minute Egg:
Poetic Assassins

In this 3 minute egg, they feature the spoken word duo, Verse and B.U.G.S.. This topic peaked my interest because I am very into hip-hop and one of the things that got me into it all was when I was a freshman in high school, a group of three spoken word artists (including Spawn, formerly of Atmosphere) came and performed at my school. It is so cool how they can express their beliefs and personal experiences in words with no music, but still give their poems the rhythm of a rap.
These two seem to be great at what they do because they know exactly what the other is thinking about and share a artistic link. I really liked the part when she explained why they don't really participate in the Minneapolis slam scene because it changes how they write and she feels like putting a score to her personal experiences would take away from the artistic value.
I love what this team is doing because I really appreciate this type of spoken word poetry. Especially because they are doing it solely for themselves and the artistic value the feel they are expressing. It says they perform at colleges occasionally, so I am hopeful they come to the U soon because I would definitely be interested in seeing them live.

"Tom Poole is Joking" is the name of the 3-Minute Egg segment I chose to respond to. I found this segment interesting in the way that Tom Poole's ideas and comedic art were displayed. Tom was talking throughout a majority of the segment while showing both him talking and parts of one of his shows as well. The things that Tom talked about were interesting because I find it neat to figure out how people come up with ideas and such. Tom mentioned that he does do some comissioned works, which end up limiting his idea range. However, he does end up writing other acts whether they will end up getting published or not. I think by showing Tom Poole's interview and parts of his comedic works makes it easier to understand the kinds of projects that he does, as well as, his comedic style.

a leaf in spring

This video shows and explains Minnesota Dance Theater's choreographer Justin Leaf in several different ways. Video footage of his choreography, as well as interviews and verbal narration. Some people may be mostly interested in the choreographer's perspective. Some in the"background" and details of the dance. Some just want to see the dancing itself. By using more than one way of elaborating, the video appeals to more people. I'm very picky when it comes to the styles of dance that I enjoy, so I was pleased that much footage of the piece itself was shown. It's like watching a movie preview, if you like what you see, you're more apt to go see the real thing. If the narrator and choreographer only talked about the piece, it would have been less successful in drawing people to see the performance.

Open Eye: Toy Theater
Irve Dell, Kurt Hunter, Liz Schachterie

This 3-minute egg was very interesting to me because I had no idea that pieces of paper could be used to dance and actually be considered art. It's definitely different but cool at the same time. I wonder how he even got the idea to create something like this and how he still has a passion for it.

I am also very curious as to how Liz got started on her art show thing. I honestly would not have the courage to put a giant screen on my head with a straight face. I enjoyed the fact that she explained how there are a bunch of pictures on the screen and then she tells a story that relates to all the pictures.

It's great to see how art has changed over time. It's not just about pictures and portraits anymore. Art has evolved in so many ways like in this egg that I'm curious as to what art will become in the future.

The 3-minute egg piece that was very interesting to me was titled "Music Lovers''. It was a play written and directed by a man named Alan Berks which follows what it was like to be apart of the local music scene and to be apart of a band that was trying to make it in the mid 90's. Growing up all of Alan's friends were in a band so he was constantly exposed to the local music scene and he got to experience what it was like to have the band lifestyle since he was always around it. In his play "Music Lovers" there is actually no music in the show, but rather it deals with the lifestyle that these bands are living. I think this is very unique because he could have easily turned it into a musical or something like that, but instead he focused on the point he was trying to convey, even though his actors are very talented musicians. It's also unique because this play isn't directed for the typical people that go to plays but rather for the people that go to the clubs. The director also tried to portray how in society today, there is almost this sense of extended adolsence, where people don't need to figure out what they want to do with their life until their 30. Overall, I really enjoyed this video and I think this would be a very cool play to go see.

The 3-minute egg is the new block on the mat, but what's with the name? according to the founder and 'recovering' furniture maker, jason (aka creative dude with a bad back), the name was hatched (i couldn't resist) because of the "great benefits [that] can come from a practice where one holds challenging poses for up to 3 minutes & restorative poses for at least 3 or more." jason also mentioned, that we should be on the lookout for "a series of 3-minute eggs-ercises which people can do at home or in the office when they don't have time for a complete practice. these different mini-routines will target different needs, and different parts of the body-mind connection."

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