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October 24, 2007

Tim Roby

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Tim Roby
robyx008@umn.edu
MFA year 3
Drawing and Painting

I am interested in the undistinguished visual experiences that we
habitually take for granted and ignore daily. I treat these visual
experiences as transformed icons in my paintings. These images walk
the line between being comfortable and familiar, and being uneasy and
irrational causing the viewer to have a "moment of discovery" similar
to what I have when I come across the original object or scene in our
daily landscape.

Sonja Peterson

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paper in front of acrylic
"a day without warnings or omens" 8' x 6', 2007

Sonja Peterson
Sonja@umn.edu
MFA Second year painting and drawing.

I create while trying to make sense of issues that are larger than life to me.
I would like my work to operate of dual levels- as a design of beauty that can also draw one into its complexities. The act of cutting out the negative gives a satisfaction of simplifying complexities that are out of ones reach. It is in a sense mapping a jumbled mind full of concerns for the entanglement of positive and negative, good and evil - the balance of power and energy.


paper in front of acrylic
"a day without warnings or omens" 8' x 6', 2007

Sarah Christianson

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Sarah Christianson
MFA 2nd Year, Photography
chri1742@umn.edu

My current project focuses on my family’s farm in eastern North Dakota. Through its 120 years, the farm has passed smoothly from one generation of Christianson men to the next. Now, this tradition is in danger of being broken, as no member of my generation has even expressed an interest in farming. Using old photographs, letters, journals, farm logs, and maps, I am combining them with my contemporary images to trace this heritage and history and the implications of its demise.

Mason Eubanks

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My methodology straddles meticulousness and ridiculousness and my forms, while optimistic, exist in concert with constructions that although carefully considered, can seem clumsy, gawky and vulnerable.

Mason Eubanks
2nd year MFA drawing and painting
euban012@umn.edu

Lauren Herzak-Bauman

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Lauren Herzak-Bauman
MFA 2nd Year Ceramics
herza008@umn.edu

Clay invokes in me a powerful sense of permanence, staying power, and strength. Underlying every artistic endeavor, I find a need to make permanent that which is fleeting. The realization of how quickly certain people and significant moments have escaped me is the driving force behind my current body of work.

Josh Winkler

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"Powerplants Pollinate each Bulb."

Josh Winkler
wink0167@umn.edu
MFA first year printmaking

We live in a silly world. Humankind is un-animal. Electricity and airplanes and WI FI have become basic needs. When we walk, we leave tire tracks. The roads flow, the semis roll, and the potholes grow. Still, we manage. I make drawings of it all happening.

jason gaspar

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Self-reflective, i want my work to function as short answers into my curiosities.

jason gaspar
gaspar0011@hotmail.com
MFA 1st year drawing and painting

Jon Mahnke

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Jon Mahnke
MFA Year 3 Printmaking
mahnk009@umn.edu

My most recent work uses the modular form of hair or fur to form larger structures, which are in turn overlaid onto photographs of my skin. The work emerges from a rhythmic drawing process that responds to and works against the photographic information in the background.

Laura Corcoran

Laura Corcoran
MFA Year 2 Printmaking
corco046@umn.edu

Anna Metcalfe

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Anna Metcalfe
metc0054@umn.edu
Year Two MFA Ceramics

I find boats extremely compelling as formal objects, and they inspire the objects that I make as well as represent ideas such as travel, transformation, renewal and transcendence - all ideas that bring meaning to the act of art-making and inspire my work conceptually. The idea of transformation in particular has become a term that both materially (clay becomes rock) and ideologically (in nature, society or as individuals) is a thread that runs through my art practice.

October 23, 2007

Toby Sisson

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"Nest" mixed media on paper, 30x22.

My current body of work is introspective, an intuitive response to the presence of artificial boundaries in my life — race, gender, age, and class. These drawings explore the abstract nature of these forces as they push and pull one another across an emotional landscape. The subsuming relationship of dark and light spaces represents both an interior and exterior struggle and its impact on the psyche.

Toby Sisson
MFA 2nd year painting and drawing
siss0009@umn.edu


TJ Barnes

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text 1. It's finger liken good
text 2. have it your way
text 3. good to the last drop

TJ Barnes
MFA year 1 Time and Interactivity
barne306@umn.edu

cheryl wilgren clyne

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cheryl wilgren clyne
clyne003@umn.edu
MFA year 3

As an artist and filmmaker, the complexity of childhood pulls me in for another look. For several years I have investigated the idea of self as it is constructed through language and communication in early childhood. This study continues. In my newest work, I have discovered the distortion that occurs with childhood revisited. Bearing in mind the power of costumes, rituals, and environments, narratives develop around the relationship these have to my subjects. My own experiences are measured throughout these assessments.

Some of my digital video projects also include a wide range of environmental examinations. These focus on the influence of the day-to-day and profound effects of what we take in mostly unaware.


artist statement and resume
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/clyne003/resume//
thesis exhibition
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/clyne003/mfathesis//

Stacey M. Holloway

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Stacey M. Holloway
MFA year 2 sculpture
holl0405@umn.edu

I have been studying how human emotions are portrayed in personal and societal relationships. In my artwork, I often use my own experiences as a child to express psychological subject matter and the effect that juvenescent adventure has on an individual as they mature. I construct unconventional self-portraits, family portraits, and communal portraits to stimulate my viewer to recall a memory of their own. In effect, I use articles from the past to make an impression on the present. Humor is a part of my delivery method and I intentionally make the work playful in order to encourage audience engagement.

Rebekah Champ

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There are only two constants in life: the body and the past.

Rebekah Champ
MFA 2nd year Printmaking
Rebekah.Champ@gmail.com

Rashad Butler

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Rashad Butler
MFA year 1 sculpture
butle246@umn.edu

I define the use of magic as the influence over matter, giving one the ability to manipulate form. The transformation of form gives the user power over human perception. The visual artist shares identity with the conjurer. I have always been amazed by the artist’s journey from the conception of an idea to its physical manifestation. It is a process that transforms and animates matter. My work illustrates this voyage. I build three-dimensional maps, evoking totemic ascension, intertwined with spiritually significant symbolism. These maps represent a journey from ideation (birth) through the building process (maturation) until complete manifestation (death) is reached. With this work I evoke the magical nature of art.

R. Justin Stewart

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R. Justin Stewart
3rd Year MFA with a focus on Art
rjustins@gmail.com

My work points to the to the complex nature of seeing and consequently understanding. As humans we attempt to understand the world around us through the isolation of information and entities. It is through organizing and categorizing that we are able to comprehend the vast array of information that we confront every day. I am specifically interested in the way categorizing and subsequently isolating entities often decontextualizes them resulting in a simplified understanding of the complex.

Michael Wong

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Michael Wong
MFA Year 2 sculpture
wong0227@umn.edu

The genre of the political cartoon has a tradition of depicting questionable moments in history. My work utilizes the cartoon and the moving image to point out omitted aspects of the recent past.

Mica Lee Anders

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Mica Anders
ande8472@umn.edu
MFA first year Photography

http://www.PleaseMarkOnlyOne.com/


I have created this website for two purposes:

* To raise awareness for those people who still don't understand that this is a big issue for a lot of people.
* To create a sense of community among those who already know/do.

Laura Primozic

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Laura Primozic
First year MFA ceramics
primo006@umn.edu

I am interested in creating a conversation visually between a beautiful object, that being an iceberg that is floating in the ocean with its attraction of surface and color, and the cause of it melting, global warming. It is only a beautiful object because it is an ugly cause.

Jessica Teckemeyer

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Jessica Teckemeyer
MFA Sculptor 1st year Graduate Student
jteckemeyer@hotmail.com

I enjoy working with a variety of materials that seduce the viewer's five senses. The work offers different levels of accessibility and denial to the sensual materials. My ideal audience is diverse in background, culture, and age.

Jasmine Wallace

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Jasmine Wallace
MFA First year ceramics
jwallace300@hotmail.com

I'm a ceramics graduate of Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax, Canada. Through the use of modeling, multi-firing and press molds, I create figurative ceramics that explore the human condition.

Gail Heidel

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My work is driven by systems and influenced by Minimalism, specifically the works of Carl Andre and Sol Lewitt. I reference these artists through the repetitive sculptural investigation of variation and modulation. Each module embodies the potential of endless interconnectivity of a larger system and
growth.

Gail Heidel
MFA 3rd year, ceramics
gailaheidel@yahoo.com

Caroline Kent

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Caroline Kent
MFA year 3 Drawing and Painting
kentx012@umn.edu

Caroline Houdek

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"Picnic Spot" 2007

Even the most average of places has a strange and unique quality. My photographs are about the
peculiarities in environments that are familiar to most people; I photograph things that people see every day, but do not pay attention to. Although my work is about people and culture, the spaces I photograph are always quiet and empty; there are no people around. I use large format color photography to show these places in an unaltered way. By photographing in that way I hope that my viewers will look at their world and start to see the details they have not noticed before, their beauty and their oddness.

Caroline Houdek
3rd year MFA photography
caroline@carolinehoudek.com

Carlos Degroot

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Carlos Degroot
MFA Year 3 Ceramics
degr0065@umn.edu

Currently i am exploring the man made and natural elements in a confined context.materials erode and construct within space of the piece.

Andrew Schroeder

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Andrew Schroeder
3rd year graduate student
Printmaking
schro440@umn.edu
andrewschroeder.net

Artist Statement

EACH CREATIVE ACT HAS THREE STAGES, THE FORMATIVE, THE ACTIVE, AND THE RECORD. I AM INTERESTED IN THE ACTIVE MOMENT BECAUSE IT CONTAINS THE EXPERIENCE OF THE CREATIVE ACT ITSELF. WHEREAS THE FORMATIVE STAGE IS LARGELY MENTAL, AND THE RECORD IS CONSIDERED THROUGH OUR BODY’S PERCEPTIONS, THE ACTIVE MOMENT IS FELT WITHOUT MEDIATION. IN EACH MOMENT WE ARE IN RELATION TO AN INCONCEIVABLE AMOUNT OF INFORMATION AND EXPERIENCE. WHEN OUR ENVIRONMENTS BECOMES QUIET OR SLOW, A RECEPTIVE FORM OF MAGIC OCCURS AND EXPERIENCES THAT ARE OFTEN OVERSHADOWED BECOME CLEAR. BY REMOVING THE OBJECTS FROM MY ART, I FOCUS ON THE RELATIONAL EXPERIENCE ITSELF. IT IS IN THE RELATIONAL EXPERIENCE THAT “I AM? CAN BECOME “WE ARE,? AND A FINITE FORM CAN CONTAIN INFINITY. I AM FOR AN ARTLIKE LIFE IN WHICH BEING IS THE RECORD OF THE CREATIVE ACT AND THE OBJECT OF CONTEMPLATION. I WORK UNDER THE NOTION THAT I MUST BECOME A BETTER PERSON TO MAKE BETTER ART AND BY MAKING BETTER ART I CAN BECOME A BETTER PERSON.

October 22, 2007

Christopher Baker

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Christopher Baker
MFA year 3
bakercp@umn.edu

david donovan

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Conceptually the foundation of my work focuses on mental illness. I tend to assemble found objects in a sculptural/installation format. I feel that this method coveys the attitude of my art in the most appropriate manner.

david donovan
donov096@umn.edu
MFA year 1 printmaking

Travis Freeman

I am interesting in the experiences of life becoming objects of art; objects of contemplation. By removing the physical objects from an experience, I bring focus to the subtle experiences that exist always but are rarely noticed. To be a better artist I must be a better person, and through making better art I can become a better person.

"image":

'Be here now: all things touch all things." Stand or sit facing another person. Ask that person to hold out one hand, palm facing up. Place your hand between one and four inches above the other person's hand. Leave your hand there until one of you decides to move.

Travis Freeman
freem278@umn.edu
MFA year 2 drawing and painting.

Stephen Rooney

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Stephen Rooney
roone078@umn.edu
MFA First year drawing and painting

Painting for me is like falling in love, it just happens. I never start with an intent, only feelings. I have presented you with a glimpse, it is as much yours as it is mine. Try to feel what is in-front of you.

Peter Haakon Thompson

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Peter Haakon Thompson
thom2301@umn.edu
MFA year 1 Photography

The studio where questions are answered and asked.

October 19, 2007

Photos from Open Studio