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Law and Religion in the Global Middle Ages, Saturday, October 24

"Religion and Law in the Global Middle Ages" brings together internationally distinguished scholars, faculty and students from the University of Minnesota, and community members including high school teachers, to discuss the period when some of our most compelling contemporary issues were first formulated.

To be held from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, 140 Nolte Center.

Click here to view the program for the event!

"Religion and Law in the Global Middle Ages" brings together internationally distinguished scholars, faculty and students from the University of Minnesota, and community members including high school teachers, to discuss the period when some of our most compelling contemporary issues were first formulated: for example, separation between religion and state, toleration of minority religious groups in a theocratic state, and authority to decide when and how sacred texts are binding. As Christianity and Islam came to be the dominant religions and legal systems in their respective regions and a scattered Jewish community maintained its identity through shared law, and other regions of the world developed traditions separate from the three interrelated cultures of Europe and the Middle East, the relation between religion and law was continually contested.

Keynote Speakers for the conference will be:

Anders Winroth, Yale. "The Pope's Two Jobs: Supreme Judge and Pastor of the Universal Church"

David Powers, Cornell. "The Abolition of Adoption in Islam and the Finality of Prophecy"

The conference is presented by by the Center for Medieval Studies, University of Minnesota, with generous funding from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation and the Provost's Imagine Fund. Cosponsors include the Center for Jewish Studies, the College of Liberal Arts, the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies, the Department of History, the European Studies Consortium, the Institute for Advanced Study, and the Law School's program in Legal History.

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