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Gender


Gender Equality in the US House: A State-by State Quarter-Century Report Card (1989-2014)

A study of 5,325 congressional elections finds the number of female U.S. Representatives has more than tripled over the last 25 years, but the rate at which women are elected to the chamber still varies greatly between the states.

Advantage Sink? Women Win US House Specials at More Than 2x Rate of General Elections

Since 1980, women have won nearly a quarter of the nation's 141 U.S. House special elections (and 58 percent of contests featuring only one female major party nominee), compared to just 11 percent of general election races.

Debbie Dingell Eyes Historic Win in 2014

Dingell could become the first non-widowed woman to immediately take over a spouse's seat in Congress.

One and Done: The Unusual Exit of Gloria Negrete McLeod

Negrete McLeod is one of just two U.S. Representatives out of the more than 210 California freshmen elected to the chamber since World War II not to run for a second term or seek a U.S. Senate seat.

A Brief History of Republican SOTU Responses

Cathy McMorris Rodgers is the fifth woman from the GOP to deliver a televised opposition response and the second youngest member overall in a congressional leadership position to do so.

The Final Six: Which State Will Next Elect Its 1st Woman to the US House?

Six states have yet to elect a woman to the U.S. House of Representatives, but one is poised to be crossed off that list in 2014.

Which States Have the Highest Rates of Female Gubernatorial Nominees?

Western states dominate the top of the list, with Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Nevada, Washington, and Wyoming all in the Top 10.

How Often Are Female Gubernatorial Nominees Victorious?

Incumbent female governors have won 83 percent of the time, while female challengers have won just six percent of gubernatorial general election contests.

Will Wisconsin Elect a Female Governor in 2014?

Women have yet to land a major party gubernatorial nomination in the Badger State, but that may all change with Mary Burke in 2014.

West Virginia 2014 US Senate Race to Feature Rare Matchup

Only 12 U.S. Senate elections have involved two major party female nominees in U.S. history and just two of these without a female incumbent.

100 Years of Minnesota Republican Gubernatorial Primaries

Gopher State Republicans have not had a competitive gubernatorial primary since 1924.

Meet the Three House Women Who Go by "Congressman"

Republicans Marsha Blackburn, Diane Black, and Cynthia Lummis are the lone holdouts from self-identifying as a "Congresswoman."

Herseth Sandlin and the US House to Senate Pathway

Just 10 of the 44 female U.S. Senators in history first served in the House of Representatives and three of the last 13 since 2002.

A Presidential Mother's Day Word Cloud

What words do presidents use as they honor women each year in presidential proclamations?

Democrats Hit the Wall Again in South Carolina Special Election

The Democratic Party's longest U.S. House pick-up drought in the nation extended to 48 consecutive losses in South Carolina Tuesday, where the party has failed to gain a seat for a quarter-century.

Colbert Busch: Making History in South Carolina?

Colbert Busch could become the sixth woman elected to Congress from South Carolina - but the first without political ties by marriage or birth.

Who's #1 (Part II)? The Media's 2016 Democratic Field

Hillary and Joe are ranked 1-2 in eight of 11 outlets under analysis with Andrew Cuomo solidly in third.

And the Most Notable First Lady Is...Laura Bush?

Laura Bush receives a 29 percent longer write-up than any other First Lady on the White House website's official bio pages.

Western Women: Regional Gender Disparities in Congressional Representation

Women have been elected to the U.S. House from western states at 2.5 times the rate as the rest of the country over the last century, with the region electing nearly 1/3 of all female-held seats with just 1/7 of all House seats.

Women Reelected to US Senate at Same Rate as Men

A study of more than 325 sitting U.S. Senators on the ballot since 1990 finds women have been reelected at exactly same rate as men - 87 percent.

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Political Crumbs

Small Club in St. Paul

Mark Dayton is one of just three Minnesotans ever elected to three different statewide offices. Dayton, of course, had previously served as State Auditor (1991-1995) and U.S. Senator (2001-2007) before winning the governorship in 2010. At that time, he joined Republicans Edward Thye and J.A.A. Burnquist on this very short list. Burnquist was elected governor in 1914 but then became governor after the death of Democrat Winfield Hammond in 1915. He then won the gubernatorial elections of 1916 and 1918 and eight terms as attorney general two decades later (1939-1955). Thye was similarly first elected lieutenant governor of the Gopher State and became governor after the resignation of fellow GOPer Harold Stasson in 1943. Thye won one additional full term as governor in 1944 and then two terms to the U.S. Senate (1947-1959). Twenty Minnesotans have been elected to two different statewide offices.


Respect Your Elders?

With retirement announcements this year by veteran U.S. Representatives such as 30-term Democrat John Dingell of Michigan, 20-term Democrat George Miller of California, and 18-term Republican Tom Petri of Wisconsin, it is no surprise that retirees from the 113th Congress are one of the most experienced cohorts in recent decades. Overall, these 24 exiting members of the House have served an average of 11.0 terms - the second longest tenure among retirees across the last 18 cycles since 1980. Only the U.S. Representatives retiring in 2006 had more experience, averaging 11.9 terms. (In that cycle, 10 of the 11 retiring members served at least 10 terms, with GOPer Bill Jenkins of Tennessee the lone exception at just five). Even without the aforementioned Dingell, the average length of service in the chamber of the remaining 23 retirees in 2014 is 10.2 terms - which would still be the third highest since 1980 behind the 2006 and 2012 (10.5 terms) cycles.


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