Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


Immigration


36 US Representatives with Spanish-Language Web Pages

31 Democrats and five Republicans provide some Spanish-language content on their official U.S. House websites.

When Will Obama Stop Using the Term "Illegal Immigrant?"

The Associated Press has now officially dropped the term, but the President has mentioned "illegal immigrants" 28 times since taking office, including as recently as two months ago.

Harry Truman, Presidential Press Corps Used 'Wetback' Slur in 1950s

When Don Young was 18 years old, President Truman used the term "wetbacks" in a written message to Congress.

Southern U.S. Representatives Leading the Campaign Against Illegal Immigration

Nearly half of Southern U.S. House incumbents address illegal immigration on campaign websites, compared to 30 percent from the West, 23 percent in the Midwest, and 14 percent out East

GOP U.S. House Incumbents Six Times More Likely to Run Get-Tough on Illegal Immigration Campaigns than Democrats

Half of Republican incumbents are highlighting get-tough anti-illegal immigration policy solutions on campaign websites compared to just 8 percent of Democrats

Minnesota U.S. Representatives Silent on Illegal Immigration on Campaign Websites

Delegation campaign websites largely silent on issue as support to adopt Arizona's anti-illegal immigration law eclipses 60 percent in Minnesota

Anti Illegal Immigration Sentiment Strong in Minnesota, though Weaker than Most of the Nation

Arizona immigration law enjoys majority support in Minnesota, though lower than most states

Live Blog: Security and Immigration in a Post 9/11 United States

12:05 p.m. Edward Alden, Senior Fellow at the Council of Foreign Relations, is delivering a talk today at the Humphrey Institute entitled, "Security and Immigration in a post-9/11 United States. Alden is the author of the recent book, The Closing of the American Border: Terrorism, Immigration and Security Since 9/11....

Immigration Concerns Linger in Upper Midwest Even As Issue Fades from Presidential Race

During the heat of the Republican nomination battle, GOP candidates were criticized by many pundits and pro-immigration advocates for inflaming the public fear of illegal immigration as well as for artificially pushing the policy issue on the front burner of their campaigns. To some extent, illegal immigration became a...

Tom Tancredo's Exit and the Immigration Legacy

Republican Congressman Tom Tancredo's departure from the GOP race on Thursday didn't cause a big ripple on the political scene. But, for a candidate who never polled above 5 percent in any state or national poll other than his home state of Colorado, Tancredo did help leave a footprint on...

Wisconsinites Overwhelmingly Back Tough Measures Against Illegal Immigrants

A new poll of 500 likely Wisconsin voters by Rasmussen Reports demonstrates how immigration remains a largely non-partisan issue among the electorate, even while there is a partisan divide on the issue between the Republican and Democratic presidential candidates. Wisconsin has voted Democratic in each of the last 7 elections...

Terrorism, Immigration Key Issues to Iowa Republican Caucus Vote Choice

A new ABC News / Washington Post poll finds terrorism and illegal immigration topping the list of most important issues determining vote choice among likely Iowa Republican caucus voters. Fourteen percent cited terrorism and national security issues as the most important factor, while thirteen percent cited illegal immigration in the...

Richardson and Obama Unlikely to Bolster Support in Iowa After CNN Debate

CNN's Thursday night Democratic debate from Las Vegas revealed some policy positions from Bill Richardson and Barack Obama that may not have been previously known to the average democratic voter. Presuming other candidates like Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden, or Chris Dodd are able to exploit this information on the campaign...

Illegal Immigration A Red Hot Issue In Battleground States

When Hillary Clinton stated her qualified support for a New York State law giving driver's licenses to illegal immigrants, she was criticized on two fronts: being out of step with the vast majority of Americans on the issue plus not giving a straight answer when pressed further on the...

Immigration Gaffe Doesn't Erode Clinton's Lead in Iowa...Yet

Hillary Clinton still leads the race for the nod of Democratic caucus voters in Iowa, according to the latest Zogby poll. The survey, conducted November 6 of 502 likely Democratic caucus voters, measures voter preferences a week after an MSNBC Democratic debate in which Clinton had a much-publicized gaffe on...

Tancredo Yet to Effectively Leverage Immigration Issue In Iowa

Colorado Congressman and Republican presidential candidate Tom Tancredo boasts traditional conservative credentials, but has made a name for himself in the U.S. House during the past decade primarily on a single issue: as a staunch advocate for border security and putting an end to illegal immigration – particularly along...

The 'Nays' Have It: Upper Midwest Senate Delegation & Full Body Vote Against Immigration Bill

On Thursday the United States Senate voted against cloture on the high profile immigration reform bill that divided politicians on Capitol Hill much more than the American public. Overall, a vast majority of Americans opposed the bill, advocating 'enforcement first' immigration policies, such as sealing the border, before contemplating...

GOP Presidential Candidates Stand Together For English As Official Language

Ten Republican presidential candidates debated at St. Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire on Tuesday night in their third debate this campaign season. As a follow-up to our previous Smart Politics entry, the Republicans departed starkly from their Democratic counterparts, who debated at St. Anselm on Sunday night, on the...

English As Official Language: Democrats Misread America's Preferences in NH Debate

Eight Democratic candidates debated at St. Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire on Sunday night. While the headlines from the debate focused on Iraq and health care, by far the most controversial stances carved out by the presidential hopefuls was their unwillingness to have English become the nation's official language....

Illegal Immigration Issue Hits Minnesota While Bill Moves Through Congress

As Congress attempts to push a controversial immigration bill through Capitol Hill, the issue of illegal immigration came to the forefront in Minnesota this week. More than two-dozen individuals in a prostitution ring were indicted on Monday by federal authorities after arrests made over the weekend. The indictment claims...

1 2  


Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


more POLITICAL CRUMBS

Humphrey School Sites
CSPG
Humphrey New Media Hub

Issues />

<div id=
Abortion
Afghanistan
Budget and taxes
Campaign finances
Crime and punishment
Economy and jobs
Education
Energy
Environment
Foreign affairs
Gender
Health
Housing
Ideology
Immigration
Iraq
Media
Military
Partisanship
Race and ethnicity
Reapportionment
Redistricting
Religion
Sexuality
Sports
Terrorism
Third parties
Transportation
Voting