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Reapportionment


Will Iowa Republicans Lose Every US House Seat for the First Time in History?

Republicans have won at least one U.S. House seat from the Hawkeye State since 1856.

History Says Wisconsin's Freshmen GOP U.S. House Members Will be Safe in 2012

It has been 100 years since the last Wisconsin House freshman lost in a redistricting cycle

King vs. Latham Matchup Would Be 1 in 100 Event in Iowa GOP Politics

Only 1 pair of 101 Republican U.S. Representatives serving in a redistricting cycle has squared off in a renomination battle in Iowa history

Missouri's Population Trends Over the Last 100 Years

The Show Me State has dropped from the 7th to the 18th most populous state in the nation since 1910, losing half of its U.S. House seats along the way

Ohio's Population Rank Over the Last 100 Years

Five decades of sluggish growth see the Buckeye State shed one third of its U.S. House delegation since 1960

Wisconsin's Population Rank Over the Last 100 Years

Badger State population has dropped from 13th to 20th in the nation over the past century

Iowa's Population Rank Over the Last 100 Years

Iowa has been eclipsed in population by 15 states since its #15 ranking after the 1910 Census (and passed none)

Minnesota's Population Rank Over the Last 100 Years

The Gopher State has ranked as high as #17 and as low as #21 for population in the U.S. since the 1910 Census

South Dakota Edges Minnesota for Largest Population Growth Rate in Midwest

South Dakota ends a string of three consecutive decades in which Minnesota led the 12-state region in rate of growth

Reapportionment Election Cycles See Highest Turnover in Partisan Control of Presidency

Political parties have lost control of the White House in years ending in '2' at more than twice the rate than all other election cycles since the 1850s

Western States to Eclipse Midwest in Representation to U.S. House for First Time in History

It took 160 years, but Western states will finally eclipse the Midwest in the number of Representatives it sends to D.C. in 2012

Reapportionment Winners and Losers Through the Years

Pennsylvania (-17 seats) and New York (-16 seats) have lost the largest number of seats from their peak U.S. House delegations; the Keystone State is slated to lose a seat again for a 9th consecutive census period

Population Booms and Busts Across Minnesota's 87 Counties This Decade

Soaring population in central Minnesota and southern metropolitan regions to require eventual carving up of 6th and 2nd Congressional Districts after 2010

Minnesota Leads Midwest in Birth-to-Death Ratio; Will Its 8th U.S. House Seat Be Saved?

With the U.S. Census and reapportionment just around the corner, reports have come out during the past year, including data from Minnesota's own state demographer, that indicate the Gopher State is in real danger of losing a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2012. While that may still...

How to Save Minnesota's U.S. House Seat: More Teenage Mothers?

Last month Smart Politics examined the political impact on the state of Minnesota should it lose one U.S. House seat as projected by many analysts, including a recent report issued by Election Data Services. Earlier this week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new data detailing the teenage...

Upper Midwestern Reapportionment, Part II: A Historical Overview

In a follow-up to yesterday’s discussion of the 2012 projected reapportionment, Smart Politics presents two tables to illustrate the diminishing political influence of Minnesota and the Upper Midwestern battleground states in the U.S. House as a result of population shifts in the United States. Table 1 demonstrates how the projected...

How Much Will 2012 Reapportionment Reduce Minnesota’s Political Influence?

About a year ago Smart Politics examined the political impact of Iowa losing a seat in the U.S. House, as it is projected to do after the 2012 reapportionment. State Demographer Tom Gillaspy recently projected Minnesota is also on track to lose a seat. Should this occur, the impact on...

Political Influence of Upper Midwest In Decline?

Iowa's influence on presidential politics is in the spotlight right now, with its caucuses now just 37 days away, on January 3, 2008. The winner of each party's caucus is by no means guaranteed to go on and win the nomination, but a surprise showing can go a long way...

Iowa Projected to Lose 1 Congressional Seat in 2012 Reapportionment

The Hotline, the on-line wing of National Journal, is reporting that Iowa is one of a handful of states projected to lose one seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in the 2012 reapportionment that will occur after the 2010 Census. Losing representation in Congress is nothing new to Iowans,...



Political Crumbs

Mary Burke: English First?

While multiculturalism and bilingualism are increasingly en vogue in some quarters as the world seemingly becomes a smaller place, one very high profile 2014 Democratic candidate does not shy away from the fact that she only speaks one language: English. In an attempt to highlight her private sector credentials working for Trek Bicycle, Wisconsin Democratic gubernatorial nominee Mary Burke boasts on her campaign bio page how she made great strides in international business dealings...while only speaking English: "Despite not speaking a single foreign language, she established sales and distribution operations in seven countries over just three years." Note: According to 2010 Census data, nearly half a million Wisconsinites over five years old speak a language other than English at home, or 8.7 percent, while 4.6 percent of Badger State residents do not speak English at all.


Does My Key Still Work?

Much has been made about Charlie Crist's political transformation from Republican to independent to Democrat en route to winning the Florida GOP and Democratic gubernatorial nominations over a span of eight years. Party-switching aside, Crist is also vying to become just the second Florida governor to serve two interrupted terms. Democrat William Bloxham was the first - serving four year terms from 1881 to 1885 and then 1897 to 1901. Florida did not permit governors serving consecutive terms for most of its 123 years prior to changes made in its 1968 constitution. Since then four have done so: Democrats Reubin Askew, Bob Graham, and Lawton Chiles and Republican Jeb Bush.


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