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Terrorism


The Quotable Jim Sensenbrenner

One of Capitol Hill's most outspoken critics of the mass data collection undertaken by the last two presidential administrations shares his thoughts on fear-mongering, Edward Snowden, and the long winter of 2014.

64 Percent of 9/11 Legislators Are Out of Congress

Only 36 percent of the 531 U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives in office on September 11, 2001 are still in Congress.

Off the Radar? Chechnya Never Mentioned in Public by Obama

Bill Clinton and George W. Bush discussed the troubled region nearly 100 times over a 10-year period that saw two Chechen wars and high-profile terrorist acts that killed several hundred Russians.

Obama Has Mentioned Terrorism Nearly 1,500 Times as President

Although accused by some of being too gun-shy in using the term, the president has mentioned terrorism (and terror-derived words) an average of one time per day while in office.

The Top Five Smart Politics Reports of 2011

A look back at some of the most illuminating and controversial of the 200+ Smart Politics reports published this year.

Study: Faint Praise for Obama in U.S. House After Qaddafi's Death

Only six House Democrats and one Republican issue press releases crediting Obama in ending the Libyan dictator's regime.

Andre Carson and Keith Ellison Respond to bin Laden Killing

Ellison's relative Twitter silence on the killing of bin Laden is noteworthy insomuch as the congressman had tweeted 14 times over the weekend including six times on Sunday

Political Flashback: What Politicians Were Saying About Libya in 2004

Many Republicans and Democrats sang a different tune about Libya and Colonel Ghadafi just a few years ago

Former FBI Special Agent Ali Soufan Speaks on Torture and the War on Terrorism at Humphrey Institute

"I know how it is to look evil in the face."

The Pessimistic Purple: Why Are Voters in Swing States the Most Discontented?

Analysis of Rasmussen polling finds purple state residents have the most dire outlook about their financial situation and the war on terrorism; red state residents are the most optimistic

Former MN GOP Congressman Weber Outlines National Security Challenges Facing President Obama

"The world has been getting more dangerous as we've been arguing about health care."

Jesse Ventura Lobbies for Ambassador Post to Cuba

Former Governor Jesse Ventura appeared on Larry King Live Monday evening to promote the paperback release of his latest book, Don’t Start the Revolution Without Me, and offered his trademark rapid-fire quips on a range of subjects, from Barack Obama’s first 100 days, to the drug war, to torture, to...

New Yorker's Jane Mayer to Speak on Terrorism at Humphrey Institute

Author and New Yorker contributor Jane Mayer will be giving a talk on terrorism and the politics of the Barack Obama administration at the Humphrey Institute on Tuesday afternoon. "Can Obama Avoid the Dark Side? Learning from how the War on Terror turned into the War on American Ideals" Jane...

Former Deputy AG James Comey Views Obama as "Credible" Leader in Counterterrorism Fight

James Comey, the 6 foot 8 inch former U.S. Deputy Attorney General who, in March 2004, stood figuratively and literally between President George W. Bush and the recertification of a NSA domestic intelligence program while Attorney General John Ashcroft was gravely ill, offered both criticism of the Bush administration's counterterrrorism...

Live Blog: Security and Immigration in a Post 9/11 United States

12:05 p.m. Edward Alden, Senior Fellow at the Council of Foreign Relations, is delivering a talk today at the Humphrey Institute entitled, "Security and Immigration in a post-9/11 United States. Alden is the author of the recent book, The Closing of the American Border: Terrorism, Immigration and Security Since 9/11....

Live Blog: Building a Better, Safer World: What Would a McCain Presidency Do?

12:40 p.m. "Building a Better, Safer World: What Would a McCain Presidency Do?" is the third panel today at the Humphrey Institute's series of forums entitled, America's Future: Conversations about Politics and Policy during the 2008 Republican National Convention. The discussion is moderated by Nina Easton (Washington Bureau Chief, Fortune)....

Terrorism, Immigration Key Issues to Iowa Republican Caucus Vote Choice

A new ABC News / Washington Post poll finds terrorism and illegal immigration topping the list of most important issues determining vote choice among likely Iowa Republican caucus voters. Fourteen percent cited terrorism and national security issues as the most important factor, while thirteen percent cited illegal immigration in the...



Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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