Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


Coleman and Klobuchar Release Joint Statement on Minneapolis Bridge Collapse

Bookmark and Share

Minnesota Senators Norm Coleman and Amy Klobuchar released a joint statement tonight on the tragic I-35 bridge collapse over the Mississippi River in Minneapolis that occurred on Wednesday evening.

Minnesota Senators Norm Coleman and Amy Klobuchar send their thoughts and prayers to the people of Minnesota, and pledge the full support of the federal government in the wake of tonight's tragic bridge collapse in Minneapolis, MN. Senators Coleman and Klobuchar have been in constant contact with Secretary of Transportation Mary Peters, and will travel to Minneapolis with the Secretary in the morning to survey the damage and recovery efforts. They have pledged to ensure every available federal resource makes its way to Minnesota immediately, and to help the Minnesota Department of Transportation move forward.

"In light of today's disaster, we send our thoughts and prayers to the victims and their families. This is a tragic day for the state, and must first focus on rescue and recovery. The people of Minnesota should know we will devote the full resources of the government in any way possible," said Coleman. "The Secretary of Transportation assured me that a thorough and complete forensic investigation will be conducted, which I hope will produce a definitive answer as to why this unbelievable disaster has occurred. We must ensure that a catastrophe like the one that happened today never occurs again."

"This tragedy hits so close to home—in fact, within a mile of my family's home," said Klobuchar, a former Hennepin County Attorney and long-time Minneapolis resident. "Our thoughts and prayers are with the many people affected by this evening's shocking bridge collapse. Most importantly, we are grateful to the many first responders who have moved so quickly to help the victims of this unfortunate accident," said Klobuchar. "On behalf of the entire Minnesota delegation, we are committed to working together to bring all available federal resources to bear in the wake of this tragedy."

Fifth district Rep. Keith Ellison (DFL) addressed the U.S. House tonight on the incident and stated in part:

"I rise tonight with every member of that Minneapolis delegation. We stand united in our heartfelt concern over the news of the collapse of the 35-W bridge spanning the Mississippi River in my hometown of Minneapolis which occurred earlier this evening. I've spoken with Mayor Rybak regarding this tragic situation and I pledge to work with him in every possible way to recover from this disaster. ... I intend to return home tomorrow morning to Minneapolis on the earliest possible flight to do everything I can to help the citizens of my city recover from this tragedy."

Previous post: Coleman's Lead Shrinks Over DFL-ers in New SurveyUSA Poll
Next post: Coleman and Klobuchar Seek $250 Million for I-35 Bridge Reconstruction

Leave a comment


Remains of the Data

Is There a Presidential Drag On Gubernatorial Elections?

Only five of the 20 presidents to serve since 1900 have seen their party win a majority of gubernatorial elections during their administrations, and only one since JFK.

Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


more POLITICAL CRUMBS

Humphrey School Sites
CSPG
Humphrey New Media Hub

Issues />

<div id=
Abortion
Afghanistan
Budget and taxes
Campaign finances
Crime and punishment
Economy and jobs
Education
Energy
Environment
Foreign affairs
Gender
Health
Housing
Ideology
Immigration
Iraq
Media
Military
Partisanship
Race and ethnicity
Reapportionment
Redistricting
Religion
Sexuality
Sports
Terrorism
Third parties
Transportation
Voting