Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


Live Blog: Andrew Kohut (Pew Research Center) On Global Attitudes Towards the U.S.

Bookmark and Share

7:00 p.m. Andrew Kohut of the Pew Research Center gives his second talk of the day, entitled: "They Don't Like Us: Global Attitudes Toward the U.S. and other World Powers." The Pew Global Attitudes Project began in June 2001, initially to examine globalization issues and democratization. After September 11th, however, the focus shifted towards those issues that came to the fore after America's launch of the war on terror thereafter. The Project has been the principle chronicler of the rise of anti-Americanism.

7:15 p.m. In 2002, the Project noted America's reputation was 'slipping;' by 2003 it had 'plummeted.' By 2006, the negative attitudes towards the U.S. had become 'entrenched' - these were not transitory attitudes.

7:20 p.m. In Germany, favorable attitudes towards the U.S. fell from 78 percent in 2002 to 30 percent in 2007. In Turkey, it fell from 55 percent to 9 percent. However, attitudes are still pretty favorable in most of Africa, India, and Japan. These areas notwithstanding, anti-Americanism has gone global.

7:25 p.m. Kohut states that views of the American people has also declined, in more than 20 of the 33 countries surveyed. Americans are seen as hard-working, but also greedy, violent, and immoral. The leading cause of anti-Americanism in the MIddle East is, of course, Israel. Muslim nations do not believe the U.S. handles the Israeli-Palestine conflict fairly. The second leading cause is the U.S. role in Iraq.

7:30 p.m. The U.S. is seen as not doing enough to deal with global problems and yet also takes unilateral action without international approval on too many occasions. Kohut's research has found America is seen as too powerful across the globe, and that America wants to rule the world. An element of anti-Americanism in Europe is due to differing views about the use of force. There is greater support for preemptive war in the U.S. than in Europe. Anti-Americanism is also fueled by anti-globalization. People around the world respect American technology and welcome our products and pop culture (though not in the Muslim world). And yet, these countries feel they are being too Americanized. There is also a difference in values -- Americans are more individualistic and resistant to limiting personal freedoms. However, value differences are much less responsible for anti-Americanism than policy decisions.

7:40 p.m. The Global Attitudes Project has also found increased negative attitudes towards other global powers, such as Russia and China. There is increased concern with regards to China for both their military power and their burgeoning economic power.

7:45 p.m. In a question and answer session with Dean Atwood of the Humphrey Institute, Kohut states that the next U.S. president may get a bit of a honeymoon in attitudes towards the U.S., but that there will still remain a deep distrust of American power. There is great suspicion about American motives towards democratization in all countries studied by the Global Attitudes Project.

7:55 p.m. Kohut states every Muslim country surveyed said that they do not believe the state of Israel can coexist with the human rights of the Palestinians being protected.

7:58 p.m. Kohut states that American optimism tends to lead the country to not address the serious issues that the country needs to address.

8:00 p.m. Kohut states that public diplomacy is not going to 'move the needle' -- actions, he said are much more powerful than spin or clarification.

Previous post: Live Blog: Andrew Kohut (Pew Research Center) On the 2008 Elections
Next post: Democrats Still Lead GOP Presidential Hopefuls in MN

1 Comment


  • WAIT UNTIL THE RESULTS OF
    THE RECOUNT BEFORE DRAWING
    CONCLUSIONS ABOUT THE N.H.
    PRIMARY VOTE.

  • Leave a comment


    Remains of the Data

    No Free Passes: States With 2 Major Party Candidates in Every US House Race

    Indiana has now placed candidates from both major parties on the ballot in a nation-best 189 consecutive U.S. House races, with New Hampshire, Minnesota, Idaho, and Montana also north of 100 in a row.

    Political Crumbs

    Gubernatorial Highs and Lows

    Two sitting governors currently hold the record for the highest gubernatorial vote ever received in their respective states by a non-incumbent: Republican Matt Mead of Wyoming (65.7 percent in 2010) and outgoing GOPer Dave Heineman of Nebraska (73.4 percent in 2006). Republican Gary Herbert of Utah had not previously won a gubernatorial contest when he notched a state record 64.1 percent for his first victory in 2010, but was an incumbent at the time after ascending to the position in 2009 after the early departure of Jon Huntsman. Meanwhile, two sitting governors hold the record in their states for the lowest mark ever recorded by a winning gubernatorial candidate (incumbent or otherwise): independent-turned-Democrat Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island (36.1 percent in 2010) and Democrat Terry McAuliffe of Virginia (47.8 percent in 2013).


    An Idaho Six Pack

    Two-term Idaho Republican Governor Butch Otter only polled at 39 percent in a recent PPP survey of the state's 2014 race - just four points ahead of Democratic businessman A.J. Balukoff. Otter's low numbers reflect his own struggles as a candidate (witness his weak primary win against State Senator Russ Fulcher) combined with the opportunity for disgruntled Idahoans to cast their votes for one of four third party and independent candidates, who collectively received the support of 12 percent of likely voters: Libertarian John Bujak, the Constitution Party's Steve Pankey, and independents Jill Humble and Pro-Life (aka Marvin Richardson). The six candidate options in a gubernatorial race sets an all-time record in the Gem State across the 46 elections conducted since statehood. The previous high water mark of five candidates was reached in seven previous cycles: 1902, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1914, 1966, and 2010.


    more POLITICAL CRUMBS

    Humphrey School Sites
    CSPG
    Humphrey New Media Hub

    Issues />

<div id=
    Abortion
    Afghanistan
    Budget and taxes
    Campaign finances
    Crime and punishment
    Economy and jobs
    Education
    Energy
    Environment
    Foreign affairs
    Gender
    Health
    Housing
    Ideology
    Immigration
    Iraq
    Media
    Military
    Partisanship
    Race and ethnicity
    Reapportionment
    Redistricting
    Religion
    Sexuality
    Sports
    Terrorism
    Third parties
    Transportation
    Voting