Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


Live Blog: Andrew Kohut (Pew Research Center) On Global Attitudes Towards the U.S.

Bookmark and Share

7:00 p.m. Andrew Kohut of the Pew Research Center gives his second talk of the day, entitled: "They Don't Like Us: Global Attitudes Toward the U.S. and other World Powers." The Pew Global Attitudes Project began in June 2001, initially to examine globalization issues and democratization. After September 11th, however, the focus shifted towards those issues that came to the fore after America's launch of the war on terror thereafter. The Project has been the principle chronicler of the rise of anti-Americanism.

7:15 p.m. In 2002, the Project noted America's reputation was 'slipping;' by 2003 it had 'plummeted.' By 2006, the negative attitudes towards the U.S. had become 'entrenched' - these were not transitory attitudes.

7:20 p.m. In Germany, favorable attitudes towards the U.S. fell from 78 percent in 2002 to 30 percent in 2007. In Turkey, it fell from 55 percent to 9 percent. However, attitudes are still pretty favorable in most of Africa, India, and Japan. These areas notwithstanding, anti-Americanism has gone global.

7:25 p.m. Kohut states that views of the American people has also declined, in more than 20 of the 33 countries surveyed. Americans are seen as hard-working, but also greedy, violent, and immoral. The leading cause of anti-Americanism in the MIddle East is, of course, Israel. Muslim nations do not believe the U.S. handles the Israeli-Palestine conflict fairly. The second leading cause is the U.S. role in Iraq.

7:30 p.m. The U.S. is seen as not doing enough to deal with global problems and yet also takes unilateral action without international approval on too many occasions. Kohut's research has found America is seen as too powerful across the globe, and that America wants to rule the world. An element of anti-Americanism in Europe is due to differing views about the use of force. There is greater support for preemptive war in the U.S. than in Europe. Anti-Americanism is also fueled by anti-globalization. People around the world respect American technology and welcome our products and pop culture (though not in the Muslim world). And yet, these countries feel they are being too Americanized. There is also a difference in values -- Americans are more individualistic and resistant to limiting personal freedoms. However, value differences are much less responsible for anti-Americanism than policy decisions.

7:40 p.m. The Global Attitudes Project has also found increased negative attitudes towards other global powers, such as Russia and China. There is increased concern with regards to China for both their military power and their burgeoning economic power.

7:45 p.m. In a question and answer session with Dean Atwood of the Humphrey Institute, Kohut states that the next U.S. president may get a bit of a honeymoon in attitudes towards the U.S., but that there will still remain a deep distrust of American power. There is great suspicion about American motives towards democratization in all countries studied by the Global Attitudes Project.

7:55 p.m. Kohut states every Muslim country surveyed said that they do not believe the state of Israel can coexist with the human rights of the Palestinians being protected.

7:58 p.m. Kohut states that American optimism tends to lead the country to not address the serious issues that the country needs to address.

8:00 p.m. Kohut states that public diplomacy is not going to 'move the needle' -- actions, he said are much more powerful than spin or clarification.

Previous post: Live Blog: Andrew Kohut (Pew Research Center) On the 2008 Elections
Next post: Democrats Still Lead GOP Presidential Hopefuls in MN

1 Comment


  • WAIT UNTIL THE RESULTS OF
    THE RECOUNT BEFORE DRAWING
    CONCLUSIONS ABOUT THE N.H.
    PRIMARY VOTE.

  • Leave a comment


    Remains of the Data

    Gender Equality in the US House: A State-by State Quarter-Century Report Card (1989-2014)

    A study of 5,325 congressional elections finds the number of female U.S. Representatives has more than tripled over the last 25 years, but the rate at which women are elected to the chamber still varies greatly between the states.

    Political Crumbs

    Small Club in St. Paul

    Mark Dayton is one of just three Minnesotans ever elected to three different statewide offices. Dayton, of course, had previously served as State Auditor (1991-1995) and U.S. Senator (2001-2007) before winning the governorship in 2010. At that time, he joined Republicans Edward Thye and J.A.A. Burnquist on this very short list. Burnquist was elected governor in 1914 but then became governor after the death of Democrat Winfield Hammond in 1915. He then won the gubernatorial elections of 1916 and 1918 and eight terms as attorney general two decades later (1939-1955). Thye was similarly first elected lieutenant governor of the Gopher State and became governor after the resignation of fellow GOPer Harold Stasson in 1943. Thye won one additional full term as governor in 1944 and then two terms to the U.S. Senate (1947-1959). Twenty Minnesotans have been elected to two different statewide offices.


    Respect Your Elders?

    With retirement announcements this year by veteran U.S. Representatives such as 30-term Democrat John Dingell of Michigan, 20-term Democrat George Miller of California, and 18-term Republican Tom Petri of Wisconsin, it is no surprise that retirees from the 113th Congress are one of the most experienced cohorts in recent decades. Overall, these 24 exiting members of the House have served an average of 11.0 terms - the second longest tenure among retirees across the last 18 cycles since 1980. Only the U.S. Representatives retiring in 2006 had more experience, averaging 11.9 terms. (In that cycle, 10 of the 11 retiring members served at least 10 terms, with GOPer Bill Jenkins of Tennessee the lone exception at just five). Even without the aforementioned Dingell, the average length of service in the chamber of the remaining 23 retirees in 2014 is 10.2 terms - which would still be the third highest since 1980 behind the 2006 and 2012 (10.5 terms) cycles.


    more POLITICAL CRUMBS

    Humphrey School Sites
    CSPG
    Humphrey New Media Hub

    Issues />

<div id=
    Abortion
    Afghanistan
    Budget and taxes
    Campaign finances
    Crime and punishment
    Economy and jobs
    Education
    Energy
    Environment
    Foreign affairs
    Gender
    Health
    Housing
    Ideology
    Immigration
    Iraq
    Media
    Military
    Partisanship
    Race and ethnicity
    Reapportionment
    Redistricting
    Religion
    Sexuality
    Sports
    Terrorism
    Third parties
    Transportation
    Voting