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Smart Politics Live Blogging at Andrew Kohut (Pew Research Center) Events

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Smart Politics will be live blogging at two events on Wednesday, September 26th. The Center for the Study of Politics and Governance is hosting Andrew Kohut of the Pew Research Center at the Humphrey Institute:

"What to Watch in the 2008 Elections"
Much of the nation's attention focuses on the performance of the presidential candidates, with the press often scoring them as actors in a new theater production. Personality matters but there are other critical factors that may matter more in determining who Americans pick as their next president. Andrew Kohut, President of the Pew Research Center, in Washington, DC. and Director of the Pew Research Center for The People & The Press will identify the keys to the 2008 elections that many in the press miss.

Wednesday September 26
Noon—1:30pm
Cowles Auditorium
Hubert H. Humphrey Center
301 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455

"They Don't Like Us: Global Attitudes Toward the U.S. and other World Powers"
The U.S. and western democracies have drawn the envy of the world for their prosperity and freedom. The terrorist attacks on 9/11 and the response of the U.S. in Afghanistan and Iraq has precipitated a sharp down turn in approval and respect for the U.S. around the globe. Andrew Kohut, Director of the most extensive global surveys of public attitudes toward the United States, will report on his latest findings and their implications for America's future foreign policy. Humphrey Institute Dean and former administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development during the Clinton administration, J. Brian Atwood, will moderate this event.

Wednesday September 26
7:00pm—8:30pm
Cowles Auditorium
Hubert H. Humphrey Center
301 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Andrew Kohut is the President of the Pew Research Center, in Washington, DC. He also acts as Director of the Pew Research Center for The People & The Press and the Pew Global Attitudes Project. Kohut was President of The Gallup Organization from 1979 to 1989. Kohut is a press commentator on the meaning and interpretation of opinion poll results. In recent national elections, he has served as a public opinion consultant and analyst for National Public Radio. Kohut often comments on public opinion for television news programs including the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer. He has written widely about public opinion for leading newspapers and magazines, as well as for scholarly journals. He is a frequent op-ed essayist for The New York Times and in the past has been a regular columnist for the Columbia Journalism Review and AOL News. Kohut has co-authored four books, including, mostly recently, America Against the World (Times Books) and The Diminishing Divide: Religion's Changing Role in American Politics, (Brookings Institution Press).

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Remains of the Data

Plurality-Winning Governors Elected At Century-Long High Water Mark

The rate of gubernatorial candidates elected without the support of a majority of voters is at its highest level since the 1910s.

Political Crumbs

Seeing Red

Congressman Nick Rahall's failed bid for a 20th term in West Virginia this cycle, combined with a narrow loss by Nick Casey to Alex Mooney in Shelley Moore Capito's open seat, means that West Virginia Democrats will be shut out of the state's U.S. House delegation for the first time in over 90 years. The Republican sweep by two-term incumbent David McKinley in the 1st CD, Mooney in the 2nd, and Evan Jenkins over Rahall in the 3rd marks the first time the GOP has held all seats in the chamber from West Virginia since the Election of 1920. During the 67th Congress (1921-1923) all six seats from the state were controlled by the GOP. Since the Election of 1922, Democrats have won 76 percent of all U.S. House elections in the Mountain State - capturing 172 seats compared to 54 for the GOP.


Home Field Advantage?

When the 114th Congress convenes in a few days, Maine will be represented by one home-grown U.S. Representative: Waterville-born Republican Bruce Poliquin. With the departure of Millinocket-born Mike Michaud, who launched a failed gubernatorial bid, the Pine Tree State was poised to send a House delegation to D.C. without any Maine-born members for the first time since 1821. Three-term U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree (born in Minnesota) coasted to reelection as expected, however Poliquin edged Kentucky-born Emily Cain by 5.3 points to keep the streak alive. Since 1876, a total of 208 of the 222 candidates elected to the nation's lower legislative chamber from the state have been born in Maine, or 94 percent.


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