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Libertarian Ballot Option On the Rise in Wisconsin

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Whether it is because the Libertarian Party has a well-known nominee in the Presidential race in Bob Barr (though not necessarily well-regarded in Libertarian leadership circles), whether it is because the Libertarian base has been fired up due to the successful candidacy of Ron Paul, or whether it is simply due to an increased dissatisfaction among the electorate with government itself, the Libertarian Party has mounted a healthy comeback in the state of Wisconsin in 2008.

In district races for the State Assembly, Libertarian Party candidates will appear on seven ballots (Districts 7, 29, 30, 61, 62, 67, and 91). In 2006, the Party failed to field a single candidate in any of the State’s 99 Assembly races. This year marks the second largest number of Libertarians in the field during the last six election cycles dating back to 1998 (with the 10 candidates in 2002 being the high water mark during that span).

The Libertarians will also field one candidate in the race for the State’s open 18th Senate District after not running a candidate in any of the 17 Senate races in 2006.

Likewise, the Party will run two candidates in U.S. House races – in the 1st and 3rd Districts – after not fielding any candidates in the last election cycle.

Bob Barr will be on the presidential ballot in Wisconsin – seeking to improve upon the record 1.3 percent garnered by Libertarian Edward Clark in the Badger State in the 1980 presidential race.

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3 Comments


  • The cause is the steady leadership of new State Chair Jim Maas.

  • I believe most of it came from the LPWI focusing on doing the basics and doing them consistently. There were actually hundreds of volunteers from the last 4 years working to encourage and support candidates in the LPWI this election cycle.

    Give them a call at 1-800-236-9236 xt 3 and learn more. You may even have some answer the phone. Pretty basic, isn't it? when the phone rings, answer it.

  • SO glad Bob Collison is gone!
    I ran on the ticket in '02 and he didn't hv a clue.
    Bob Barr is on the ballot and it's time to stop voting for that "lesser of 2 evils" - - it's still evil!
    @ least I don't hv to defend my stance for a stand when my kids are 30 (don't trust any1 over 30, remember?).
    Read the Constitution.

  • Leave a comment


    Remains of the Data

    Strange Bedfellows: A Historical Review of Divided US Senate Delegations

    Over the last century, states have been twice as likely to be represented by a single political party in the U.S. Senate than have a split delegation; only Delaware, Iowa, and Illinois have been divided more than half the time.

    Political Crumbs

    Haugh to Reach New Heights

    The North Carolina U.S. Senate race between Democratic incumbent Kay Hagan and Republican Thom Tillis may go down to the wire next Tuesday, but along the way Libertarian nominee Sean Haugh is poised to set a state record for a non-major party candidate. Haugh, who previously won 1.5 percent of the vote in the Tar Heel State's 2002 race, has polled at or above five percent in 10 of the last 12 polls that included his name. The current high water mark for a third party or independent candidate in a North Carolina U.S. Senate election is just 3.3 percent, recorded by Libertarian Robert Emory back in 1992. Only one other candidate has eclipsed the three percent mark - Libertarian Christopher Cole with 3.1 percent in 2008.


    Gubernatorial Highs and Lows

    Two sitting governors currently hold the record for the highest gubernatorial vote ever received in their respective states by a non-incumbent: Republican Matt Mead of Wyoming (65.7 percent in 2010) and outgoing GOPer Dave Heineman of Nebraska (73.4 percent in 2006). Republican Gary Herbert of Utah had not previously won a gubernatorial contest when he notched a state record 64.1 percent for his first victory in 2010, but was an incumbent at the time after ascending to the position in 2009 after the early departure of Jon Huntsman. Meanwhile, two sitting governors hold the record in their states for the lowest mark ever recorded by a winning gubernatorial candidate (incumbent or otherwise): independent-turned-Democrat Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island (36.1 percent in 2010) and Democrat Terry McAuliffe of Virginia (47.8 percent in 2013).


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