Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


Live Blog: Climate Change and Energy Security

Bookmark and Share

9:45 a.m. The second panel this morning at the Humphrey Institute's America's Future: Conversations about Politics and Policy during the 2008 Republican National Convention is entitled "Climate Change and Energy Security." Moderated by Reid Detchon (Executive Director, Energy and Climate, United Nations Foundation), the panelists are former New York Governor George E. Pataki (Chairman, Pataki-Cahill Group), Robert C. McFarlane (former National Security Advisor to President Reagan, President McFarlane Associates, Inc.), R. James Woolsey (fromer Director of Central Intelligencce under President Clinton, Venture Partner, VantagePoint Venture Partners), and J. Michael Davis (Assistant Laboratory Director, Energy and Environment, Northwest National Laboratory, former Assistant Secretary of Energy under President George H.W. Bush).

9:53 a.m. Bud McFarlane believes the U.S. is in a fix with our dependence on foreign oil, but that in 15 years the U.S. can, not only reduce that dependence with new technologies, but also have a new fleet of cars that will reduce pollution lower than levels required by the Kyoto Treaty.

10:01 a.m. Davis says markets need to be shaped by policy, as they do not care about security interests. Electricity is taken for granted, Davis states, and we need to reshape our way of thinking on the demand side.

10:05 a.m. Detchon introduces Pataki as a 'green Republican.' Pataki says there is no area that is more important for policy to impact markets - and it can do so in a positive way. Pataki believes government needs to create incentives for our transportation and energy sectors.

10:12 a.m. Former CIA Director Woolsey says energy must be as secure as possible, as cheap as possible, and as clean as possible. Woolsey states we need to prepare for malignant (accidental) problems as well as malevolent problems (e.g. terrorists). Regarding oil, 9 out of 10 of the largest oil producing nations (Norway being the exception) are kingdoms or dictatorships. Woolsey says we need to move towards using electricity and flexible fuel vehicles. Brazilians went from 5 percent to 75 percent of its vehicle fleet which are flexible fuel in just two years.

10:25 a.m. McFarlane explains how energy policy and security issues in China explain their lack of support for U.N. resolutions to have meaningful sanctions against Iran as well as their seeming indifference to the crisis in Darfur (where China has significant energy investments in both Iran and Sudan). The same can be said for the Europeans towards Russia.

10:45 a.m. Pataki says we need a consistent national policy on energy. The U.S. should lead by example, Pataki states, in order to get China and India to reduce their own emissions.

10:51 a.m. Woolsey says in the venture capital business there is an incentive to look for new, disruptive, innovative practices. Upwards of 85 percent of such investments fail.

11:01 a.m. McFarlane believes there is hope for Detroit being on the brink of a Renaissance in terms of new technology cars. Woolsey agrees and says the president of GM is committed to having some of its vehilcles run on electricity, flex-fuels etc. in the next few years.

11:12 a.m. Both Davis and McFarlane indicate support for drilling in ANWAR, though this is not the overall focus of their energy strategies discussed today.

Previous post: Live Blog: Faith and Politics
Next post: Live Blog: The Future of U.S. Foreign Assistance

1 Comment


  • I only hope they will have a talk about alternative energy and ways of using it soon.

  • Leave a comment


    Remains of the Data

    Kevin McCarthy Becomes Least Tenured Floor Leader in US House History

    At less than four terms, McCarthy has served 423 fewer days in the chamber than any floor leader in U.S. House history and almost 10 years less than the average leader.

    Political Crumbs

    The Second Time Around

    Former Republican Congressman Bob Beauprez became the seventh major party or second place gubernatorial candidate in Colorado to get a second chance at the office when he narrowly won his party's nomination last month. Two of the previous six candidates were successful. Democrat Alva Adams lost his first gubernatorial bid to Benjamin Eaton in 1884, but was victorious two years later against William Meyer. Democrat Charles Johnson placed third in 1894 behind Republican Albert McIntyre and Populist incumbent Governor David Waite but returned as the Fusion (Democrat/Populist) nominee in 1898 and defeated GOPer Henry Wolcott. Gubernatorial candidates who received a second chance but lost both general elections include Democrat Thomas Patterson (1888, 1914), Progressive Edward Costigan (1912, 1914), Republican Donald Brotzman (1954, 1956), and Republican David Strickland (1978, 1986).


    How Are the Plurality Winners Doing?

    Nearly 40 percent of plurality winners of U.S. Senate elections lose their seat in the next election cycle. Will that happen to any of the three such incumbents on the ballot in 2014? Recent polling suggests Democrats Al Franken of Minnesota, Mark Begich of Alaska, and Jeff Merkley of Oregon all currently have an advantage over their nominated/frontrunning GOP opponents, but each is flirting with plurality support once again. Franken led endorsed GOPer Mike McFadden 48 to 42 percent in a new SurveyUSA poll while the polling group showed Merkley with a 50 to 32 percent advantage over Monica Wehby. Begich led each of the three major GOP candidates in last month's PPP survey: 42 to 37 percent over Daniel Sullivan, 41 to 33 percent over Mead Treadwell, and 43 to 27 percent over Joe Miller.


    more POLITICAL CRUMBS

    Humphrey School Sites
    CSPG
    Humphrey New Media Hub

    Issues />

<div id=
    Abortion
    Afghanistan
    Budget and taxes
    Campaign finances
    Crime and punishment
    Economy and jobs
    Education
    Energy
    Environment
    Foreign affairs
    Gender
    Health
    Housing
    Ideology
    Immigration
    Iraq
    Media
    Military
    Partisanship
    Race and ethnicity
    Reapportionment
    Redistricting
    Religion
    Sexuality
    Sports
    Terrorism
    Third parties
    Transportation
    Voting