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Upper Midwestern House Delegation Split in Support of Financial Industry Bailout Bill

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The rejection by the U.S. House today of the $700 billion financial industry bailout package was the result of a stranglely-cobbled coalition of conservative Republicans, blue-dog Democrats, and liberal Democrats. The bill, backed by President George W. Bush, eventually won the support of just 205 Representatives, with 228 voting ‘nay.’

Approximately 60 percent of House Democrats supported the bill, along with less than one-third of Republicans. Joining the Republicans in opposition were high profile members of the House such as the very liberal Dennis Kucinich of Ohio and libertarian Republican Ron Paul of Texas.

The Upper Midwestern delegation from Iowa, Minnesota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin was evenly split on the bill – 11 in support of the measure and 11 opposed.

However, of the eight Upper Midwestern House Republicans, only two supported the bill: John Kline (MN-02) and Paul Ryan (WI-01). Voting against the bill were Tom Latham (IA-04), Steve King (IA-05), Jim Ramstad (MN-03), Michele Bachmann (MN-06), James Sensenbrenner (WI-05), and Tom Petri (WI-06).

Democrats from the region favored the measure by a nine to five margin. (Had that margin held across the country the bill would have passed).

Blue Dog Democrats Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (SD-at large) and Collin Peterson (MN-07) voted against the measure, although fellow Blue Dog Leonard Boswell (IA-03) supported it. Also voting ‘nay’ were Freshmen Democrats Bruce Braley (IA-01), Tim Walz (MN-01), and Steven Kagen (WI-08).

Joining Boswell in favor of the bailout bill were first term Representatives David Loebsack (IA-02) and Keith Ellison (MN-05), who joined with senior members of the chamber David Obey (WI-07) and James Oberstar (MN-08). Betty McCollum (MN-04), Tammy Baldwin (WI-02), Ron Kind (WI-03), and Gwen Moore (WI-04) also voted for the measure.

Voting Yes
David Loebsack (IA-02)
Leonard Boswell (IA-03)
John Kline (MN-02)
Betty McCollum (MN-04)
Keith Ellison (MN-05)
James Oberstar (MN-08)
Paul Ryan (WI-01)
Tammy Baldwin (WI-02)
Ron Kind (WI-03)
Gwen Moore (WI-04)
David Obey (WI-07)

Voting No
Bruce Braley (IA-01)
Tom Latham (IA-04)
Steve King (IA-05)
Tim Walz (MN-01)
Jim Ramstad (MN-03)
Michele Bachmann (MN-06)
Collin Peterson (MN-07)
Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (SD-at large)
James Sensenbrenner (WI-05)
Tom Petri (WI-06)
Steven Kagen (WI-08)

Previous post: Weekend Upper Midwestern Presidential Poll Roundup
Next post: Election Profile: South Dakota U.S. House (At-large) (2008)

1 Comment


  • I am not surprised by Bachman's vote as she does not seem to understand that this vote could be very bad. Look what happened to the market after the vote. I feet that these people have put politics first and forgot about everything else. I urge all voters to only support the congress people that suppoted the bill and thought about what is going to happen and not how important they are.

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