Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


MN Senate Election Analysis, Part 1: Franken Underperforms in Northern Minnesota

Bookmark and Share

On the surface, there are several similarities between the 2008 U.S. Senate race and the 2006 gubernatorial race in Minnesota.

· Both races featured 1-term Republican incumbents facing reelection in Democratic wave election years and, pending a change of fate in the U.S. Senate recount, Republicans emerged victorious in each contest.

· Both races also found the Republican incumbents (Tim Pawlenty in 2006 and Norm Coleman in 2008) surging from a deficit in the polls the week prior to the election. Pawlenty trailed DFL gubernatorial nominee Mike Hatch in 9 of the last 10 polls conducted the month before Election Day in 2006. Coleman trailed DFL U.S. Senate nominee Al Franken in 9 of 11 polls heading into the last week of the campaign in October 2008.

· Both races in 2006 and 2008 were also tightly decided with the vote for the Independence Party candidates far exceeding the margin of victory, and viewed by many analysts to have disproportionately (and adversely) impacted DFLers Hatch and Franken.

However, despite the similarities between these two elections, there was significant movement within the Minnesota electorate from 2006 to 2008 that brought the Gopher State to its current situation: a recount of nearly 3 million votes. Each candidate can point to underperforming in different regions of the state.

In the case of Al Franken – the subject of the first part in our two-part analysis – he can look to Northern Minnesota as one of the reasons he is waiting on the recount results, instead of packing his bags for D.C.

Smart Politics analyzed where Al Franken lost ground for the DFL in 2008 through an examination of the marginal differences between the GOP and DFL candidates in the 2006 gubernatorial and 2008 U.S. Senate races.

(In brief, Smart Politics examined the margin of victory or loss between the Republican and DFL candidates from year-to-year. A comparison was not conducted between the raw percentages of Hatch and Franken (or Pawlenty and Coleman), as that analysis would be skewed by Independence Party candidate Dean Barkley’s much stronger performance in the 2008 U.S. Senate race than IP nominee Peter Hutchinson in the 2006 gubernatorial race).

Of the 20 counties comprising the Northeast and Northwest sections of the state, Al Franken lost ground vis-à-vis Mike Hatch in 19 of them.

Now, even though Northeastern Minnesota is largely DFL country, Norm Coleman made inroads in all six counties in the region, including the populous Democratic stronghold of St. Louis County.

Franken lost 19 points vis-à-vis Hatch/Pawlenty in Koochiching County, 13 points in Lake County, 12 points in St. Louis County, 10 points in Carlton County, 9 points in Itasca County, and 3 points in Cook County. In 2006, Hatch carried St. Louis County by a whopping 35-point margin: 65 to 29 percent. In 2008, Franken won the county by just 23 points: 55 to 32 percent.

Meanwhile, Northwestern Minnesota leans Republican, though much less than Northeastern Minnesota leans Democratic (Franken carried 4 of the 14 counties in the Northwestern region – Beltrami, Kittson, Mahnomen, and Norman).

Still, Norm Coleman was able to further solidify this thinly populated region of the Gopher State for the Republicans by improving on Tim Pawlenty’s margin of victory or loss in 13 of the 14 counties.

In fact, Franken lost ground from Hatch’s benchmark by double-digit margins in 8 of these counties: in Red Lake (by 20 points), Lake of the Woods (14 points), Clearwater (14 points), Kittson (14 points), Pennington (13 points), Marshall (13 points), Polk (11 points), and Hubbard (10 points).

Franken also endured an increased deficit for the DFL in Norman County (9 points), Roseau (9 points), Beltrami (5 points), Mahnomen (5 points), and Becker (4 points).

Franken did manage to move the DFL in a positive direction in one county: Clay, the most heavily populated county in the region. Franken’s margin of loss was 5 points less in 2008 (3 points) than Hatch’s in 2006 (8 points).

While Franken severely underperformed in Northern Minnesota, he also turned in a lackluster performance in the state’s Central counties. Central Minnesota is also largely GOP country, although Franken did carry 6 of the region’s 28 counties (Aitkin, Big Stone, Chippewa, Lac Qui Parle, Pine, and Swift).

Franken, however, lost ground in 18 of these 28 counties, while gaining ground in just 7 (there was no change between Franken-Coleman and Hatch-Pawlenty in 3 counties: Crow Wing, Meeker, and Stevens).

Compared to the North, however, the region was much more flat – none of the 28 counties experience double-digit shifts from 2006 to 2008 (the largest change took place in Wadena County, with a 7-point swing for Coleman).

Still, even if by small margins, Franken lost key votes in Aitkin (-3 points), Big Stone (-4), Cass (-1), Chippewa (-5), Chisago (-2), Grant (-1), Isanti (-2), Kanabec (-4), Kandiyohi (-1), Lac Qui Parle (-1), Mille Lacs (-2), Morrison (-2), Otter Tail (-3), Pine (-4), Pope (-2), Traverse (-6), Wadena (-7), and Wilkin (-2) Counties.

Franken gained ground in Benton (+5 points), Douglas (+3), Sherburne (+4), Stearns (+6), Swift (+1), Todd (+1), and Wright (+3) Counties.

Smart Politics will turn to Norm Coleman’s lost opportunities around the Gopher State in its next installment.

Previous post: Iowa Democrats Enjoying Historic Run in House of Representatives
Next post: MN Senate Election Analysis, Part 2: Norm Coleman’s Metro Slide

3 Comments


  • A complete campaign quotomg people like the secretary of the Minnesota AFL-CIO Steve Hunter, then he said "Norm Coleman does not stand with the working families of Minnesota he stands on their throats."

    Links to Norm Coleman big Lobbyist donations from Big usiness and you all no the rest.

    With a race this close if Franken wins all he can say is "Thank God for Jack Shepard" we will have remove the senator Norm Coleman who fillibustered the most times in history; the main reason that no thing was passed and America had a 12% excellent job rating for our Congree.

    Dr. Jack Shepard, a past contender for the GOP Nomination for U.S. Seante who ran against Sen. Coleman in the Minnesota Primary becasue I just do not like people who vote against incresing healthcare for our Minnesota kids but votes for Billions of dollars in Tax breaks for Big Oil Companies who donated to him with millions etc.

  • Failure to engage the base, reliance on mass media vs. authentic grassroots characterized both Hatch and Franken campaigns.

    Both candidates failed to increase turnout in Minneapolis/CD 5 and that area has the highest Democratic index but the lowest turnout.

    Both candidates were center-right DFLers, the party now supports Single Payer healthcare in the platform, the party and most democrats preferred Barkley's willingness to frankly discuss the inappropriate U.S. investment in militarism and foreign military adventures, permanent military bases abroad.

  • Leave a comment


    Remains of the Data

    Gender Equality in the US House: A State-by State Quarter-Century Report Card (1989-2014)

    A study of 5,325 congressional elections finds the number of female U.S. Representatives has more than tripled over the last 25 years, but the rate at which women are elected to the chamber still varies greatly between the states.

    Political Crumbs

    Final Four Has Presidential Approval

    By edging Michigan in the final seconds Sunday, the University of Kentucky guaranteed that one school in the Final Four this year would be located in a state that was not carried by President Barack Obama in 2012. (Connecticut, Florida, and Wisconsin had previously earned Final Four slots over the weekend). Across the 76 Final Fours since 1939, an average of 3.1 schools have been located in states won by the president's ticket during the previous election cycle. All four schools have come from states won by the president 29 times, with the most recent being the 2009 Final Four featuring Connecticut, Michigan State, North Carolina, and Villanova. On 30 occasions three Final Four schools have been located in states won by the president, with two schools 11 times and only one school six times (the most recent being 2012 with Kansas, Kentucky, Louisville, and Ohio State). There has never been a Men's NCAA Division I Final Four in which no schools were located in states carried by the president's ticket.


    Three for the Road

    A new Rasmussen Poll shows Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker in a dead heat with likely 2014 Democratic nominee Mary Burke. Walker is seeking to win his third consecutive election after prevailing in 2012's recall contest. Eight of his predecessors accomplished this feat: Republicans Lucius Fairchild (in 1869), Jeremiah Rusk (1886), Robert La Follette (1904), Emanuel Philipp (1918), John Blaine (1924), Walter Kohler (1954), Warren Knowles (1968), and Tommy Thompson (1994). Three others Badger State governors lost on their third campaign: Democrat George Peck (1894), Progressive Philip La Follette (1938), and Republican Julius Heil (1942). One died in office before having the opportunity to win a third contest (GOPer Walter Goodland in 1947) while another resigned beforehand (Democrat Patrick Lucey in 1977 to become Ambassador to Mexico). Overall Wisconsin gubernatorial incumbents have won 35 of 47 general election contests, or 74.5 percent of the time.


    more POLITICAL CRUMBS

    Humphrey School Sites
    CSPG
    Humphrey New Media Hub

    Issues />

<div id=
    Abortion
    Afghanistan
    Budget and taxes
    Campaign finances
    Crime and punishment
    Economy and jobs
    Education
    Energy
    Environment
    Foreign affairs
    Gender
    Health
    Housing
    Ideology
    Immigration
    Iraq
    Media
    Military
    Partisanship
    Race and ethnicity
    Reapportionment
    Redistricting
    Religion
    Sexuality
    Sports
    Terrorism
    Third parties
    Transportation
    Voting