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Presidents Day Special: The Astrological Signs of the Presidents

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Elected presidents most frequently born under the sign of Aquarius (1 in 5); Sarah Palin only leading contender of 2012 GOP rumored candidates to be born under this sign

(This report is the third installment in Smart Politics' 'Pathway to the White House' Series. Past reports analyzed from what state presidents come and how frequently presidents have been elected without carrying their home states).

The celebration of George Washington's Birthday, or Presidents Day, appropriately falls this year on February 15th, under the sign of Aquarius.

Appropriately, that is, as a Smart Politics analysis finds that of the 56 presidential elections in U.S. history, 20 percent (11) have been won by those born under the sign of Aquarius (although not Washington) - more common than any other astrological sign.

There have been five Aquarius presidents, and presidential scholars frequently rank three of them among the Top 10 Presidents of all time: Abraham Lincoln (February 12), Franklin D. Roosevelt (January 30), and (the critically surging) Ronald Reagan (February 6). William McKinley (January 29), and William Henry Harrison (February 9) round out the list.

One bleak spot for the Aquarius club - four of the five died in office with the fifth, Reagan, nearly assassinated in 1981. Nonetheless, these presidents proved to be quite popular, with all but Harrison elected to more than one term in office.

There have also been five Scorpios elected president - although none since 1920. Two Scorpios died in office and none were elected to more than one term: John Adams (October 30), James Polk (November 2), James Garfield (November 19), Teddy Roosevelt (October 22), and Warren Harding (November 2).

Thirty-three percent of presidential elections have been won by candidates born under the signs of Aquarius (11) or Pisces (8), which follows Aquarius on the astrological calendar. Four presidents - each elected to two terms - were Pisces: George Washington (February 22), James Madison (March 16), Andrew Jackson (March 15), and Grover Cleveland (March 18).

The longest astrological drought - at 206 years and counting - is currently being endured by Aries. Thomas Jefferson (April 13) is the last and only elected president born under the sign of The Ram, when he was reelected in 1804.

Leos have made a strong showing in recent years, winning three of the last five presidential races, with Bill Clinton (August 19) and Barack Obama (August 4) as members. There have been four Leos elected president, as well as four Tauruses.

Most Common Astrological Signs of Elected Presidents

Sign
Elections won
# Presidents
Last
Aquarius
11
5
1984
Pisces
8
4
1892
Taurus
6
4
1948
Scorpio
5
5
1920
Leo
5
4
2008
Cancer
4
3
2004
Libra
4
3
1976
Capricorn
4
2
1972
Sagittarius
3
3
1852
Gemini
2
2
1988
Virgo
2
2
1964
Aries
2
1
1804
Data compiled by Smart Politics.

And which rumored 2012 Republican presidential candidate has the astrological goods to take on the surging Leos?

As it turns out - none other than Sarah Palin. Born on February 11th, Palin is the only Aquarius of the leading batch of rumored GOP contenders.

Pisces Mitt Romney (March 12) has the next best astrological history on his side with Virgo Mike Huckabee (August 24), Sagittarius Tim Pawlenty (November 27), Geminis Bobby Jindal (June 10) and Newt Gingrich (June 17), Capricorn John Thune (January 7), and Libra Haley Barbour (October 22) on less sound astrological footing.

The Astrological Signs of Elected Presidents

President
Birthday
Sign
Washington
February 22, 1732
Pisces
J. Adams
October 30, 1735
Scorpio
Jefferson
April 13, 1743
Aries
Madison
March 16, 1751
Pisces
Monroe
April 28, 1758
Taurus
J.Q. Adams
July 11, 1767
Cancer
Jackson
March 15, 1767
Pisces
Van Buren
December 5, 1782
Sagittarius
W.H. Harrison
February 9, 1773
Aquarius
Polk
November 2, 1795
Scorpio
Taylor
November 24, 1784
Sagittarius
Pierce
November 23, 1804
Sagittarius
Buchanan
April 23, 1791
Taurus
Lincoln
February 12, 1809
Aquarius
Grant
April 27, 1822
Taurus
Hayes
October 4, 1822
Libra
Garfield
November 19, 1831
Scorpio
Cleveland
March 18, 1837
Pisces
B. Harrison
August 20, 1833
Leo
McKinley
January 29, 1843
Aquarius
T. Roosevelt
October 27, 1858
Scorpio
Taft
September 15, 1857
Virgo
Wilson
December 28, 1856
Capricorn
Harding
November 2, 1865
Scorpio
Coolidge
July 4, 1872
Cancer
Hoover
August 10, 1874
Leo
F. Roosevelt
January 30, 1882
Aquarius
Truman
May 8, 1884
Taurus
Eisenhower
October 14, 1890
Libra
Kennedy
May 29, 1917
Gemini
L. Johnson
August 27, 1908
Virgo
Nixon
January 9, 1913
Capricorn
Carter
October 1, 1924
Libra
Reagan
February 6, 1911
Aquarius
G.H.W. Bush
June 12, 1924
Gemini
Clinton
August 19, 1946
Leo
G.W. Bush
July 6, 1946
Cancer
Obama
August 4, 1961
Leo
Note: Presidents not elected into office include Capricorns Millard Fillmore (January 7) and Andrew Johnson (December 29), Aries John Tyler (March 29), Cancer Gerald Ford (July 14), and Libra Chester Arthur (October 5). Data compiled by Smart Politics.

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6 Comments


  • You left out the 13th president Millard Filmore

  • & you missed John Tyler

  • This analysis only examined elected presidents.

  • They were elected John Tyler 10th, Millard Filmore 13th, Anderw Johnson 17th, Chester Arthur 21th, & Gerald Ford 37th which were all left.

  • Ohhh only Elected Presidents ok ok

  • Not sure if u noticed the asterisk at the bottom of the chart.

  • Leave a comment


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    Political Crumbs

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