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Numerology Alert: Will 1/11/11 Be a Notable Day in U.S. History?

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Dates in American history with numerical curiosity have largely been unremarkable

If New Year's Day (1/1/11) did not seem particularly noteworthy a week and a half ago, those who subscribe to numerology have a few more chances this year as they attempt to link numbers with real world events, including today, January 11, 2011 (1/11/11).

Over the last century, however, U.S. history has only provided a few examples of notable events on other eyebrow-raising dates on the calendar.

Many days came and went without much fanfare, such as February 2nd and 22nd of 1922, March 3rd, 1933, July 7th, 1977, and September 9th, 1999.

Even April 4th, 1944 was a relatively quiet day in U.S. history, despite the nation being embroiled in World War II.

There are, of course, exceptions, as notable events in American history are bound to take place even on dates with interesting numerical combinations.

For example, on May 5th, 1955 (5/5/55) West Germany became a sovereign state as the United States, United Kingdom, and France ended their decade-long military occupation after World War II.

June 6th, 1966 (6/6/66) was also notable when civil rights activist James Meredith was shot by a sniper in Hernando, Mississippi on his March Against Fear that encouraged voter registration for blacks in the South. Meredith was the first black to attend the University of Mississippi four years previously.

But there truly has been only one date during the last century that can raise the eyebrows of those looking for an 'End of Days'-esque natural event on dates with repetitive numerical patterns.

On November 11, 1911, the Great Blue Norther saw a cold wave strike several Midwestern cities - some of which saw the breaking of both their record high and low temperatures on that same day.

Temperatures in some cities hit the 70s during the day only to fall to the teens and even single digits by nightfall.

But there is no sense in waiting around for an extraordinary event to happen - or even to plan one in advance on dates of numerical interest.

For when the Chicago Cubs scheduled their first ever night game at legendary Wrigley Field on August 8, 1988 (8/8/88), the game was rained out in the 4th inning.

And then there is this following historical note, only somewhat related to U.S. history. On August 8th, 1988, Soviet troops began to withdraw from Afghanistan after a bloody and frustrating conflict that began nearly nine years prior in 1979.

The United States' Operation Enduring Freedom began in Afghanistan a little more than nine years ago as well, with a plan in place to begin withdrawing U.S. troops in July of this year.

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