Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


Pence Seeks First Governorship by Sitting Indiana Congressman Since 1888

Bookmark and Share

A sitting U.S. Representative from Indiana has not won a gubernatorial election in 123 years

He may be the favorite horse in the race, but he's facing long historical odds.

Republican Congressman Mike Pence's (IN-06) announcement on Thursday that he is seeking the governorship of Indiana in 2012 may not have been an unexpected move, but his is not a gubernatorial pathway regularly taken in the Hoosier State.

A Smart Politics historical review of Indiana elections finds that a sitting member of the U.S. House has not been elected governor of Indiana in more than 120 years, when congressman Alvin Hovey won the Election of 1888 to become the state's 21st Governor.

The entrance of the six-term U.S. Representative into the 2012 race will likely put a damper on what could have otherwise been a wide open GOP field had Pence chosen not to run.

But the transition from U.S. Representative to governor is not a well-trodden pathway in Indiana politics.

For example, three-term Republican U.S. House member David McIntosh attempted a run at the governor's mansion in 2000, but failed to beat Democratic incumbent Frank O'Bannon in a 14.9-point defeat.

McIntosh's 41.7 percent tally was the third worst in the history of the Republican Party in an Indiana gubernatorial race, behind only Linley Pearson in 1992 (36.9 percent) and Winfield Durbin in 1912 (22.1 percent) when a Progressive candidate split the anti-Democratic vote (former U.S. Senator Albert Beveridge).

Before McIntosh, it had been 84 years since a sitting congressman from Indiana even made it onto the gubernatorial general election ballot.

In 1916, five-term Democratic U.S. House member John Adair lost by 1.8 points to Republican James Goodrich, winning 46.0 percent of the vote in a plurality-winning race.

Eight years prior, in 1908, six-term Republican U.S. Representative James Watson was defeated by 2.1 points by Democrat Thomas Marshall.

One has to go back 123 years to find the last time Indiana voters gave the nod for their state's chief executive to a member of the U.S. House - and that is because both nominees were sitting congressmen.

Alvin Hovey was a one-term Republican congressman when he won the election of 1888 with a plurality 49.0 percent over another sitting congressman - four-term Democrat Courtland Matson.

Aside from his distinguished military background (ascending to the rank of major general in the Civil War), Hovey had previously been a state supreme court justice, U.S. district attorney, and U.S. Minister to Peru before his short stint in the U.S. House.

The 1888 contest was one of the closest in Indiana history, with Hovey winning by 2,200 votes and just 0.4 points.

Prior to Hovey, two other sitting U.S. Representatives were elected Governor of Indiana during the 19th Century: four-term Democratic-Republican congressman William Hendricks in 1822 and one-term Democratic congressman James Williams in 1876.

(The state's first governor, Jonathan Jennings, was a four-term delegate from the Indiana Territory when he was elected to the first of his two terms as governor in 1816).

Overall, there have been six winning candidacies by sitting or former U.S. House members in Indiana history against more than 20 that have failed.

In addition to sitting congressmen William Hendricks (1822), James Williams (1876), and Alvin Hovey (1888), former members of the U.S. House later elected governor of Indiana are Thomas Hendricks (1872), Albert Porter (1880), and James Hanly (1904).

Hanly, who served one term from Indiana's 9th CD in the mid-1890s, is the last Hoosier State governor to have previously served in the U.S. House.

(Three other former congressmen were appointed territorial governors in the 1800s: Democrat John Davis (of Oregon, by President Pierce), Democrat Willis Gorman (of Minnesota, by Pierce), and Republican Ebenezer Dumont (of Idaho, by President Grant, although dying before taking office)).

Of course, with Indiana a traditionally red state, and with no other big GOP names in the race, Pence is probably wise to attempt to buck Indiana electoral history in 2012.

In fact, the congressman may want to get ready for an eight-year stint in Indianapolis: each of the last five elected governors of the Hoosier state was reelected to a second term: Republicans Doc Bowen (1972, 1976), Robert Orr (1980, 1984), and Mitch Daniels (2004, 2008), and Democrats Evan Bayh (1988, 1992) and Frank O'Bannon (1996, 2000).

Follow Smart Politics on Twitter.

Previous post: A House Divided: A Content Analysis of Congressional Press Releases on the bin Laden Killing
Next post: Joe Donnelly Tries to Pull a Quayle

Leave a comment


Remains of the Data

Who Has Won the Most Votes in US Senate Electoral History?

Only three of the Top 10 and nine of the Top 50 vote-getters of all time are currently serving in the chamber.

Political Crumbs

Six for Thirteen

Collin Peterson remarked last month that he is leaning to run for reelection to Minnesota's 7th Congressional District in 2016. If he does and is victorious, he will creep even closer to the top of the list of the longest-serving U.S. Representatives in Minnesota history. The DFL congressman is only the sixth Minnesotan to win at least 13 terms to the U.S. House of the 135 elected to the chamber in state history. Peterson trails 18-term DFLer Jim Oberstar (1975-2011), 16-term Republicans Harold Knutson (1917-1949) and August Andresen (1925-1933; 1935-1958), and 14-term DFLers Martin Sabo (1979-2007) and John Blatnik (1947-1974). Andresen died in office, Sabo and Blatnik retired, and Knutson and Oberstar were defeated at the ballot box in 1948 and 2010 respectively. At 70 years, 7 months, 11 days through Monday, Peterson is currently the ninth oldest Gopher State U.S. Representative in history. DFLer Rick Nolan of the 8th CD is the seventh oldest at 71 years, 1 month, 23 days.


Seeing Red

Congressman Nick Rahall's failed bid for a 20th term in West Virginia this cycle, combined with a narrow loss by Nick Casey to Alex Mooney in Shelley Moore Capito's open seat, means that West Virginia Democrats will be shut out of the state's U.S. House delegation for the first time in over 90 years. The Republican sweep by two-term incumbent David McKinley in the 1st CD, Mooney in the 2nd, and Evan Jenkins over Rahall in the 3rd marks the first time the GOP has held all seats in the chamber from West Virginia since the Election of 1920. During the 67th Congress (1921-1923) all six seats from the state were controlled by the GOP. Since the Election of 1922, Democrats have won 76 percent of all U.S. House elections in the Mountain State - capturing 172 seats compared to 54 for the GOP.


more POLITICAL CRUMBS

Humphrey School Sites
CSPG
Humphrey New Media Hub

Issues />

<div id=
Abortion
Afghanistan
Budget and taxes
Campaign finances
Crime and punishment
Economy and jobs
Education
Energy
Environment
Foreign affairs
Gender
Health
Housing
Ideology
Immigration
Iraq
Media
Military
Partisanship
Race and ethnicity
Reapportionment
Redistricting
Religion
Sexuality
Sports
Terrorism
Third parties
Transportation
Voting