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Ex-Pawlenty Supporter Hubbard Has Given Thousands to Bachmann (and Democrats) Over the Years

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The Hubbard Broadcasting head and his wife have donated significantly to Michele Bachmann and Democratic candidates over recent election cycles

michelebachmann08.jpgFormer Tim Pawlenty for President supporter and Hubbard Broadcasting CEO Stanley Hubbard announced Tuesday that he would now support Michele Bachmann for her GOP presidential nomination bid.

But it should not be too surprising that the Lakeland, Minnesota billionaire would turn so quickly to the Bachmann camp now that Pawlenty is out of the race.

Nor should much be made of any financial support he puts in her coffers going forward.

A Smart Politics review of FEC fundraising data finds Stanley Hubbard and his wife Karen gave significant contributions to Michele Bachmann's congressional campaigns in the 2006, 2008, and 2010 cycles, with $25,000 in donations during this three-cycle span.

But the Hubbards - like many über wealthy individuals, and particularly those with business interests - spread their wealth around, across candidates and parties.

The duo have contributed to numerous federal campaigns over the past decade, including many competitors from the same party vying for the same office, as well as to dozens of Democrats.

For example, in the 2008 presidential election, Stanley Hubbard donated to the campaigns of Republicans Mitt Romney, Rudy Giuliani, and John McCain as well as Democratic candidate Bill Richardson.

Stanley Hubbard even gave $1,000 to Al Gore during his 2000 presidential campaign.

In Minnesota's 2008 3rd CD contest, both DFLer Terri Bonoff and Republican Erik Paulsen each received money from the media mogul as they sought to win Jim Ramstad's seat.

But the Hubbards have had a Republican tilt in their campaign contributions.

For example, in 2010, each of the Hubbards backed controversial Tea Party U.S. Senate candidates such as Joe Miller in Alaska and Christine O'Donnell in Delaware as well as successful GOP U.S. Senate candidates like Ron Johnson in Wisconsin and Kelly Ayotte in New Hampshire.

Still, over the past decade the Hubbards have also donated to dozens of Democratic candidates, including:

· Nevada U.S. Senator and Majority Leader Harry Reid
· Massachusetts U.S. Senator John Kerry
· Minnesota U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar
· North Dakota U.S. Senator Kent Conrad
· South Dakota U.S. Senator Tim Johnson
· New Mexico U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman
· New Mexico U.S. Senator Tom Udall (while a U.S. Representative)
· Former Connecticut U.S. Senator Chris Dodd
· Former Florida U.S. Senator Bob Graham
· Former North Dakota U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan
· Former Nebraska U.S. Senator Bob Kerrey
· Former Minnesota U.S. Senator (and current governor) Mark Dayton
· Massachusetts U.S. Representative Ed Markey
· Michigan U.S. Representative John Dingell
· Former Minnesota U.S. Representative Jim Oberstar
· Former Minnesota U.S. Representative Martin Sabo
· Former Minnesota U.S. Representative David Minge
· Former Minnesota U.S. Representative Bill Luther

So while the Bachmann campaign may appreciate the public backing Stanley Hubbard has given her campaign, scratching the surface of the mogul's past campaign contributions suggests his funding is more about getting access to candidates across the political spectrum and less about any individual candidate's political party or ideology.

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