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Candidate Code Names: Fun with Anagrams and the 2012 Republican Field

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Would Barack Obama rather run against "Metro Minty," "Ethnic Wronging," or "Cranium Stork?"

newtgingrich10.jpgAlthough they may fall short of being usable slogans for their respective campaigns, the names of the four remaining Republican presidential candidates do offer up several entertaining anagrams.

In fact, one wonders if Barack Obama's opposition research team has already chambered some of these phrases for pins, bumper stickers, or television advertisements, depending on which candidate emerges as his 2012 opponent...

Anagrams for Mitt Romney:
Metro Minty
Memory Tint
Trim Toy Men
Try Not Mime

Or, better yet, using his birth name, Willard Romney:
Normally Weird
Morally Rewind
New Miry Dollar
My Warlord Lien
Wiry Amen Droll

For Rick Santorum (excluding those anagrams that are not suitable for publishing):

Cranium Stork
Iran Must Rock
Romantic Rusk
No Racist Murk
Run Smack Trio
Crank Tourism
Ink Scar Tumor

Newt Gingrich is not fertile soil, but Newton Gingrich is:

Ethnic Wronging
Right Wing Nonce
Oh Cringing Newt
We Right Conning
Wince Thronging
Rich Gent Owning

Ron Paul, meanwhile, escapes without much damage:

Our Plan
Lunar Op
Oral Pun

But Ronald Paul does not:

Undo All Rap
A Dollar Pun
A Dull Apron

As for which, if any, of these anagrams will catch on, no doubt some pro-Obama Café Press store will offer similarly-themed t-shirts, mugs, and more in the coming months...

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