Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


The Walker Effect? Wisconsin Ranks Dead Last in Donations to 2012 GOP Field

Bookmark and Share

Utah, Connecticut, and Texas lead the way in large donor per capita contributions to Republican presidential candidates with Wisconsin, Arkansas, and Indiana at the bottom

wisconsinseal10.pngDespite nine of the state's last 11 presidential elections being decided by single digits - with Republicans winning four of them - Republican presidential candidates are not having any luck getting residents in the perennial battleground state of Wisconsin to open up their pocketbooks to help fund their campaigns.

In the 2008 cycle, Wisconsin ranked #44 in per capita giving to the Republican presidential field, ahead of only Iowa, Hawaii, Kentucky, North Dakota, Indiana, and West Virginia.

And now the Badger State has fallen to the bottom of the pack.

A Smart Politics analysis of FEC data finds that Wisconsin is the lowest ranking state in per capita large donor campaign contributions to 2012 Republican candidates.

At just $529,280 through the end of December 2011, Wisconsinites have contributed only $93.07 per 1,000 residents to the GOP field - just below Arkansas at $93.10.

Wisconsin's rate of large donor giving to Republicans is more than three times below the national average of $339.59 per 1,000 residents.

Other low-ranking states are North Carolina at $121.27 (#46), Delaware at $119.58 (#47), and Indiana at $114.71 (#48).

Wisconsin's battleground state neighbors in the Midwest have given significantly more money to the various Republican candidates thus far:

· Minnesota - buoyed in part by two homegrown (ex-) candidates - comes in at #16 at $335.66 per 1,000 residents, or a 261 percent higher amount of giving.

· Michigan ranks #26 at $231.86 per 1,000 residents, or a 149 percent higher rate than Wisconsin.

· Iowa - home to the party's most famous straw poll and the first caucus of the season - ranks at #34 with $180.00 per 1,000 residents, or 93 percent higher than Wisconsin.

Overall, Midwesterners are not the most generous lot in giving to Republican candidates.

No Midwestern state ranks even in the Top 15 in per capita large donor contributions to the GOP field this cycle (with Minnesota the highest at #16).

And what states lead the nation in giving to the GOP?

Utah is at the top of the pack, giving at a rate of $1,042 per 1,000 residents, with the field's two Mormon candidates Mitt Romney and Jon Huntsman receiving 93.3 percent of these funds.

Utah ranked #2 in large donor contributions to Republican presidential candidates for the 2008 cycle behind only Virginia.

Coming in at #2 in 2012 is the deep blue state of Connecticut at $759.93 per 1,000 residents. Connecticut ranked third for the 2008 cycle in large donor money to GOPers.

Texas jumped up seven slots from #10 in 2008 to #3 in 2012 due in significant part to Governor Rick Perry running for the White House this year.

A total of 60.6 percent of large donor contributions to the GOP field from Texans went to Perry ($10.8 million out of $17.9 million) with another 8.4 percent directed to local Congressman Ron Paul ($1.5 million).

Rounding out the Top 10 are Wyoming at #4, Massachusetts at #5, Nevada at #6, New Hampshire at #7, New York at #8, Florida at #9, and Virginia at #10.

Wisconsin's bottom of the barrel ranking in contributions to Republican candidates belies its battleground state status mentioned above as well as its middle-of-the-road ranking in median household income (at #21, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, it is not a poor state).

And it's not as if Wisconsinites aren't giving - in some measure - to political candidates.

In the 2008 cycle, Wisconsin ranked #32 in large donor contributions to the Democratic presidential candidates.

This cycle, the Badger State ranks #33 in such campaign donations to President Obama (and at a 10 percent higher clip than contributions to the Republican field).

Wisconsin, like many states in 2010, took a decided turn to the right with Republicans taking control of the governor's mansion, State Senate, and State Assembly, and picking off one U.S. Senate and two U.S. House seats.

Since then, Governor Scott Walker has become a lightning rod public figure and is in real danger of being recalled in a few months.

While Wisconsin's recent track record suggests it has not been generous in funding GOP candidates generally, one wonders if the Republican brand may have been damaged at the margin's by the state's firebrand governor with a carry-over effect on the 2012 presidential race.

Large Donor Per Capita Contributions to 2012 Republican Candidates by State

2012
2008
State
Amount*
Population
Per 1,000
1
2
Utah
$2,882,693
2,763,885
$1,042.99
2
3
Connecticut
$2,716,053
3,574,097
$759.93
3
10
Texas
$17,914,332
25,145,561
$712.43
4
6
Wyoming
$350,844
563,626
$622.48
5
9
Massachusetts
$3,966,464
6,547,629
$605.79
6
5
Nevada
$1,322,205
2,700,551
$489.61
7
11
New Hampshire
$640,812
1,316,470
$486.77
8
8
New York
$9,065,482
19,378,102
$467.82
9
7
Florida
$8,406,637
18,801,310
$447.13
10
1
Virginia
$3,458,274
8,001,024
$432.23
11
16
Idaho
$583,577
1,567,582
$372.28
12
15
New Jersey
$3,186,061
8,791,894
$362.39
13
20
Georgia
$3,408,363
9,687,653
$351.83
14
13
California
$12,633,574
37,253,956
$339.12
15
24
Louisiana
$1,531,825
4,533,372
$337.90
16
32
Minnesota
$1,780,301
5,303,925
$335.66
17
14
Colorado
$1,659,139
5,029,196
$329.90
18
4
Arizona
$2,031,413
6,392,017
$317.80
19
12
Tennessee
$1,945,725
6,346,105
$306.60
20
31
South Dakota
$236,841
814,180
$290.90
21
21
Oklahoma
$1,081,800
3,751,351
$288.38
22
17
Maryland
$1,584,142
5,773,552
$274.38
23
19
Illinois
$3,469,266
12,830,632
$270.39
24
22
Missouri
$1,595,035
5,988,927
$266.33
25
28
Alaska
$185,132
710,231
$260.66
26
26
Michigan
$2,291,656
9,883,640
$231.86
27
37
Montana
$210,036
989,415
$212.28
28
29
Washington
$1,388,128
6,724,540
$206.43
29
35
Pennsylvania
$2,562,876
12,702,379
$201.76
30
39
Rhode Island
$205,405
1,052,567
$195.15
31
30
New Mexico
$386,918
2,059,179
$187.90
32
40
Nebraska
$333,478
1,826,341
$182.59
33
38
Oregon
$695,225
3,831,074
$181.47
34
45
Iowa
$548,349
3,046,355
$180.00
35
50
West Virginia
$333,409
1,852,994
$179.93
36
23
Kansas
$479,634
2,853,118
$168.11
37
41
Vermont
$103,279
625,741
$165.05
38
18
South Carolina
$743,252
4,625,364
$160.69
39
33
Mississippi
$464,889
2,967,297
$156.67
40
48
North Dakota
$99,573
672,591
$148.04
41
47
Kentucky
$638,718
4,339,367
$147.19
42
27
Ohio
$1,686,608
11,536,504
$146.20
43
46
Hawaii
$198,059
1,360,301
$145.60
44
36
Alabama
$648,759
4,779,736
$135.73
45
42
Maine
$178,677
1,328,361
$134.51
46
43
North Carolina
$1,156,377
9,535,483
$121.27
47
34
Delaware
$107,375
897,934
$119.58
48
49
Indiana
$743,755
6,483,802
$114.71
49
25
Arkansas
$271,473
2,915,918
$93.10
50
44
Wisconsin
$529,280
5,686,986
$93.07
 
 
Total
$104,641,178
308,143,815
$339.59
*Through Q4 2011. Table compiled by Smart Politics with FEC and U.S. Census Bureau data.

Follow Smart Politics on Twitter.

Previous post: Ron Paul Outraising Mitt Romney in 10 States
Next post: Minnesota Caucuses: Paul Reaches Record High, Romney Nears Record Low

Leave a comment


Remains of the Data

Which States Have the Longest and Shortest Election Day Voting Hours?

Residents in some North Dakota towns have less than half as many hours to cast their ballots as those in New York State.

Political Crumbs

No 100-Year Curse for Roberts

Defeating his Tea Party primary challenger Milton Wolf with just 48.1 percent of the vote, Pat Roberts narrowly escaped becoming the first elected U.S. Senator from Kansas to lose a renomination bid in 100 years. The last - and so far only - elected U.S. Senator to lose a Kansas primary was one-term Republican Joseph Bristow in 1914. Bristow was defeated by former U.S. Senator Charles Curtis who went on to win three terms before becoming Herbert Hoover's running mate in 1928. Only one other U.S. Senator from the Sunflower State has lost a primary since the passage of the 17th Amendment: Sheila Frahm in 1996. Frahm was appointed to fill Bob Dole's seat earlier that year and finished 13.2 points behind Sam Brownback in the three-candidate primary field. Overall, incumbent senators from Kansas have won 29 times against two defeats in the direct vote era. (Curtis also lost a primary in 1912 to Walter Stubbs, one year before the nation moved to direct elections).


The Second Time Around

Former Republican Congressman Bob Beauprez became the seventh major party or second place gubernatorial candidate in Colorado to get a second chance at the office when he narrowly won his party's nomination last month. Two of the previous six candidates were successful. Democrat Alva Adams lost his first gubernatorial bid to Benjamin Eaton in 1884, but was victorious two years later against William Meyer. Democrat Charles Johnson placed third in 1894 behind Republican Albert McIntyre and Populist incumbent Governor David Waite but returned as the Fusion (Democrat/Populist) nominee in 1898 and defeated GOPer Henry Wolcott. Gubernatorial candidates who received a second chance but lost both general elections include Democrat Thomas Patterson (1888, 1914), Progressive Edward Costigan (1912, 1914), Republican Donald Brotzman (1954, 1956), and Republican David Strickland (1978, 1986).


more POLITICAL CRUMBS

Humphrey School Sites
CSPG
Humphrey New Media Hub

Issues />

<div id=
Abortion
Afghanistan
Budget and taxes
Campaign finances
Crime and punishment
Economy and jobs
Education
Energy
Environment
Foreign affairs
Gender
Health
Housing
Ideology
Immigration
Iraq
Media
Military
Partisanship
Race and ethnicity
Reapportionment
Redistricting
Religion
Sexuality
Sports
Terrorism
Third parties
Transportation
Voting