Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


RNC: No Rick Scott, No Problem

Bookmark and Share

National political conventions have been frequently held in states in which the sitting governor does not attend (though usually a governor from the opposing party)

rickscott10.jpgRick Scott's decision to withdraw from the Republican National Convention's activities including his scheduled speech Monday evening due to the severe weather hitting his state of Florida leaves the convention without any presence by its host state's governor.

While that is unusual in recent GOP convention history, it has not been a requirement that the governor of the convention state attends or receives a featured speech at the proceedings.

In fact, many convention locales have been in states with governors from the opposing political party - including eventual opposing presidential nominees.

A Smart Politics analysis of Republican and Democratic National Conventions finds that only two-thirds of such conventions have been held in states with a sitting governor of their own party (58 of 86).

Republicans have held their last five conventions in states governed by Republicans: California in 1996 (Pete Wilson), Pennsylvania in 2000 (Tom Ridge), New York in 2004 (George Pataki), Minnesota in 2008 (Tim Pawlenty), and Florida this August (Rick Scott).

Ridge, Pataki, and Pawlenty all spoke on the last day of their state's respective convention.

However, during six of the 11 cycles over the previous 40 years (1952-1992), the Republican Party held conventions in states with sitting Democratic governors:

· 1952: Illinois (Chicago) with Adlai Stevenson.
· 1964: California (San Francisco) with Pat Brown.
· 1972: Florida (Miami Beach) with Reubin Askew.
· 1984: Texas (Dallas) with Mark White.
· 1988: Louisiana (New Orleans) with Buddy Roemer.
· 1992: Texas (Houston) with Ann Richards.

Stevenson, of course, became the Democratic nominee on the third ballot in the same building in Chicago two weeks after the Republican convention adjourned.

Overall, since the GOP's first national convention in Pennsylvania in June 1856, there have been 29 Republican host state governors (72.5 percent) and members of another political party for 11 other cycles (27.5 percent).

Another historically prominent host state governor during the RNC is Rutherford Hayes.

Hayes had just started his third term as the chief executive of Ohio when he was nominated for president on the seventh ballot at the 1876 convention in Cincinnati.

Hayes would be elected president just a few months later by one Electoral College vote over Samuel Tilden.

The Democratic Party, meanwhile, has held its national convention in states with Republican governors during two of the last five cycles: Illinois (Chicago) in 1996 (Jim Edgar) and Massachusetts (Boston) in 2004 (Mitt Romney).

Romney joins Adlai Stevenson (Illinois, 1952) and Al Smith (New York, 1928) as governors of Democratic National Convention host states who have gone on to secure their party's presidential nomination.

Overall, Democrats have governed states hosting the DNC just 61 percent of the time (28 of 46 cycles since 1828), with Republicans governing 33 percent of the time (15 cycles) and other parties for the remaining three cycles.

Note: If the GOP is looking to get a boost in Florida this cycle as part of its convention-site strategy, history suggests they may be disappointed.

Republican presidential nominees have averaged a 1-point decline in convention host state's adjusted margin of victory (or loss) vis-à-vis the national vote compared to the previous election cycle since the first televised convention in 1940.

Convention locations aside, a previous Smart Politics study found there to be no correlation between a state's presidential vote and gubernatorial partisan control.

Since 1968, Democratic presidential candidates have had the same success rate in carrying states with Democratic governors as Republican governors - one-third of the time.

Republican presidential nominees also carried states with GOP governors (67 percent) at essentially the same rate as Democratic governors (65 percent) during this 40-year span.

National Democratic and Republican Convention Host State Governor by Cycle, 1836-2012

Year
Convention
City
State
Host Governor
Party
2012
Democratic
Charlotte
NC
Beverly Perdue
Democrat
2012
Republican
Tampa
FL
Rick Scott
Republican
2008
Democratic
Denver
CO
Bill Ritter
Democrat
2008
Republican
St. Paul
MN
Tim Pawlenty
Republican
2004
Democratic
Boston
MA
Mitt Romney
Republican
2004
Republican
New York
NY
George Pataki
Republican
2000
Democratic
Los Angeles
CA
Gray Davis
Democrat
2000
Republican
Philadelphia
PA
Tom Ridge
Republican
1996
Democratic
Chicago
IL
Jim Edgar
Republican
1996
Republican
San Diego
CA
Pete Wilson
Republican
1992
Democratic
New York
NY
Mario Cuomo
Democrat
1992
Republican
Houston
TX
Ann Richards
Democrat
1988
Democratic
Atlanta
GA
Joe Harris
Democrat
1988
Republican
New Orleans
LA
Buddy Roemer
Democrat
1984
Democratic
San Francisco
CA
George Deukmejian
Republican
1984
Republican
Dallas
TX
Mark White
Democrat
1980
Democratic
New York
NY
Hugh Carey
Democrat
1980
Republican
Detroit
MI
William Millikan
Republican
1976
Democratic
New York
NY
Hugh Carey
Democrat
1976
Republican
Kansas City
MO
Kit Bond
Republican
1972
Democratic
Miami Beach
FL
Reubin Askew
Democrat
1972
Republican
Miami Beach
FL
Reubin Askew
Democrat
1968
Democratic
Chicago
IL
Samuel Shapiro
Democrat
1968
Republican
Miami Beach
FL
Claude Kirk
Republican
1964
Democratic
Atlantic City
NJ
Richard Hughes
Democrat
1964
Republican
San Francisco
CA
Pat Brown
Democrat
1960
Democratic
Los Angeles
CA
Pat Brown
Democrat
1960
Republican
Chicago
IL
William Stratton
Republican
1956
Democratic
Chicago
IL
William Stratton
Republican
1956
Republican
San Francisco
CA
Goodwin Knight
Republican
1952
Democratic
Chicago
IL
Adlai Stevenson
Democrat
1952
Republican
Chicago
IL
Adlai Stevenson
Democrat
1948
Democratic
Philadelphia
PA
James Duff
Republican
1948
Republican
Philadelphia
PA
James Duff
Republican
1944
Democratic
Chicago
IL
Dwight Green
Republican
1944
Republican
Chicago
IL
Dwight Green
Republican
1940
Democratic
Chicago
IL
Henry Horner
Democrat
1940
Republican
Philadelphia
PA
Arthur James
Republican
1936
Democratic
Philadelphia
PA
George Earle
Democrat
1936
Republican
Cleveland
OH
Martin Davey
Democrat
1932
Democratic
Chicago
IL
Louis Emmerson
Republican
1932
Republican
Chicago
IL
Louis Emmerson
Republican
1928
Democratic
Houston
TX
Dan Moody
Democrat
1928
Republican
Kansas City
MO
Samuel Baker
Republican
1924
Democratic
New York
NY
Al Smith
Democrat
1924
Republican
Cleveland
OH
Victor Donahey
Democrat
1920
Democratic
San Francisco
CA
William Stephens
Republican
1920
Republican
Chicago
IL
Frank Lowden
Republican
1916
Democratic
St. Louis
MO
Elliot Major
Democrat
1916
Republican
Chicago
IL
Edward Dunne
Democrat
1912
Democratic
Baltimore
MD
Philips Goldsborough
Republican
1912
Republican
Chicago
IL
Charles Deneen
Republican
1908
Democratic
Denver
CO
Henry Buchtel
Republican
1908
Republican
Chicago
IL
Charles Deneen
Republican
1904
Democratic
St. Louis
MO
Alexander Dockery
Democrat
1904
Republican
Chicago
IL
Richard Yates
Republican
1900
Democratic
Kansas City
MO
Lawrence Stephens
Democrat
1900
Republican
Philadelphia
PA
William A. Stone
Republican
1896
Democratic
Chicago
IL
John Altgeld
Democrat
1896
Republican
St. Louis
MO
William J. Stone
Democrat
1892
Democratic
Chicago
IL
Joseph Fifer
Republican
1892
Republican
Minneapolis
MN
William Merriam
Republican
1888
Democratic
St. Louis
MO
Albert Morehouse
Democrat
1888
Republican
Chicago
IL
Richard Oglesby
Republican
1884
Democratic
Chicago
IL
John Hamilton
Republican
1884
Republican
Chicago
IL
John Hamilton
Republican
1880
Democratic
Cincinnati
OH
Charles Foster
Republican
1880
Republican
Chicago
IL
Shelby Cullom
Republican
1876
Democratic
St. Louis
MO
Charles Hardin
Democrat
1876
Republican
Cincinnati
OH
Rutherford Hayes
Republican
1872
Democratic
Baltimore
MD
William Whyte
Democrat
1872
Republican
Philadelphia
PA
John Geary
Republican
1868
Democratic
New York
NY
Reuben Fenton
Republican
1868
Republican
Chicago
IL
Richard Oglesby
Republican
1864
Democratic
Chicago
IL
Richard Yates
Republican
1864
Republican
Baltimore
MD
Augustus Bradford
Union (Republican)
1860
Democratic
Baltimore
MD
Thomas Hicks
American
1860
Republican
Chicago
IL
John Wood
Republican
1856
Democratic
Charleston
SC
James Adams
Democrat
1856
Republican
Philadelphia
PA
James Pollock
Whig
1852
Democratic
Cincinnati
OH
Reuben Wood
Democrat
1848
Democratic
Baltimore
MD
Philip Thomas
Democrat
1844
Democratic
Baltimore
MD
Francis Thomas
Democrat
1840
Democratic
Baltimore
MD
William Grason
Democrat
1836
Democratic
Baltimore
MD
Thomas Veazey
Whig
1832
Democratic
Baltimore
MD
George Howard
Nat'l Republican
Table compiled by Smart Politics.

Follow Smart Politics on Twitter.

Previous post: Vote R & R in 2012?
Next post: Changing Tides? GOP Eyes Rare Majority Control of Upper Midwest Senate Delegation

1 Comment


  • AS a Floridian I can tell you I thought Jeb Bush was the worst Governor we ever had but seeing Rick Scott in action I'm wrong Rick Scott has been the worst. As for the RNC convention in Tampa Fl. I can tell you driving on Dale Mabry Hwy. the Strip Clubs were overflowing parking lots. But what was scray was the Big Parties mostly Insurance companies CEO's not including Investment Bankers Here and oversea UK ect. If you are on Medicare,Medicaid and Romney.Ryan get elected you can kiss you Medicare/Medicaid GOOD BYE. Vote (Democratic) if you like Medicare as is.

  • Leave a comment


    Remains of the Data

    Gender Equality in the US House: A State-by State Quarter-Century Report Card (1989-2014)

    A study of 5,325 congressional elections finds the number of female U.S. Representatives has more than tripled over the last 25 years, but the rate at which women are elected to the chamber still varies greatly between the states.

    Political Crumbs

    Small Club in St. Paul

    Mark Dayton is one of just three Minnesotans ever elected to three different statewide offices. Dayton, of course, had previously served as State Auditor (1991-1995) and U.S. Senator (2001-2007) before winning the governorship in 2010. At that time, he joined Republicans Edward Thye and J.A.A. Burnquist on this very short list. Burnquist was elected lieutenant governor in 1914 but then became governor after the death of Democrat Winfield Hammond in 1915. He then won the gubernatorial elections of 1916 and 1918 and eight terms as attorney general two decades later (1939-1955). Thye was similarly first elected lieutenant governor of the Gopher State and became governor after the resignation of fellow GOPer Harold Stasson in 1943. Thye won one additional full term as governor in 1944 and then two terms to the U.S. Senate (1947-1959). Twenty Minnesotans have been elected to two different statewide offices.


    Respect Your Elders?

    With retirement announcements this year by veteran U.S. Representatives such as 30-term Democrat John Dingell of Michigan, 20-term Democrat George Miller of California, and 18-term Republican Tom Petri of Wisconsin, it is no surprise that retirees from the 113th Congress are one of the most experienced cohorts in recent decades. Overall, these 24 exiting members of the House have served an average of 11.0 terms - the second longest tenure among retirees across the last 18 cycles since 1980. Only the U.S. Representatives retiring in 2006 had more experience, averaging 11.9 terms. (In that cycle, 10 of the 11 retiring members served at least 10 terms, with GOPer Bill Jenkins of Tennessee the lone exception at just five). Even without the aforementioned Dingell, the average length of service in the chamber of the remaining 23 retirees in 2014 is 10.2 terms - which would still be the third highest since 1980 behind the 2006 and 2012 (10.5 terms) cycles.


    more POLITICAL CRUMBS

    Humphrey School Sites
    CSPG
    Humphrey New Media Hub

    Issues />

<div id=
    Abortion
    Afghanistan
    Budget and taxes
    Campaign finances
    Crime and punishment
    Economy and jobs
    Education
    Energy
    Environment
    Foreign affairs
    Gender
    Health
    Housing
    Ideology
    Immigration
    Iraq
    Media
    Military
    Partisanship
    Race and ethnicity
    Reapportionment
    Redistricting
    Religion
    Sexuality
    Sports
    Terrorism
    Third parties
    Transportation
    Voting