Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


All-Republican US Senate Delegation Wait Continues in Florida, Wisconsin, North Dakota

Bookmark and Share

The three states have not been represented by two Republicans in the U.S. Senate for a combined 244 years and counting

debfischer10.jpgWhen the 113th Congress convenes in early January, the State of Nebraska will have two Republicans serving in the U.S. Senate for the first time since December 1976.

Deb Fischer easily defeated former two-term Democrat Bob Kerrey last week to join Mike Johanns for the Cornhusker State's first GOP duo in the nation's upper legislative chamber since Roman Hruska and Carl Curtis 36 years ago.

Of the 50 states, Nebraska had held the 18th longest period since the last time it sent two Republicans to the U.S. Senate.

Perhaps the most surprising turn came in North Dakota, where Democrat Heidi Heitkamp edged GOP U.S. Representative Rick Berg by 0.9 points.

North Dakota had an opportunity to send two Republicans to the U.S. Senate for the first time since August 1960 when Milton Young and Clarence Brunsdale served in the chamber.

But Berg's loss means the state with the nation's 12th longest gap will be without an all-Republican delegation to the U.S. Senate for at least another six years.

The Heitkamp-Berg battle was actually only the fourth closest U.S. Senate race in state history behind Republican Milton Young's win in 1974 by 0.1 points over William Guy, Democrat Quentin Burdick's special election victory by 0.5 points in 1960 over John Davis, and Democrat Kent Conrad's win in 1986 by 0.7 points over incumbent Mark Andrews.

Wisconsin was another state where the Republican Party had high hopes, aiming to pick off seats in back-to-back cycles after Ron Johnson defeated three-term Democrat Russ Feingold in 2010.

But seven-term U.S. Representative Tammy Baldwin handed former four-term Governor Tommy Thompson a 5.6-point loss to prevent the GOP from landing both seats in the chamber.

Wisconsin thus retains its hold on the seventh longest period in the nation without both of its U.S. Senate seats claimed by Republicans.

The last time two Republicans held both seats was more than 55 years ago just before Joe McCarthy's death in May 1957 when he and Alexander Wiley represented the Badger State.

Meanwhile, the Democratic hold on political power in the South has slowly faded away in federal and state elections over the last 48 years since the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

But in Florida, the Republican Party has yet to be able to pry away both U.S. Senate seats from the Democrats during this period.

Last week two-term Democrat Bill Nelson cruised to a 12.8-point victory over congressman Connie Mack, extending the nation's second longest stretch for a state being represented by no more than one Republican.

It has been 137 years since the last time Florida had two GOP U.S. Senators when Abijah Gilbert and Simon Conover served the state in March 1875.

Florida may hold the nation's longest such streak after 2014 when Democrat Mary Landrieu is up for reelection in the deep red state of Louisiana.

One has to go back to January 1872 to find the last time Louisiana had two Republican U.S. Senators.

Rounding out the Top 10 are Arkansas at #3 (March 1885), Montana at #4 (March 1911), Rhode Island at #5 (January 1935), Massachusetts at #6 (January 1953), Michigan at #7 (January 1955), West Virginia at #9 (November 1958), and Connecticut and New Jersey tied for #10 (January 1959).

Two states that are currently represented by two Republicans in the U.S. Senate will lose that distinction in January when Democrat Joe Donnelly and Independent Angus King are seated from Indiana and Maine respectively.

Follow Smart Politics on Twitter.

Previous post: Democrats Amass 144 Consecutive US House Victories in Four Northeastern States
Next post: Death of the Battlegrounds? The 2012 Election in History

Leave a comment


Remains of the Data

Gender Equality in the US House: A State-by State Quarter-Century Report Card (1989-2014)

A study of 5,325 congressional elections finds the number of female U.S. Representatives has more than tripled over the last 25 years, but the rate at which women are elected to the chamber still varies greatly between the states.

Political Crumbs

Final Four Has Presidential Approval

By edging Michigan in the final seconds Sunday, the University of Kentucky guaranteed that one school in the Final Four this year would be located in a state that was not carried by President Barack Obama in 2012. (Connecticut, Florida, and Wisconsin had previously earned Final Four slots over the weekend). Across the 76 Final Fours since 1939, an average of 3.1 schools have been located in states won by the president's ticket during the previous election cycle. All four schools have come from states won by the president 29 times, with the most recent being the 2009 Final Four featuring Connecticut, Michigan State, North Carolina, and Villanova. On 30 occasions three Final Four schools have been located in states won by the president, with two schools 11 times and only one school six times (the most recent being 2012 with Kansas, Kentucky, Louisville, and Ohio State). There has never been a Men's NCAA Division I Final Four in which no schools were located in states carried by the president's ticket.


Three for the Road

A new Rasmussen Poll shows Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker in a dead heat with likely 2014 Democratic nominee Mary Burke. Walker is seeking to win his third consecutive election after prevailing in 2012's recall contest. Eight of his predecessors accomplished this feat: Republicans Lucius Fairchild (in 1869), Jeremiah Rusk (1886), Robert La Follette (1904), Emanuel Philipp (1918), John Blaine (1924), Walter Kohler (1954), Warren Knowles (1968), and Tommy Thompson (1994). Three others Badger State governors lost on their third campaign: Democrat George Peck (1894), Progressive Philip La Follette (1938), and Republican Julius Heil (1942). One died in office before having the opportunity to win a third contest (GOPer Walter Goodland in 1947) while another resigned beforehand (Democrat Patrick Lucey in 1977 to become Ambassador to Mexico). Overall Wisconsin gubernatorial incumbents have won 35 of 47 general election contests, or 74.5 percent of the time.


more POLITICAL CRUMBS

Humphrey School Sites
CSPG
Humphrey New Media Hub

Issues />

<div id=
Abortion
Afghanistan
Budget and taxes
Campaign finances
Crime and punishment
Economy and jobs
Education
Energy
Environment
Foreign affairs
Gender
Health
Housing
Ideology
Immigration
Iraq
Media
Military
Partisanship
Race and ethnicity
Reapportionment
Redistricting
Religion
Sexuality
Sports
Terrorism
Third parties
Transportation
Voting