Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


Are Eric Holder's Days Numbered?

Bookmark and Share

The 82nd Attorney General already has the ninth longest tenure of any AG in U.S. history

ericholder10.jpgEric Holder has endured his fair share of critics throughout his tenure as the 82nd Attorney General of the United States, but had to face another high-profile round of grilling Wednesday before the House Judiciary Committee to discuss a variety of issues including the latest scandal related to the subpoena of Associated Press phone records.

Although some Republicans, such as RNC Chair Reince Priebus, have called for Holder's resignation, there is no sign yet that the current situation has risen to the level of President Obama calling on Holder to resign.

The turnover of Obama's cabinet, while historically low during his first term, has accelerated in recent months with Hillary Clinton, Tim Geithner, Leon Panetta, Ken Salazar, Hilda Solis, and Steven Chu all departing their posts this year.

In addition to Holder, original cabinet secretaries Tom Vilsack (Agriculture), Kathleen Sebelius (Health and Human Services), Arne Duncan (Education), Shaun Donovan (Housing and Urban Development), Ray LaHood (Transportation), Eric Shinseki (Veterans' Affairs), and Janet Napolitano (Homeland Security) still remain in office.

Will Holder be the next to leave?

Through Thursday, Holder has now been in office 1,564 days (4 years, 3 months, 14 days) which is historically a very long time for the nation's Attorney General.

Holder currently claims the ninth longest tenure among the 82 individuals to hold the post in the nation's history and the fifth longest since the turn of the 20th Century.

William Wirt holds a record that will likely never be broken at 11 years, 3 months, and 16 days - spanning most of the James Monroe administration as well as the entirety of John Quincy Adams'.

Wirt was later the presidential nominee of the Anti-Masonic Party in 1832 and won 7.8 percent of the vote and carried the State of Vermont.

Janet Reno - the only woman to hold the post - has the second longest service record at 7 years, 10 months, and 8 days during the Clinton administration.

Reno followed that up with a failed Florida gubernatorial Democratic primary bid in 2002.

Wirt and Reno are the only two Attorney Generals to serve at least six years in office, a feat Holder would accomplish on February 3, 2015 should he last that long.

If Holder remains in office until the end of the year, he would climb into fifth place all-time, behind only FDR's first AG, Homer Cummings (5 years, 9 months, 29 days) and the nation's 3rd AG Charles Lee (5 years, 2 months, 22 days).

Along the way Holder would pass Wilson AG Thomas Gregory (4 years, 6 months, 1 day), Jackson/Van Buren AG Benjamin Butler (4 years, 9 months, 13 days), Eisenhower AG Herbert Brownell (4 years, 9 months, 18 days), and Jefferson/Madison AG Caesar Rodney (4 years, 10 months, 15 days) .

Holder will next pass Gregory for 8th place on August 5, 2013.

Top 10 Longest Serving U.S. Attorney Generals

Rank
#
Attorney General
Presidency
Years
Months
Days
1
9
William Wirt
Monroe, J.Q. Adams
11
3
16
2
78
Janet Reno
Clinton
7
10
8
3
55
Homer Cummings
F.D. Roosevelt
5
9
29
4
3
Charles Lee
Washington, J. Adams
5
2
22
5
6
Caesar Rodney
Jefferson, Madison
4
10
15
6
62
Herbert Brownell
Eisenhower
4
9
18
7
12
Benjamin Butler
Jackson, Van Buren
4
9
13
8
49
Thomas Gregory
Wilson
4
6
1
9
82
Eric Holder*
Obama
4
3
14
10
74
William F. Smith
Reagan
4
1
0
* Through May 16, 2013. Excludes service as Acting Attorney General. Table compiled by Smart Politics.

Follow Smart Politics on Twitter.

Previous post: Sestak Seeks First US Senate Rematch in Pennsylvania History
Next post: Tired of 'Scandals?' Try These Words On for Size

Leave a comment


Remains of the Data

Who Has Won the Most Votes in US Senate Electoral History?

Only three of the Top 10 and nine of the Top 50 vote-getters of all time are currently serving in the chamber.

Political Crumbs

Six for Thirteen

Collin Peterson remarked last month that he is leaning to run for reelection to Minnesota's 7th Congressional District in 2016. If he does and is victorious, he will creep even closer to the top of the list of the longest-serving U.S. Representatives in Minnesota history. The DFL congressman is only the sixth Minnesotan to win at least 13 terms to the U.S. House of the 135 elected to the chamber in state history. Peterson trails 18-term DFLer Jim Oberstar (1975-2011), 16-term Republicans Harold Knutson (1917-1949) and August Andresen (1925-1933; 1935-1958), and 14-term DFLers Martin Sabo (1979-2007) and John Blatnik (1947-1974). Andresen died in office, Sabo and Blatnik retired, and Knutson and Oberstar were defeated at the ballot box in 1948 and 2010 respectively. At 70 years, 7 months, 11 days through Monday, Peterson is currently the ninth oldest Gopher State U.S. Representative in history. DFLer Rick Nolan of the 8th CD is the seventh oldest at 71 years, 1 month, 23 days.


Seeing Red

Congressman Nick Rahall's failed bid for a 20th term in West Virginia this cycle, combined with a narrow loss by Nick Casey to Alex Mooney in Shelley Moore Capito's open seat, means that West Virginia Democrats will be shut out of the state's U.S. House delegation for the first time in over 90 years. The Republican sweep by two-term incumbent David McKinley in the 1st CD, Mooney in the 2nd, and Evan Jenkins over Rahall in the 3rd marks the first time the GOP has held all seats in the chamber from West Virginia since the Election of 1920. During the 67th Congress (1921-1923) all six seats from the state were controlled by the GOP. Since the Election of 1922, Democrats have won 76 percent of all U.S. House elections in the Mountain State - capturing 172 seats compared to 54 for the GOP.


more POLITICAL CRUMBS

Humphrey School Sites
CSPG
Humphrey New Media Hub

Issues />

<div id=
Abortion
Afghanistan
Budget and taxes
Campaign finances
Crime and punishment
Economy and jobs
Education
Energy
Environment
Foreign affairs
Gender
Health
Housing
Ideology
Immigration
Iraq
Media
Military
Partisanship
Race and ethnicity
Reapportionment
Redistricting
Religion
Sexuality
Sports
Terrorism
Third parties
Transportation
Voting