Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


How Much Money Will Bachmann Raise as a Non-Candidate?

Bookmark and Share

The Congresswoman is still fundraising on her campaign website with a pitch that Democrats are "trying to defeat her" - even though she is retiring and won't be on the ballot in 2014

bachmannbanner10.jpgNearly two weeks after announcing she would not seek a 5th term from Minnesota's 6th Congressional District, Republican Michele Bachmann's congressional campaign website is still locked and loaded to take in money.

The campaign's donation page is still featured and functional with the following text at the top of the page:

Help Support Michele!

Obama and the Democrats are targeting Michele for speaking out against their extreme liberal agenda. They will do, say and spend whatever it takes to defeat her.

Please make a secure online contribution today to help defend Michele and the conservative values we share!

Of course, it is not unusual for officeholders to see funds trickle into their accounts after announcing their retirement from public office.

That said, Bachmann's website perhaps could use a bit of an update as it leads the contributor to believe she will be running for elected office: "They will do, say and spend whatever it takes to defeat her."

(Unless, perhaps, one takes a less literal meaning from the word 'defeat' to mean defeating Bachmann's ideas).

In the first quarter of this year, Bachmann raised $678,665 - impressive for most House incumbents but down more than 60 percent from the same three-month period in 2011.

One suspects the Congresswoman, who apparently intends to remain somewhat in the media spotlight throughout the rest of her term, will raise significantly more money going forward than most of her retiree predecessors.

For example, consider the incoming receipts for the following well-known members of Congress who retired in the 2012 cycle:

· 16-term Massachusetts Democrat Barney Frank: Announced his retirement in November 2011; raised $16,142 from January-December 2012.

· 15-term New York Democrat Gary Ackerman: Announced his retirement in mid-March 2012; raised $8,318 from April-December 2012.

· 15-term Indiana Republican Dan Burton: Announced his retirement in late January 2012; raised $8,606 from January-December 2012.

· 13-term California Republican Wally Herger: Announced his retirement in mid-January 2012; raised $5,387 from January-December 2012.

Bachmann has not officially ruled out another campaign in the current 2014 cycle or beyond - recently telling FOX's Sean Hannity, "I may run for another public office."

However, since her retirement announcement, Representative Bachmann has not issued a tweet on her campaign Twitter account, a press release on her campaign web site, or a post on her campaign Facebook account.

Follow Smart Politics on Twitter.

Previous post: 2,445 US Representatives Who Served with John Dingell
Next post: Meet the Three House Women Who Go by "Congressman"

2 Comments


  • Under law, will the congresswoman be able to personally keep any money left over in her campaign fund?

  • She can't keep it for "personal" use, but she can hold that money in her account in case she wishes to run for federal elected office in the future.

  • Leave a comment


    Remains of the Data

    Is There a Presidential Drag On Gubernatorial Elections?

    Only five of the 20 presidents to serve since 1900 have seen their party win a majority of gubernatorial elections during their administrations, and only one since JFK.

    Political Crumbs

    Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

    Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


    Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

    Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


    more POLITICAL CRUMBS

    Humphrey School Sites
    CSPG
    Humphrey New Media Hub

    Issues />

<div id=
    Abortion
    Afghanistan
    Budget and taxes
    Campaign finances
    Crime and punishment
    Economy and jobs
    Education
    Energy
    Environment
    Foreign affairs
    Gender
    Health
    Housing
    Ideology
    Immigration
    Iraq
    Media
    Military
    Partisanship
    Race and ethnicity
    Reapportionment
    Redistricting
    Religion
    Sexuality
    Sports
    Terrorism
    Third parties
    Transportation
    Voting