Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


Tim Pawlenty: The Forgotten Man?

Bookmark and Share

During Jeopardy's Teachers Tournament, three educators could not name the capital city from where Tim Pawlenty governed for eight years

timpawlenty10.jpgWhile most contestants on the popular game show Jeopardy! have probably memorized the nation's state capitals, they may not be quite on top of who governed from them.

Even if that governor served for eight years over the last decade and was a presidential candidate just over two years ago.

On Wednesday's episode of the annual Teachers Tournament (#6708), former Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty was mentioned for the fourth time on the program.

In the Jeopardy round, the sixth category for the contestants was "T.P. Your House."

The $200 clue read:

"Tim Pawlenty, from 2003 to 2011 you lived in the governor's mansion in this city."

Karen Cafaro, an English literature and composition teacher from Georgetown, South Carolina, buzzed in incorrectly with: "What is Iowa City?"

While Pawlenty's short-lived presidential candidacy did bet the farm on Iowa and its straw poll in 2011, a better incorrect guess would have been "Des Moines" - the actual capital of the Hawkeye State.

Neither of the two remaining contestants buzzed in, leaving host Alex Trebek to reveal the correct question, "What is St. Paul?"

While teachers may not have been the biggest fans of the Republican Pawlenty administration during his gubernatorial tenure, the former Gopher State governor might be a bit disheartened to learn none of the three contestants were able to collect on his $200 clue (although there was not a Midwesterner in the group).

For in addition to his presidential run and eight years as governor from 2003 to 2011, Pawlenty continued to make national headlines throughout 2012 for being on the short list of running mates for Republican nominee Mitt Romney.

Pawlenty hasn't always had such "Do you know who I am?" moments on Jeopardy!, however.

Over the last five years his name has appeared in a clue or the answer on three other occasions - each of which were answered correctly by the first contestant to buzz in.

· On October 15, 2008 (#5543), The "G"-8, $800: "2008 job title for Ted Strickland, Tim Pawlenty & Bill Richardson" (What is governor?)

· On June 24, 2010 (#5949), State of the State of the Governor, $1,600: "Tim Pawlenty" (What is Minnesota?)

· On April 10, 2013 (#6583), Governors, $2,000: "Seen here, he took over the governor gig from Jesse Ventura." (Who is Tim Pawlenty?)

After leaving his position as co-chairman of the Romney campaign in September 2012 Pawlenty began serving as the CEO of the Financial Services Roundtable.

Follow Smart Politics on Twitter.

Previous post: Ageless Pressler Eyes Historical Rarity in South Dakota
Next post: Plurality Blues: Governors on the Hot Seat

1 Comment


  • www.GovernorTimPawlenty.com

  • Leave a comment


    Remains of the Data

    Kevin McCarthy Becomes Least Tenured Floor Leader in US House History

    At less than four terms, McCarthy has served 423 fewer days in the chamber than any floor leader in U.S. House history and almost 10 years less than the average leader.

    Political Crumbs

    The Second Time Around

    Former Republican Congressman Bob Beauprez became the seventh major party or second place gubernatorial candidate in Colorado to get a second chance at the office when he narrowly won his party's nomination last month. Two of the previous six candidates were successful. Democrat Alva Adams lost his first gubernatorial bid to Benjamin Eaton in 1884, but was victorious two years later against William Meyer. Democrat Charles Johnson placed third in 1894 behind Republican Albert McIntyre and Populist incumbent Governor David Waite but returned as the Fusion (Democrat/Populist) nominee in 1898 and defeated GOPer Henry Wolcott. Gubernatorial candidates who received a second chance but lost both general elections include Democrat Thomas Patterson (1888, 1914), Progressive Edward Costigan (1912, 1914), Republican Donald Brotzman (1954, 1956), and Republican David Strickland (1978, 1986).


    How Are the Plurality Winners Doing?

    Nearly 40 percent of plurality winners of U.S. Senate elections lose their seat in the next election cycle. Will that happen to any of the three such incumbents on the ballot in 2014? Recent polling suggests Democrats Al Franken of Minnesota, Mark Begich of Alaska, and Jeff Merkley of Oregon all currently have an advantage over their nominated/frontrunning GOP opponents, but each is flirting with plurality support once again. Franken led endorsed GOPer Mike McFadden 48 to 42 percent in a new SurveyUSA poll while the polling group showed Merkley with a 50 to 32 percent advantage over Monica Wehby. Begich led each of the three major GOP candidates in last month's PPP survey: 42 to 37 percent over Daniel Sullivan, 41 to 33 percent over Mead Treadwell, and 43 to 27 percent over Joe Miller.


    more POLITICAL CRUMBS

    Humphrey School Sites
    CSPG
    Humphrey New Media Hub

    Issues />

<div id=
    Abortion
    Afghanistan
    Budget and taxes
    Campaign finances
    Crime and punishment
    Economy and jobs
    Education
    Energy
    Environment
    Foreign affairs
    Gender
    Health
    Housing
    Ideology
    Immigration
    Iraq
    Media
    Military
    Partisanship
    Race and ethnicity
    Reapportionment
    Redistricting
    Religion
    Sexuality
    Sports
    Terrorism
    Third parties
    Transportation
    Voting