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Andrews Exits US House with Top 10 Longest Tenure in New Jersey History

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Five of the Top 30 longest-serving New Jersey U.S. Representatives are currently serving in the 113th Congress

robandrews10.jpegTuesday morning brought the news of yet another forthcoming exit of a long-serving member of Congress - this time Democratic U.S. Representative Rob Andrews of New Jersey.

Andrews, who currently serves on the Armed Services and Education and the Workforce Committees in the nation's lower legislative chamber, has represented the 1st Congressional District since winning a special election in November 1990.

At more than 23 years of service, Andrews' tenure puts him in some elite company in the state.

A Smart Politics review of tenure data of New Jersey U.S. Representatives finds that Rob Andrews holds the tenth longest tenure in New Jersey history out of more than 300 who have held the position.

Overall, 314 men and women have served as U.S. Representatives from the Garden State since 1789.

A total of 30 of these members, or less than 10 percent, have been elected to 10 or more terms.

Andrews is one of just 10 representatives from New Jersey who has been elected to the chamber at least 13 times.

Andrews hasn't resigned yet - he is slated to officially exit the chamber later this month to take a public affairs position at a Philadelphia law firm - and through Tuesday has logged 23 years, 2 months, and 29 days in office (8,491 days).

That is good for the 10th longest tenure in state history, with two of his current colleagues in the chamber ahead of him.

GOPer Chris Smith of the 4th CD has been in office for 17 terms, tallying 33 years, 1 month, and 1 day through Tuesday (12,085 days).

That marks the longest stretch in the U.S. House for any Republican in New Jersey history, and second only to Democrat Peter Rodino overall.

Rodino served 40 years (14,610 days) from 1949 to 1989.

Frank Pallone (6th CD), who recently lost the state's 2013 Democratic U.S. Senate nomination to Cory Booker, is seventh in U.S. House service at 25 years, 2 months, 27 days and counting (9,219 days).

Two Congressmen elected during the Republican Revolution of 1994 - Rodney Frelinghuysen (11th CD) and Frank LoBiondo (2nd CD) - are tied for #28 at 19 years, 1 month, 1 day (6,972 days).

Representative Andrews only recently cracked the Top 10 list - passing up Democrat James Howard (1965-1988) nine days ago.

Andrews is now the fifth longest-serving Democratic U.S. Representative in New Jersey history behind Rodino at #1 overall, Frank Thompson at #5 (1955-1980; 25 years, 11 months, 26 days), Mary Norton at #6 (1925-1951; 25 years, 9 months, 30 days), and Pallone at #7.

The remaining Republicans in the Top 10 are Charles Woverton at #3 (1927-1959; 31 years, 9 months, 30 days), Charles Eaton at #4 (1925-1953; 27 years, 9 months, 30 days), William Widnall at #8 (1950-1974; 24 years, 10 months, 25 days), and Hugh Saxton at #9 (1984-2009; 24 years, 1 month, 28 days).

Representative Smith would pass Rodino for the #1 spot if he wins the Elections of 2014, 2016, 2018, and 2020 and serves at least one day of the 117th Congress beginning January 3, 2021.

Top 30 Longest-Serving U.S. Representatives in New Jersey History

Rank
US Representative
Party
In Office
Years
Months
Days
# Days
1
Peter Rodino
DEM
1949-1989
40
0
0
14,610
2
Chris Smith
REP
1981-present
33
1
1
12,085*
3
Charles Woverton
REP
1927-1959
31
9
30
11,628
4
Charles Eaton
REP
1925-1953
27
9
30
10,167
5
Frank Thompson
DEM
1955-1980
25
11
26
9,492
6
Mary Norton
DEM
1925-1951
25
9
30
9,436
7
Frank Pallone
DEM
1988-present
25
2
27
9,219*
8
William Widnall
REP
1950-1974
24
10
25
9,094
9
Hugh Saxton
REP
1984-2009
24
1
28
8,824
10
Rob Andrews
DEM
1990-present
23
2
29
8,491*
11
James Howard
DEM
1965-1988
23
2
22
8,482
12
Donald Payne
DEM
1989-2012
23
2
3
8,463
13
Robert Roe
DEM
1969-1993
23
1
30
8,461
14
Richard Parker
REP
1895-1911; 1914-1919; 1921-1923
22
2
29
8,124
15
James Auchincloss
REP
1943-1965
22
0
0
8,036
15
Joseph Minish
DEM
1963-1985
22
0
0
8,036
17
Peter Frelinghuysen
REP
1953-1975
22
0
0
8,035
17
Margaret Roukema
REP
1981-2003
22
0
0
8,035
19
Isaac Bacharach
REP
1915-1937
21
9
30
7,976
19
Frederick Lehlbach
REP
1915-1937
21
9
30
7,976
21
Edward Hart
DEM
1935-1955
20
0
0
7,305
21
Robert Kean
REP
1939-1959
20
0
0
7,305
21
Gordon Canfield
REP
1941-1961
20
0
0
7,305
21
Matthew Rinaldo
REP
1973-1993
20
0
0
7,305
21
William Hughes
DEM
1975-1995
20
0
0
7,305
26
John Gardner
REP
1893-1913
19
11
27
7,303
27
Fred Hartley
REP
1929-1949
19
9
30
7,245
28
Rodney Frelinghuysen
REP
1995-present
19
1
1
6,972*
28
Frank LoBiondo
REP
1995-present
19
1
1
6,972*
30
Henry Loudenslager
REP
1893-1911
18
5
8
6,734
* Through February 4, 2014. Table compiled by Smart Politics.

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