Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


Vance McAllister: In His Own Words

Bookmark and Share

If Rep. McAllister does not resign, his 2014 opponents will have a treasure trove of statements from the congressman saying one thing and doing another

vancemcallister10.jpgAfter the Ouachita Citizen released a bombshell surveillance video Monday that shows Louisiana Republican U.S. Representative Vance McAllister kissing one of his female staffers, many media outlets were quick to point out that the self-described political outsider ran for election last November as a family man touting conservative values.

And there is ample evidence to support that characterization.

Below are quotes from the then-GOP candidate's campaign for the 2013 special election:

"I am running for U.S. Congress to ensure our conservative and Louisiana values are protected." - (Campaign website Home page)

"Vance McAllister is a veteran, family man, and self-made businessman... Married for 15 years and the father of 5 children, Vance McAllister is worried about the type of future President Obama and career politicians are leaving for the next generation." - (Campaign website Bio page)

"Born and raised in West Carroll Parish, Vance was taught at a young age the importance of faith, family, and hard work. Vance and his wife Kelly have been married for sixteen years. They live in Monroe with their five children and are members of North Monroe Baptist Church." - (Campaign website Issues page: Faith and Family)

"I will maintain my integrity and tell you the truth and run a clean honorable campaign, at the end of the day I have to be true to myself and my lord and savior and know that I am setting the right example for my children." - "(Campaign Facebook post, November 10, 2013)

"I am running for U. S. Congress to ensure our conservative and Louisiana values are protected." - (Campaign Facebook post, September 30, 2013)

"I will give 100% to be your voice and representation as a common sense congressman that has values of faith, family and love." - (Campaign Facebook post, August 23, 2013)

"The values we live by are faith, family, and country. That's how I built my businesses and how my wife are raising our children here in Louisiana....I sure don't want to spend my time in Washington, D.C. away from my family....I'm Vance McAllister. Business owner, family man." - (Campaign video)

A few days after his special election victory on November 16th to fill Rodney Alexander's seat, McAllister wrote:

"Thank you so much to everyone who made this moment possible. I am truly humbled and blessed. I won't disappoint you." - (Campaign Facebook post, November 21, 2013)

As of Monday evening, Representative McAllister has not given any indication that he will resign from his seat in light of the extramarital scandal.

Instead, he released a statement Monday that read:

"There's no doubt I've fallen short and I'm asking for forgiveness. I'm asking for forgiveness from God, my wife, my kids, my staff, and my constituents who elected me to serve. Trust is something I know has to be earned whether your a husband, a father, or a congressman. I promise to do everything I can to earn back the trust of everyone I've disappointed. From day one, I've always tried to be an honest man. I ran for congress to make a difference and not to just be another politician. I don't want to make a political statement on this, I would just simply like to say that I'm very sorry for what I've done. While I realize I serve the public, I would appreciate the privacy given to my children as we get through this."

Follow Smart Politics on Twitter.

Previous post: Tom Petri to Face Rare Republican Challenger in 2014
Next post: The Shortest Tenures of Louisiana US Reps in History

Leave a comment


Remains of the Data

Is There a Presidential Drag On Gubernatorial Elections?

Only five of the 20 presidents to serve since 1900 have seen their party win a majority of gubernatorial elections during their administrations, and only one since JFK.

Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


more POLITICAL CRUMBS

Humphrey School Sites
CSPG
Humphrey New Media Hub

Issues />

<div id=
Abortion
Afghanistan
Budget and taxes
Campaign finances
Crime and punishment
Economy and jobs
Education
Energy
Environment
Foreign affairs
Gender
Health
Housing
Ideology
Immigration
Iraq
Media
Military
Partisanship
Race and ethnicity
Reapportionment
Redistricting
Religion
Sexuality
Sports
Terrorism
Third parties
Transportation
Voting