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The Short Half-Life of a First-Term US Senator

Three fell in 2014 and more than half of all defeated U.S. Senators over the last 100 years have been in their first term; at least one first-term incumbent has lost reelection in 47 of the 51 election cycles during the direct election era.

Did Jeb Bush Wait Too Long to Run for President?

It has been 150+ years since the last time there was a 14-year gap between a presidential candidate's last electoral victory and a successful White House campaign.

Plurality-Winning Governors Elected At Century-Long High Water Mark

The rate of gubernatorial candidates elected without the support of a majority of voters is at its highest level since the 1910s.

Two Female US Senators Lose Seats in 2014 for First Time in History

Despite losses by Mary Landrieu and Kay Hagan this cycle, female U.S. Senators have been reelected to the chamber at nearly the same rate (84 percent) as males (87 percent) over the last quarter-century.

Senate Will Have Historic Number of Ex-US Reps in 114th Congress

With a Cassidy victory in Louisiana, the 114th Congress will convene with more U.S. Senators who previously served in the U.S. House than in any Congress dating back to at least 1899.

The Day After: How the Dow Jones 'Reacts' to Election Day Results

Gains in the stock market last Wednesday after the GOP wave were only slightly above the historical average; the biggest day-after drops in the market have occurred after the election of Democratic presidents.

Rock Bottom: Democrats Hit Multiple Low Water Marks in US Senate Elections

Ten of the 34 states with U.S. Senate races in 2014 found the Democratic Party endure one of its three worst performances in the direct election era.

Senators Greg, Bruce, and Michelle? The Names They Are a-Changin'

The Senate will likely add another James, Mike, and Steve to its ranks after the 2014 election, but could also welcome new Senators with names never previously seen among its membership.

Is There a Presidential Drag On Gubernatorial Elections?

Only five of the 20 presidents to serve since 1900 have seen their party win a majority of gubernatorial elections during their administrations, and only one since JFK.

No Wiggle Room: The 2014 Gubernatorial Elections Are Lousy with Toss-ups

The eight tightest gubernatorial races in the country all involve incumbents and the 2014 cycle could yield the most gubernatorial races decided by less than a point since at least 1900.

The Revolution Continues: 3rd Party and Independent US Senate Candidacies in 2 Charts

The rate of third party and independent U.S. Senate candidacies over the last two decades has increased 60+ percent compared to the first 75 years of the direct election era; 2014 may make the biggest splash yet.

Blowout: More Than 1 in 6 US House Races Have Just One Major Party Nominee

Regional differences are stark: major parties were unable to recruit candidates in 27 percent of Southern contests compared to just one percent in the Midwest.

No Free Passes: States With 2 Major Party Candidates in Every US House Race

Indiana has now placed candidates from both major parties on the ballot in a nation-best 189 consecutive U.S. House races, with New Hampshire, Minnesota, Idaho, and Montana also north of 100 in a row.

Holder Could Still Reach #3 Attorney General Tenure Mark

If his successor is not confirmed by December 5th, Holder will pass Homer Cummings for third place on the all-time tenure list.

Democratic US Senators Slow Out of the Gate to Respond to Syrian Bombing

Republican U.S. Senators issued press releases on the air strikes within the first 24 hours at more than twice the rate of Democrats and at four times the rate for those who are running for reelection in 2014.

The 10 Percent Club: 2014 Gubernatorial Edition

At least four third party, independent, or write-in gubernatorial candidates have won 10+ percent of the vote in every midterm election since the 1986 cycle - a trend likely to continue this November.

42 Members of Congress Who Were Born in Scotland

Twenty states have been represented in Congress by a Scottish-born U.S. Representative or U.S. Senator, including one Speaker of the House.

US Senators Record Renomination Sweep for 15th Time Since 1914

Incumbency advantage alert: 11 of these 15 cycles have occurred since 1982.

Will a New Female Governor Be Elected in 2014?

Up to five female major party nominees will be on the ballot this November attempting to win their first gubernatorial election.

A Brief History of Ex-Governors Returning to Power

Nearly 150 ex-governors in U.S. history have returned to their position after a gap in service; five have done so after changing parties since 1900 with Charlie Crist of Florida hoping to be the sixth in 2014.

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Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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