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Alaska


Mark Begich and Sean Parnell Join Small Group in Defeat

Over the last 50 years, just five pairs of incumbent governors and U.S. Senators from different political parties in the same state have been defeated.

Will Alaskans "Throw All the Bums Out" for the First Time in History?

Alaskans have never voted both gubernatorial and U.S. Senate incumbents out of office in the same cycle; incumbents in all three statewide offices could lose Tuesday.

The 10 Percent Club: 2014 Gubernatorial Edition

At least four third party, independent, or write-in gubernatorial candidates have won 10+ percent of the vote in every midterm election since the 1986 cycle - a trend likely to continue this November.

Media Analysis: Iowa US Senate Race Is 2014's True Toss-up

A study of 2014 U.S. Senate race ratings finds the odds of a pick-up in Iowa's race between Bruce Braley and Joni Ernst are closer to 50-50 than any other contest in the country.

Sullivan Advances with Lowest GOP US Senate Primary Support in Alaska History

The Alaska GOP nominee is the first to advance to a U.S. Senate general election with only plurality support.

Which States Elect the "Most Beautiful" People to Congress?

South Dakotans elect the highest rate of beautiful legislators, if The Hill's annual list is a guide for such a measure.

Which US Senate Seats Will Flip in 2014? A Survey of Media Rankings

Media election forecasters can only agree on one slot of the Top 12 U.S. Senate seats most likely to change control after the November elections.

The Final Six: Which State Will Next Elect Its 1st Woman to the US House?

Six states have yet to elect a woman to the U.S. House of Representatives, but one is poised to be crossed off that list in 2014.

Which States Have the Highest Rates of Female Gubernatorial Nominees?

Western states dominate the top of the list, with Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Nevada, Washington, and Wyoming all in the Top 10.

On the Hot Seat: US Senate Plurality-Vote Winners

Nearly 40 percent of plurality vote winners of U.S. Senate contests have lost their seat in the next election; three are on the ballot in 2014 (Begich, Franken, Merkley).

Joe Miller, You Will Be Challenged

Fifty-one Republican candidates have run in the 19 Alaska U.S. Senate primaries conducted since 1960.

Record Book Near Misses in the 2012 Presidential Election

The Romney-Obama contest ranked among the Top 5 most competitive races ever in three states (AK, FL, NC) and the Top 5 least competitive in six (HI, MD, OK, UT, WV, WY).

The Western Front: Gary Johnson's Libertarian Stronghold

The Top 12 states with the largest average Libertarian vote totals in presidential elections are all located in the western region of the country, led by Alaska, Arizona, and Wyoming.

US House Tenure Varies Wildly Across the 50 States Throughout History

U.S. Representatives from western states serve an average of 2.9 years longer than those from northeastern states throughout history.

Ron Paul's Hotbeds of Financial Support: New Hampshire, Nevada, Wyoming, and Alaska

Paul's Top 4 states in large donor per capita individual contributions are identical in 2012 from his 2008 presidential bid.

Which States Have the Longest-Serving U.S. House Delegations?

Alaska, Massachusetts, and Michigan boast the longest average length of service; Democrats average 5+ years more experience than Republicans

Murkowski Wins More Votes Than All Statewide Write-in Candidates in Alaska History Combined

Only 94,926 Alaskans had cast their ballot for statewide write-in candidates over the previous 52 years; Murkowski eclipses 100,000

When Alaska and Delaware Come Full Circle

Republican Party leaders and Tea Party Express rail against Murkowski's write-in bid whilst supporting O'Donnell who similarly launched '06 write-in campaign after GOP primary loss

Run, Murkowski, Run? A Historical Review of Alaskan Statewide Write-in Campaigns

No Alaskan candidate for statewide office has won more than 27 percent in a write-in campaign

No Recipe for Success for Murkowski Write-In Campaign in Alaska

Senator Ernest Gruening's model for potential Murkowski write-in candidacy netted just 17 percent in 1968

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Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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