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Illinois


Which States Are Likely to Split Their Presidential-US Senate Vote in 2016?

States have split their ballot only 29 percent of the time in presidential and U.S. Senate elections over the last century; 6% in NC, 11% in WI and 16% in IL (key 2016 battlegrounds).

A Brief History of Illinois US Reps Running for Senate

Just eight sitting or ex-U.S. House members from Illinois have run for the U.S. Senate over the last 24 elections since 1944; the last time two or more faced off in a Senate primary was 1938.

The Election of African-Americans to the US House Since 1963

Six states have elected black candidates in more than 10 percent of its U.S. House elections conducted since MLK's 'I Have a Dream' speech; 24 states haven't elected any.

Libertarians Notch Record-Setting Cycle in 2014 US Senate Elections

Nominees from the nation's largest third party set records in 10 states last cycle for the largest support ever recorded in a U.S. Senate election.

Republicans Winning Midwestern Governorships at Near Record Rate

At 82 percent this decade, the GOP is enjoying its highest winning percentage in gubernatorial elections in the region since the 1920s.

No Wiggle Room: The 2014 Gubernatorial Elections Are Lousy with Toss-ups

The eight tightest gubernatorial races in the country all involve incumbents and the 2014 cycle could yield the most gubernatorial races decided by less than a point since at least 1900.

Strange Bedfellows: A Historical Review of Divided US Senate Delegations

Over the last century, states have been twice as likely to be represented by a single political party in the U.S. Senate than have a split delegation; only Delaware, Iowa, and Illinois have been divided more than half the time.

Could Dayton Be the Lone Democratic Victor in 2014 Midwestern Gubernatorial Races?

At least one other Midwestern state has voted a Democrat into office each of the 15 times Minnesotans have elected a Democratic governor since statehood.

Will Obama Save Pat Quinn in 2014? Low Drag in Presidents' Home States

Eighty percent of gubernatorial nominees from the sitting president's party have been victorious in his home state over the last century.

Could Republicans Sweep All 9 Midwestern Gubernatorial Elections in 2014?

It has only happened one time in the last 90+ years, but the political climate just might allow the GOP to claim all nine Midwestern governorships on the ballot this November.

Illinois Gubernatorial Primary Wrap-Up

Bruce Rauner becomes the 13th plurality winner in an Illinois gubernatorial primary election in state history; five have gone on to win the general election.

One Strike and You're Out? Bill Brady's Impossible Dream

No losing Illinois gubernatorial nominee has come back to win the governor's race in state history and only two have made it back onto the general election ballot.

Plurality Blues: Governors on the Hot Seat

Since 1900, less than half of plurality-winning governors who were eligible for another term were reelected to their seat in the next cycle.

House GOP Leader Highlights Obama Connection

Although a frequent critic of the president and Obamacare, Chief Deputy Whip Peter Roskam proudly underscores his old relationship with Obama on his House website.

Edward Baker: The Lone Sitting Member of Congress Killed in War

The longtime friend of Abraham Lincoln died at the Battle of Balls Bluff with the rank of major general in 1861 while also serving in the U.S. Senate from Oregon.

CT, IL, MN Gubernatorial Races: From 2010 Nail-Biters to 2014 Snoozers?

Since 1900, there have been 18 candidates elected governor by less than one percentage point who won reelection the next cycle by double-digits; could Dan Malloy, Mark Dayton, and Pat Quinn do the same in 2014?

The Most Competitive States for Gubernatorial Elections Since 1900

New Mexico's races have been the most narrowly decided followed by Indiana and Ohio; Illinois captures top honors since the Reagan Revolution with Rhode Island the one to watch since the Republican Revolution.

Duckworth, Castro Lead House Freshman Class in Early Media Buzz

While most new U.S. Representatives have lain low during their first month in office, a half-dozen freshmen have received more than half the media coverage of their entire class.

Wisconsin Republican Primary Results Mirror Illinois in Modern Era

The Badger and Prairie States have voted for the same Republican presidential candidate for 11 consecutive election cycles, with a victory margin differential usually within single digits between the two states

Romney Carries Illinois Primary with Lowest Ever Winning Percentage

The former Massachusetts governor becomes one of just three winners in 100 years of the primary to fail to reach the 50 percent mark.

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Political Crumbs

Six for Thirteen

Collin Peterson remarked last month that he is leaning to run for reelection to Minnesota's 7th Congressional District in 2016. If he does and is victorious, he will creep even closer to the top of the list of the longest-serving U.S. Representatives in Minnesota history. The DFL congressman is only the sixth Minnesotan to win at least 13 terms to the U.S. House of the 135 elected to the chamber in state history. Peterson trails 18-term DFLer Jim Oberstar (1975-2011), 16-term Republicans Harold Knutson (1917-1949) and August Andresen (1925-1933; 1935-1958), and 14-term DFLers Martin Sabo (1979-2007) and John Blatnik (1947-1974). Andresen died in office, Sabo and Blatnik retired, and Knutson and Oberstar were defeated at the ballot box in 1948 and 2010 respectively. At 70 years, 7 months, 11 days through Monday, Peterson is currently the ninth oldest Gopher State U.S. Representative in history. DFLer Rick Nolan of the 8th CD is the seventh oldest at 71 years, 1 month, 23 days.


Seeing Red

Congressman Nick Rahall's failed bid for a 20th term in West Virginia this cycle, combined with a narrow loss by Nick Casey to Alex Mooney in Shelley Moore Capito's open seat, means that West Virginia Democrats will be shut out of the state's U.S. House delegation for the first time in over 90 years. The Republican sweep by two-term incumbent David McKinley in the 1st CD, Mooney in the 2nd, and Evan Jenkins over Rahall in the 3rd marks the first time the GOP has held all seats in the chamber from West Virginia since the Election of 1920. During the 67th Congress (1921-1923) all six seats from the state were controlled by the GOP. Since the Election of 1922, Democrats have won 76 percent of all U.S. House elections in the Mountain State - capturing 172 seats compared to 54 for the GOP.


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