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Massachusetts


Plurality-Winning Governors Elected At Century-Long High Water Mark

The rate of gubernatorial candidates elected without the support of a majority of voters is at its highest level since the 1910s.

Mark Begich and Sean Parnell Join Small Group in Defeat

Over the last 50 years, just five pairs of incumbent governors and U.S. Senators from different political parties in the same state have been defeated.

Massachusetts Republican US House Losing Streak Tops 100

It has been 20 years since the last time Republicans won a U.S. House race in the Bay State; the GOP losing streak has now reached a nation-worst 101 in a row.

Tierney Loss Ends Massachusetts US Rep Renomination Streak at 95

It had been 22 years since the last time a member of the Bay State's U.S. House delegation lost a renomination bid; only two of 220 incumbents have lost a primary since 1972.

Will a New Female Governor Be Elected in 2014?

Up to five female major party nominees will be on the ballot this November attempting to win their first gubernatorial election.

Patriotic Exits? 35 Members of Congress Who Died on July 4th

Four members of the U.S. House died on Independence Day while in office; North Carolina and Pennsylvania delegations have had the most pass on the 4th of July.

Massachusetts Republicans Lose 92nd Consecutive US House Race

Bay State Republicans have lost 92 contests in a row and picked off just 2 of 294 Democratic-held Massachusetts U.S. House seats since 1944.

Paying His Dues: Markey Shatters Senate Record for Prior House Service

The newest member of the U.S. Senate breaks a record that had been held for 88 years - by a predecessor of his own Senate seat.

How Long Will Ed Markey Serve?

Markey is the 11th oldest candidate to win a U.S. Senate special election out of more than 170 men and women since the passage of the 17th Amendment.

US Senate Special Elections by the Numbers

Which two states have held seven special elections since 1913? Which two states have yet to hold one? And which Senator was elected via special election three times?

Off the Radar? Chechnya Never Mentioned in Public by Obama

Bill Clinton and George W. Bush discussed the troubled region nearly 100 times over a 10-year period that saw two Chechen wars and high-profile terrorist acts that killed several hundred Russians.

Scott Brown: To New Hampshire with Love?

Nearly 40 percent of New Hampshire U.S. Senators in state history have been educated in Massachusetts and more than one in six were born in the Bay State.

The Five-Timers Club: Gubernatorial Edition

Thirty-seven governors in U.S. history were elected into office at least five times but only 10 served in the 20th or 21st Centuries; four members of the Club are alive today.

Scott Brown: The Return of the King?

If Scott Brown wins Massachusetts' U.S. Senate special election in June he will return to the chamber with the ninth shortest gap in service in history.

Massachusetts to Hold Senate Elections at Rate Not Seen in 50+ Years

It has been more than 50 years since a state has held three Senate elections in three consecutive years or four Senate contests over a five-year span.

Democrats Amass 144 Consecutive US House Victories in Four Northeastern States

Democratic nominees have won 144 U.S. House contests in a row in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, and Rhode Island.

20 Presidential Tickets That Lost Both Home States

Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan are not alone in failing to carry their home states this election cycle, although theirs is the first such ticket in 40 years.

Romney Suffers 2nd Worst Home State Loss in Presidential Election History

Only John Frémont in 1856 lost his home state by a larger margin than Romney out of 100+ major party presidential nominees on the ballot since the formation of the Democratic Party in 1828.

Schizophrenic Electorates or Short Obama Coattails? D/R Split Ticket Voting in 2012

Connecticut, Michigan, Nevada, Virginia, and Wisconsin are five of 18 states never to split their ticket by voting for a Democratic presidential nominee and a Republican U.S. Senate candidate in the same cycle.

Joe Kennedy III May Reboot the Kennedy Dynasty's Congressional Franchise

Five Kennedys in Joe's ancestral line have logged more than 92 years of service in Congress - besting the Longs of Louisiana by 21 years.

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Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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