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Michigan


John Dingell Served with 2,453 US Representatives

The Michigander served alongside 86 percent of all female U.S. Representatives elected to the chamber through the 113th Congress.

Republicans Winning Midwestern Governorships at Near Record Rate

At 82 percent this decade, the GOP is enjoying its highest winning percentage in gubernatorial elections in the region since the 1920s.

It's All Relative: Michigan US Representatives Edition

While only seven of Michigan's 271 U.S. Representatives in history had family members who previously served in Congress, three are currently serving in the chamber with another poised to take office in 2015.

Which States Have the Most Undecided Voters in 2014 US Senate Races?

Open seat races in Michigan and Iowa have led the way with the highest percentage of undecided voters in 2014 polling among the 16 states with key U.S. Senate contests.

Which US Senate Seats Will Flip in 2014? A Survey of Media Rankings

Media election forecasters can only agree on one slot of the Top 12 U.S. Senate seats most likely to change control after the November elections.

Could Dayton Be the Lone Democratic Victor in 2014 Midwestern Gubernatorial Races?

At least one other Midwestern state has voted a Democrat into office each of the 15 times Minnesotans have elected a Democratic governor since statehood.

Will Michigan Split Its Ticket This November?

In one out of every three cycles for the past century the Wolverine State has split its vote for governor and U.S. Senator.

Could Republicans Sweep All 9 Midwestern Gubernatorial Elections in 2014?

It has only happened one time in the last 90+ years, but the political climate just might allow the GOP to claim all nine Midwestern governorships on the ballot this November.

Debbie Dingell Eyes Historic Win in 2014

Dingell could become the first non-widowed woman to immediately take over a spouse's seat in Congress.

John Dingell By the Numbers

The Michigan Congressman has served with 2,448 U.S. Representatives to date including 24 named 'Smith' and 86 percent of all women elected to the chamber in U.S. history.

Michigan Democrats' Gerrymandering Problem at Historic Level

In 2012, Michigan tied a state record by electing the lowest rate of U.S. Representatives by a major party whilst simultaneously casting its electoral votes for that party's presidential nominee across the 45 presidential election cycles since statehood.

2,445 US Representatives Who Served with John Dingell

From Watkins Abbitt to John Zwach, Dingell has worked alongside nearly 2,500 different elected men and women over the last 21,000 days in the nation's lower legislative chamber.

The Oldest (and Youngest) US House Delegations in the 113th Congress

West Virginia and Oregon have the oldest multi-member delegations to the House with Kansas and Arkansas the youngest.

Rick Snyder 2014: Michigan Governors Win Reelection at 77% Rate

Gubernatorial incumbents from Michigan are victorious more than three-fourths of the time in general election bids with Republican incumbents at more than 80%.

Libertarian Candidates Surging in US Senate Contests

Libertarian hopefuls in Michigan and Missouri are on pace to notch the best ever showing for a non-major party U.S. Senate candidate in their respective states.

Battleground State Maps Expand Slightly from a Month Ago

The selection of Paul Ryan as GOP VP nominee moves the needle on Wisconsin but few other states in the presidential race according to a dozen media outlets.

Schizophrenic Electorates or Short Obama Coattails? D/R Split Ticket Voting in 2012

Connecticut, Michigan, Nevada, Virginia, and Wisconsin are five of 18 states never to split their ticket by voting for a Democratic presidential nominee and a Republican U.S. Senate candidate in the same cycle.

Thaddeus McCotter, Meet Bob Dornan

Michigan Republican Congressman Thaddeus McCotter's filing error, which left him hundreds of valid signatures shy to appear on the Wolverine State's U.S. House primary ballot in August, may spell the end of the five-term congressman's tenure in D.C. If McCotter fails in his recently announced write-in campaign to keep his...

A State Divided: Will Romney or Santorum Reach 40 Percent in Michigan?

Tuesday's winner could set the all-time state mark for the lowest victory total in a Michigan presidential primary.

Hoekstra Challenge in Michigan U.S. Senate Race Faces Long Historical Odds

It has been over 150 years since an ex-U.S. Representative won a Senate seat in Michigan.

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Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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