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Unusual Entrances: Clergymen Turned US Senators

North Carolina's Mark Harris is trying to add his name to a list of less than two-dozen members of the clergy who have served in the Senate in U.S. history and only three who were elected to the chamber since the turn of the 19th Century.

7 Gubernatorial Election Double-Takes

The Idaho GOP didn't give us Labrador vs. Otter in 2014, so Smart Politics takes a look back at some eyebrow raising surname matchups in gubernatorial electoral history.

A Brief History of "Representative Smith"

A look back at the 115 "Smiths" to serve in the House as newly-minted U.S. Representative Jason Smith of Missouri adds his name to the roster.

Missouri Democratic US House Pick-Up Drought Extends to 47

Democrats have lost each of the last 47 Missouri U.S. House contests in Republican controlled districts dating back to 1994 - its second worst streak in the nation.

Can Colbert Busch End the Nation's Largest Democratic Pick-Up Drought?

South Carolina Democrats have recorded 47 consecutive contests without picking up a GOP-held U.S. House seat, eclipsing Missouri (45), Nebraska (33), and Georgia (30).

Record-Setting 3rd Party and Independent Candidacies Abound in 2012 US Senate Races

Five candidates set all-time statewide records for non-major party candidates in U.S. Senate races this cycle.

Libertarian Candidates Surging in US Senate Contests

Libertarian hopefuls in Michigan and Missouri are on pace to notch the best ever showing for a non-major party U.S. Senate candidate in their respective states.

Will a Libertarian Tilt Missouri's U.S. Senate Race?

The victory margin in only 1 of 37 Missouri U.S. Senate races has been narrower than the vote received by the leading third place candidate.

Todd Akin Seeks to Complete the Republican Hat Trick

Including GOPers Jim Talent (2002) and Roy Blunt (2010), just 5 Missouri U.S. House members have been elected to the Senate since 1914; nearly three times as many have failed.

Missouri GOP US Senate Barnburner Poised for Closest Primary Finish in 56 Years

Only three of the 35 Republican primaries for the U.S. Senate have been decided by less than 10 points in state history with the average margin of victory at more than 50 points.

Battleground States of the Century: Missouri, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin

Only seven states have had more than half of their presidential election contests decided by single digits over the last 100 years: Missouri, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Ohio, New Hampshire, Delaware, and Oregon.

Impenetrable: Which States Have the Greatest Democratic Dry Spells in Picking Up US House Seats?

South Carolina Republicans have successfully defended their last 42 House seats since 1988; the Missouri GOP is 40-0 in defending its districts since 1994.

Did Ozzy Osbourne Make the First "Satan Sandwich?"

Emmanuel Cleaver was not the first public figure to use this devilish metaphor.

Missouri's Population Trends Over the Last 100 Years

The Show Me State has dropped from the 7th to the 18th most populous state in the nation since 1910, losing half of its U.S. House seats along the way

Meet the New Bellwether States: Ohio and Nevada

Ohio has the longest current streak in the nation with 12 consecutive elections voting for the winning presidential candidate; Nevada has the highest rate over the last 100 years at 96 percent (24 of 25 cycles)

Presidential Battleground States by the Numbers Since 1968

Wisconsin and Pennsylvania lead the way with nine races decided by single-digits over the last 11 presidential election cycles; Missouri and Oregon are next with eight

Which States Produce the Most U.S. Senators?

Over the last 100 years Ohio, New York, and Missouri have given birth to the most Senators, while Ohio, Vermont and Mississippi boast the largest percentage of home-born Senators

Which U.S. Senate Seats Have Had the Most Partisan Turnover?

Six seats up for election in 2012 rank in the top 10 for the most frequent change in party control since the introduction of popular vote elections, including Sherrod Brown's (OH), Claire McCaskill's (MO), and Joe Lieberman's (CT)

Missouri Primary Live Blog

3:35 p.m. Last polls close in Missouri at 7:00 p.m. CST. The Democrats will allocate 72 of its 88 convention delegates from the primary vote today: 47 pledged delegates are allocated proportionally based on the vote in each of the state's nine congressional districts, while 25 delegates are allocated based...

McCain Still Top GOP Dog In Battleground States

As tracked here at Smart Politics over the past few months, John McCain continues to prove to be the strongest Republican candidate to defeat the Democrats in 2008. McCain consistently, and by wide margins, polls better than his chief GOP rivals in almost all key battleground states—those states that Republicans...

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Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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