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New Hampshire


Blue Islands in a Red Sea

Democratic gubernatorial winning streaks against the GOP have set or matched record highs in New Hampshire, Oregon, Washington, and California.

Mark Begich and Sean Parnell Join Small Group in Defeat

Over the last 50 years, just five pairs of incumbent governors and U.S. Senators from different political parties in the same state have been defeated.

Scott Brown Becomes 1st US Senate Nominee to Lose to 2 Women

Brown is just the fourth U.S. Senate candidate in history to face major party female nominees in three different cycles; he is also the first to lose in two of them.

Is There a Presidential Drag On Gubernatorial Elections?

Only five of the 20 presidents to serve since 1900 have seen their party win a majority of gubernatorial elections during their administrations, and only one since JFK.

Will New Hampshire Split Its Gubernatorial and US Senate Vote in 2014?

Electing a Democratic governor and a Republican U.S. Senator has been a common practice in the Granite State over the last half-century.

No Free Passes: States With 2 Major Party Candidates in Every US House Race

Indiana has now placed candidates from both major parties on the ballot in a nation-best 189 consecutive U.S. House races, with New Hampshire, Minnesota, Idaho, and Montana also north of 100 in a row.

Scott Brown Could Become 1st US Senate Nominee to Lose to Two Women

A primary victory will make Brown just the fourth U.S. Senate candidate in history to face major party female nominees in three different cycles; he could also become the first to lose in two of them.

Bob Smith and the 12-Year Itch

With a successful challenge of Jeanne Shaheen in 2014, Smith would tie Dan Coats' modern mark for the longest gap in U.S. Senate service in the direct election era.

Unusual Entrances: Clergymen Turned US Senators

North Carolina's Mark Harris is trying to add his name to a list of less than two-dozen members of the clergy who have served in the Senate in U.S. history and only three who were elected to the chamber since the turn of the 19th Century.

Shea-Porter vs Guinta III: 1 in 5 New Hampshire US House Races Are Rematches

Thirty-six New Hampshire U.S. House elections have been rematches since birth of the GOP in the 1850s, including five pairs of candidates who have battled it out three times.

Could Scott Brown Win the Presidency?

Brown might be considering a presidential run, but very few presidents since Lincoln lost their last statewide race.

Democracy in Action: Major Party Competition in US House Elections

Indiana has placed Democratic and Republican candidates on the ballot in a nation-best 180 consecutive U.S. House races, with New Hampshire, Minnesota, Idaho, and Montana all tallying 100 or more.

Scott Brown: To New Hampshire with Love?

Nearly 40 percent of New Hampshire U.S. Senators in state history have been educated in Massachusetts and more than one in six were born in the Bay State.

New Hampshire to Become 1st State with an All-Female DC Delegation

Democratic pick-ups by Carol Shea-Porter and Ann Kuster in the Granite State's two U.S. House districts gives New Hampshire the nation's first ever all-female D.C. delegation.

Final Battleground Maps: 114 Electoral Votes Up for Grabs

A dozen media outlets still yield 10 different battleground state maps less than a week from Election Day, with an average of nine states and 114 electoral votes hanging in the balance.

Deep Benches: Which States Consistently Field US House Candidates from Both Parties?

Democrats and Republicans in New Hampshire, Indiana, Minnesota, and Idaho have fielded candidates in each of the last 100+ U.S. House races in their respective states.

Perry's New Hampshire Tally Shy of Morry Taylor, Phil Crane, and George Romney

The Texas governor receives less support in the Granite State than many forgotten presidential candidates.

Romney Notches 30 Percent of Speaking Time in Weekend's New Hampshire Debates

The GOP frontrunner doubles up on Paul, Gingrich, and Huntsman and triples the speaking time of Perry.

Ron Paul Reaches All-Time Polling Highs in Iowa and New Hampshire

Paul's support is up 100 percent in Iowa and 50 percent in the Granite State from his '08 campaign peaks.

Ron Paul's Hotbeds of Financial Support: New Hampshire, Nevada, Wyoming, and Alaska

Paul's Top 4 states in large donor per capita individual contributions are identical in 2012 from his 2008 presidential bid.

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Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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