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Going Home? Joe Manchin Eyes Rare Electoral Feat in 2016

In 2016, West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin may become just the sixth former governor in the last 100 years who then won a U.S. Senate seat only to return to his gubernatorial post.

Libertarians Notch Record-Setting Cycle in 2014 US Senate Elections

Nominees from the nation's largest third party set records in 10 states last cycle for the largest support ever recorded in a U.S. Senate election.

Andrews Exits US House with Top 10 Longest Tenure in New Jersey History

Five of the Top 30 longest-serving New Jersey U.S. Representatives are currently serving in the 113th Congress.

Landslides Ahead: Major Parties Still Lack 2014 US Senate Candidates in 8 States

It has been 96 years since the last time a major party did not field a candidate in eight or more U.S. Senate races.

Runyan 1st New Jersey Sophomore US Rep to Call it Quits in 65 Years

The New Jersey Republican is the first two-term U.S. Representative from the Garden State not to seek a third term since 1948, and only the 6th out of more than 100 to serve since 1900.

Virginia's 'National Naysayer' Streak Ends While New Jersey's Continues

For the first time in 40 years, Virginians elected a governor from the party of the sitting president; New Jersey extends its streak to seven cycles - second longest in the country.

How Often Are Female Gubernatorial Nominees Victorious?

Incumbent female governors have won 83 percent of the time, while female challengers have won just six percent of gubernatorial general election contests.

The Third Wheel: States with the Most 3rd Party US Senate Candidacies

New Jersey leads a pack of Northeastern and Midwestern states with the highest rate of independent and third party candidates in U.S. Senate elections over the past century.

Chiesa to Tally 4th Shortest Senate Tenure in New Jersey History

Chris Christie's appointee will serve just 129 days in the Senate - the fourth shortest stint among the 65 U.S. Senators to serve from New Jersey since statehood.

How Long Will New Jersey's US Senate Seat Remain Vacant?

New Jersey has endured 27 vacancies throughout history totaling more than three years; four vacancies have lasted more than 100 days.

The Longest Republican US Senate Droughts in the Nation

It has been a combined 141 years since the GOP won a U.S. Senate race in West Virginia (1956), Hawaii (1970), and New Jersey (1972).

Mounting US Senate Retirements: Tired of DC or Just Plain Tired?

The five U.S. Senators who have announced their retirement during the 113th Congress are 10 years older on average than any 'retiring class' from the chamber over the last five decades.

Could Cory Booker Oust Frank Lautenberg?

Only 1 of 25 New Jersey U.S. Senate incumbents have lost their renomination bids since the state's first direct election in 1916.

Is the Revolution Over? 3rd Party US House Candidacies Fall 22% from 2010

There are 97 fewer third party and independent candidates on the general election ballots for the nation's 435 congressional district races this cycle compared to two years ago.

Broadcast Media in Love with Republican Governors in 2012

GOP governors land the Top 10 spots for the most broadcast reports mentioning their names since January, led by Rick Perry, Chris Christie, Scott Walker, and Rick Scott.

Chris Christie and New Jersey's 95-Year Presidential Nominee Drought

Only two states with larger populations than New Jersey have had longer droughts in producing a major party presidential nominee (Florida and North Carolina).

Third Party U.S. House Candidates Spike to Largest Midterm Election Mark Since 1934

With an average of more than one candidate per district, it has been over 75 years since this many independent and third party U.S. House candidates appeared on midterm general election ballots

Which States Have the Most Living Ex-Governors?

250 ex-governors are still living in the United States; New Jersey has five times more living former governors (10) than Connecticut and Wyoming (2)

What Do the New Jersey and Virginia Gubernatorial Elections Mean? (And Are They Predictors of Midterms?)

The two states have voted in tandum during the last five gubernatorial elections dating back to 1989 - and always electing the party which is not in control of the White House

New Jersey Primary Live Blog

3:24 p.m. Last polls close in New Jersey at 7:00 p.m. CST. The Democrats will allocate 107 of its 127 convention delegates from the primary vote today: 70 delegates are allocated based on the vote in 20 delegate districts (comprised of two state legislative districts) while 37 delegates are allocated...



Political Crumbs

73 Months and Counting

January's preliminary Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers show Minnesota's unemployment rate of 3.7 percent was once again lower than Wisconsin's 5.0 percent. That marks the 73rd consecutive month in which Minnesota has boasted a lower jobless rate than its neighbor to the east dating back to January 2009 including each of the last 67 months by at least one point. The Gopher State has now edged Wisconsin in the employment border battle for 204 of the last 216 months dating back to February 1997. Wisconsin only managed a lower unemployment rate than Minnesota for the 12 months of 2008 during this 18-year span.


Two Dakotas, One Voice?

For each of the last 24 presidential elections since 1920, North and South Dakota have voted in unison - casting their ballots for the same nominee. For 21 of these cycles (including each of the last 12 since 1968) Republicans carried the Dakotas with just three cycles going to the Democrats (1932, 1936, and 1964). This streak stands in contrast to the first few decades after statehood when North and South Dakota supported different nominees in four of the first seven cycles. North Dakota narrowly backed Populist James Weaver in 1892 while South Dakota voted for incumbent Republican Benjamin Harrison. In 1896, it was North Dakota backing GOPer William McKinley while South Dakota supported Democrat William Jennings Bryan by less than 200 votes. North Dakota voted Democratic in 1912 and 1916 supporting Woodrow Wilson while South Dakota cast its Electoral College votes for Progressive Teddy Roosevelt and Republican Charles Hughes respectively.


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