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Which States Have the Longest and Shortest Election Day Voting Hours?

Residents in some North Dakota towns have less than half as many hours to cast their ballots as those in New York State.

10 Members of Congress Who Are Also TV Shows

Michael Grimm. Mark Sanford. Duncan Hunter. Paul Ryan. The 113th Congress is full of U.S. Representatives with television program namesakes.

The Third Wheel: States with the Most 3rd Party US Senate Candidacies

New Jersey leads a pack of Northeastern and Midwestern states with the highest rate of independent and third party candidates in U.S. Senate elections over the past century.

Unusual Exits: 13 Members of Congress Who Drowned

Two congressmen drowned while in office; one former U.S. Representative drowned on the Titanic and another on Independence Day.

Scoreboard: Navy 21, Army 14 (Presidential Commencement Addresses)

Although it is 43 years its junior, the Naval Academy has hosted 50 percent more commencement addresses by sitting U.S. Presidents than West Point.

Weiner Has Political Pedigree for NYC Mayoral Run (But So Did Hearst)

The former congressman once again seeks to become the 12th ex- or sitting member of the U.S. House or U.S. Senate to subsequently serve as mayor of New York City.

The Birth States of U.S. Representatives (113th Congress)

Eight U.S. House delegations boast an all homegrown membership, led by Iowa and Mississippi; five delegations come in at 25 percent or less including Virginia and Minnesota.

House Democrats Inch Closer to Becoming a Two-State Caucus

Californians and New Yorkers will comprise a record percentage of the Democratic caucus when the 113th Congress convenes in January at nearly 30 percent.

Big GOP Gain in NY-09 Mirrors 50-Year Average in New York US House Special Elections

Turner's 29-point net bump from the 2010 general is just 1-point shy of the 30-point average gain against the vacating party since 1962.

New York US House Special Elections Average 30-Point Swing Over the Last Half-Century

The vacating incumbent's party has shed an average of 30 points from the previous general election's MoV in New York special election races since 1962.

Bill O'Reilly Errs: Weiner Represents 40th Most Conservative Democratic U.S. House District

NY-09 not the "very, very far left district" O'Reilly claims it to be.

The Camera Does Not Lie: A Content Analysis of Anthony Weiner's Official House Photo Album

The camera catches Weiner without a suit jacket 50 percent of the time, his shirt sleeves rolled up in 37 percent of photos, and 23 percent of snapshots cannot confirm the congressman is wearing trousers.

The Quotable Weiner: A Second Look

He said what last month?

Gillibrand Scores Biggest Fundraising Surge Among 2012 U.S. Senate Incumbents

New York junior Senator jumps from #17 to #5 for cash on hand among 2012 U.S. Senate incumbents last quarter.

With Hochul Victory, 1 in 5 Democrats First Entered US House via Special Election

15 percent of current U.S. Representatives (63 members) were first elected by special election including 20 percent of the current Democratic caucus

Media Misfires During NY-26 Election Night Coverage

Erroneous statements abound during coverage and analysis of NY-26 Tuesday evening

NY-26: One in Four U.S. House Seats Flipped in Special Elections Since 2002

Special elections have seen 9 of 37 seats change parties over the last 9+ years, or 24.3 percent of all races

House Republican Committee Chairs Enjoy Huge Spike in Fundraising

Collective contributions to 21 GOP House Committee chairs up 93 percent in Q1 2011 from same period in 2009

Which States Produce the Most U.S. Senators?

Over the last 100 years Ohio, New York, and Missouri have given birth to the most Senators, while Ohio, Vermont and Mississippi boast the largest percentage of home-born Senators

Race, Not Party, Defines Charlie Rangel Censure Vote

Just 25 percent of racial minorities in the U.S. House (and only 1 black) voted for Rangel censure, compared to 92 percent of whites and 87 percent of white Democrats

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Political Crumbs

The Second Time Around

Former Republican Congressman Bob Beauprez became the seventh major party or second place gubernatorial candidate in Colorado to get a second chance at the office when he narrowly won his party's nomination last month. Two of the previous six candidates were successful. Democrat Alva Adams lost his first gubernatorial bid to Benjamin Eaton in 1884, but was victorious two years later against William Meyer. Democrat Charles Johnson placed third in 1894 behind Republican Albert McIntyre and Populist incumbent Governor David Waite but returned as the Fusion (Democrat/Populist) nominee in 1898 and defeated GOPer Henry Wolcott. Gubernatorial candidates who received a second chance but lost both general elections include Democrat Thomas Patterson (1888, 1914), Progressive Edward Costigan (1912, 1914), Republican Donald Brotzman (1954, 1956), and Republican David Strickland (1978, 1986).


How Are the Plurality Winners Doing?

Nearly 40 percent of plurality winners of U.S. Senate elections lose their seat in the next election cycle. Will that happen to any of the three such incumbents on the ballot in 2014? Recent polling suggests Democrats Al Franken of Minnesota, Mark Begich of Alaska, and Jeff Merkley of Oregon all currently have an advantage over their nominated/frontrunning GOP opponents, but each is flirting with plurality support once again. Franken led endorsed GOPer Mike McFadden 48 to 42 percent in a new SurveyUSA poll while the polling group showed Merkley with a 50 to 32 percent advantage over Monica Wehby. Begich led each of the three major GOP candidates in last month's PPP survey: 42 to 37 percent over Daniel Sullivan, 41 to 33 percent over Mead Treadwell, and 43 to 27 percent over Joe Miller.


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