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Pennsylvania


Is There a Presidential Drag On Gubernatorial Elections?

Only five of the 20 presidents to serve since 1900 have seen their party win a majority of gubernatorial elections during their administrations, and only one since JFK.

Which States Have the Highest Gubernatorial Reelection Rates?

Six states have not seen a governor lose a reelection bid over the last half century with Vermont and Connecticut boasting the most impressive incumbency advantage resum├ęs.

Tom's Club: Pennsylvania's Popular Gubernatorial Name

Pennsylvania has been governed by a "Tom" or "Thomas" for nearly 31 years collectively since statehood - more than any other name - and will add to that total in 2015.

Allyson Schwartz Could Set Pennsylvania Democratic Record Even With Loss

No female Democratic candidate for governor in Pennsylvania has eclipsed the 20 percent mark in a primary to date; only seven of 165 Democratic and GOP primary candidates in state history have been women.

10 Members of Congress Who Are Also TV Shows

Michael Grimm. Mark Sanford. Duncan Hunter. Paul Ryan. The 113th Congress is full of U.S. Representatives with television program namesakes.

Obama's America: State References in SOTU Addresses

When searching for episodic examples to bolster his policies in SOTU addresses, the president turns to the battleground states of North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Ohio more than any other.

Can Pennsylvania Democrats Pick Up Any US House Seats with Corbett Loss?

If Pennsylvania Democrats win the governor's mansion without netting two U.S. House seats, the party will set a record for shortest gubernatorial coattails in congressional races in state history.

Pennsylvania Democrats Hope to Reverse History in 2014 Gubernatorial Race

Pennsylvanians have elected a governor of the party of the sitting president in only 1 of the last 19 contests dating back to 1938; Democrats are 1-16 since 1860 with a Democrat in the White House.

Unusual Exits: 6 Members of Congress Killed by Accidental Gunshots

Hunting moose...hunting ducks...cleaning a shotgun...a half-dozen members of Congress learned too late about the importance of firearms safety.

The Historically Undersized Pennsylvania Democratic US House Delegation

The 2012 cycle yielded the lowest number and percentage of major party Pennsylvania U.S. House members from the state's winning presidential candidate since the birth of the two-party system in 1828.

Blast from the Past: Margolies Eyes Deep Pennsylvania History in 2014 Bid

115 Pennsylvania U.S. Representatives served interrupted stints in the chamber, including seven with gaps of 20+ years.

Sestak Seeks First US Senate Rematch in Pennsylvania History

If Sestak wins the 2016 Democratic nomination he will be the first major party candidate to secure a rematch in a Pennsylvania U.S. Senate race in the popular vote era.

Could Allyson Schwartz Make History in Pennsylvania?

A Schwartz gubernatorial bid could bring Pennsylvania its first female governor as well as its first successful run by a sitting or former Democratic U.S. Representative.

Battleground States of the Century: Missouri, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin

Only seven states have had more than half of their presidential election contests decided by single digits over the last 100 years: Missouri, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Ohio, New Hampshire, Delaware, and Oregon.

Romney Sets Unwanted Record in Sweep of Northeastern Primaries

Prior to Romney, no presumptive GOP nominee has failed to win 60 percent of the vote playing out the primary string after his last major challenger exited the race.

Presidential Battleground States by the Numbers Since 1968

Wisconsin and Pennsylvania lead the way with nine races decided by single-digits over the last 11 presidential election cycles; Missouri and Oregon are next with eight

Nancy Pelosi 1 of 8 House Democrats to Win by Bigger Margin in 2010 than 2008

Only 3 percent of 230 Democratic U.S. House incumbents on the ballot increased their margin of victory in 2010 compared to 2008; Nancy Pelosi had the second largest increase

Reapportionment Winners and Losers Through the Years

Pennsylvania (-17 seats) and New York (-16 seats) have lost the largest number of seats from their peak U.S. House delegations; the Keystone State is slated to lose a seat again for a 9th consecutive census period

The Top 50 Most Competitive U.S. House Districts in the Nation (2002-2008)

Jim Gerlach's PA-06 seat is the only U.S. House district in the nation decided by less than 10 points in each of the last four election cycles; Democrats currently hold 35 of the Top 50 most competitive seats

Will Arlen Specter Win in 2010?

When Pennsylvania U.S. Senator Arlen Specter switched from the Republican to the Democratic Party on Tuesday morning, the first question asked was not why he bolted from the GOP, but how his change in party affiliation will impact the Democratic majority's quest for a filibuster-proof 60 votes on key legislation...

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Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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