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Tennessee


Wyoming and Tennessee: The Nation's Political Naysayers?

Ten states have voted against the party of the sitting president in every gubernatorial election since at least 1994 led by Wyoming and Tennessee; just two states have voted for the president's party during that span.

A Year in Smart Politics

A look back at some of the reports that made headlines from Smart Politics in 2014.

Which States Have the Highest Gubernatorial Reelection Rates?

Six states have not seen a governor lose a reelection bid over the last half century with Vermont and Connecticut boasting the most impressive incumbency advantage resum├ęs.

Alexander Records Weakest Primary Win for GOP US Senator in Tennessee History

Alexander becomes the fifth Republican U.S. Senator to set a low water mark for an incumbent in a GOP primary election this cycle.

Meet the 4 Senators Who Don't Use a Home State Address in FEC Filings

While four Senators file from addresses inside the beltway, one Midwesterner files from his hometown, population 373.

7 Gubernatorial Election Double-Takes

The Idaho GOP didn't give us Labrador vs. Otter in 2014, so Smart Politics takes a look back at some eyebrow raising surname matchups in gubernatorial electoral history.

Alexander: 1st Tennessee GOP US Senator to Face Viable Primary Challenger

The Volunteer State's previous Republican U.S. Senate incumbents won their primary contests by an average of 91 points.

Meet the Three House Women Who Go by "Congressman"

Republicans Marsha Blackburn, Diane Black, and Cynthia Lummis are the lone holdouts from self-identifying as a "Congresswoman."

City Pages Errs in Latest Pawlenty Snark

Tennessee not quite as Republican-friendly as article suggests

Tennessee Primary Live Blog

2:51 p.m. Last polls close in Tennessee at 7:00 p.m. CST. The Democrats will allocate 68 of its 85 convention delegates based on the primary vote: 44 delegates are allocated proportionately to presidential candidates, while on March 8th, 24 delegates are allocated to presidential candidates based on the statewide vote....



Political Crumbs

73 Months and Counting

January's preliminary Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers show Minnesota's unemployment rate of 3.7 percent was once again lower than Wisconsin's 5.0 percent. That marks the 73rd consecutive month in which Minnesota has boasted a lower jobless rate than its neighbor to the east dating back to January 2009 including each of the last 67 months by at least one point. The Gopher State has now edged Wisconsin in the employment border battle for 204 of the last 216 months dating back to February 1997. Wisconsin only managed a lower unemployment rate than Minnesota for the 12 months of 2008 during this 18-year span.


Two Dakotas, One Voice?

For each of the last 24 presidential elections since 1920, North and South Dakota have voted in unison - casting their ballots for the same nominee. For 21 of these cycles (including each of the last 12 since 1968) Republicans carried the Dakotas with just three cycles going to the Democrats (1932, 1936, and 1964). This streak stands in contrast to the first few decades after statehood when North and South Dakota supported different nominees in four of the first seven cycles. North Dakota narrowly backed Populist James Weaver in 1892 while South Dakota voted for incumbent Republican Benjamin Harrison. In 1896, it was North Dakota backing GOPer William McKinley while South Dakota supported Democrat William Jennings Bryan by less than 200 votes. North Dakota voted Democratic in 1912 and 1916 supporting Woodrow Wilson while South Dakota cast its Electoral College votes for Progressive Teddy Roosevelt and Republican Charles Hughes respectively.


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