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Will a New Female Governor Be Elected in 2014?

Up to five female major party nominees will be on the ballot this November attempting to win their first gubernatorial election.

Republican US Senators Hitting Historic Lows in Primaries

Four Republicans have already set state records for low water marks by a sitting GOP U.S. Senator in a primary election - after just eight contests

Hall Makes History: 1st Texas GOP US Rep to Lose Renomination Bid

Prior to Hall's runoff loss, 256 straight incumbent Republican U.S. House members from the Lone Star State had launched successful renomination campaigns since 1870.

Ralph Hall Faces Uneasy Odds in Texas Runoff

Second-place primary finishers have won 16 of 35 Texas Republican U.S. House runoffs since 1992; Hall might become just the second Texas GOP U.S. Representative to lose his party's nomination in history.

Cornyn Records Weakest Ever Primary Win for Texas GOP US Senator

He may have cruised to a 40-point win, but the two-term Republican incumbent was still less than 10 points from a runoff while recording the worst ever primary performance by a Texas Republican Senator.

Ralph Hall Could Become Just 2nd Ever Texas GOP US Rep to Lose Nomination Bid

If he loses a May runoff, Hall would become only the second of 258 incumbent Republican U.S. House members from the Lone Star State to fail to secure their party's nomination since statehood.

10 Members of Congress Who Are Also TV Shows

Michael Grimm. Mark Sanford. Duncan Hunter. Paul Ryan. The 113th Congress is full of U.S. Representatives with television program namesakes.

Steve Stockman's 12 Percent Solution

Only 4 of 31 Texas U.S. Senate candidacies by sitting or ex-U.S. Representatives have been successful in the direct election era.

Pollsters Ignoring Rick Perry's 2016 'Campaign'

Only two of 13 GOP 2016 primary polls conducted since April have included the Texas governor's name.

Who's Still Covering Cruz?

The Daily Caller and POLITICO by far led the way with the most front page stories this weekend on the controversial Texas U.S. Senator.

Perry Will Retire with 10th Longest Gubernatorial Tenure in US History

The Texas governor will climb nine more spots on the all-time list with 5,144 days in office under his belt upon his retirement in January 2015.

The Top 50 Longest-Serving Governors of All Time

One active governor tops the list, while another will crack the Top 10 by the end of his term; two current west coast governors will climb onto the list later this year .

Presidential Commencement Addresses: Notre Dame Reigns

Ohio State will host its third commencement address by a sitting president this spring, but that's only half the number tallied by Notre Dame.

Duckworth, Castro Lead House Freshman Class in Early Media Buzz

While most new U.S. Representatives have lain low during their first month in office, a half-dozen freshmen have received more than half the media coverage of their entire class.

Texas GOP Senate Runoff Has 2nd Lowest Decline in Turnout from Primary Since 1950

Only the 1972 Democratic runoff between former Senator Ralph Yarborough and Barefoot Sanders had a smaller drop in turnout of the 11 such U.S. Senate runoffs conducted since 1950

Ted Cruz: Time Was on His Side

The nine week gap between the primary and runoff elections is the longest for any U.S. Senate run-off in Texas history.

Broadcast Media in Love with Republican Governors in 2012

GOP governors land the Top 10 spots for the most broadcast reports mentioning their names since January, led by Rick Perry, Chris Christie, Scott Walker, and Rick Scott.

GOP Challengers Close Historical Gap But Fall Short in Texas US House Primaries

Tea Party candidates cut into Republican incumbents' victory margins by levels not seen in at least a generation.

Fun Facts in Texas U.S. Senate Primary Election History

Nearly 40 percent of Lone Star State Democratic primaries for U.S. Senate have gone to a runoff since 1916 with the second place candidate winning in more than half of the runoff elections.

US House Tenure Varies Wildly Across the 50 States Throughout History

U.S. Representatives from western states serve an average of 2.9 years longer than those from northeastern states throughout history.

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Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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