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Which States Have the Longest and Shortest Election Day Voting Hours?

Residents in some North Dakota towns have less than half as many hours to cast their ballots as those in New York State.

Which States Are Bellwethers for Partisan Control of the US Senate?

Two states - Rhode Island and Nevada - have elected U.S. Senators into the majority party of the subsequent Congress 75+ percent of the time over the last 100 years; Virginia has done so in each of the last six elections.

The Final Six: Which State Will Next Elect Its 1st Woman to the US House?

Six states have yet to elect a woman to the U.S. House of Representatives, but one is poised to be crossed off that list in 2014.

7 Gubernatorial Election Double-Takes

The Idaho GOP didn't give us Labrador vs. Otter in 2014, so Smart Politics takes a look back at some eyebrow raising surname matchups in gubernatorial electoral history.

The Five-Timers Club: Gubernatorial Edition

Thirty-seven governors in U.S. history were elected into office at least five times but only 10 served in the 20th or 21st Centuries; four members of the Club are alive today.

How High Will Rand Paul's Fundraising Skyrocket After Filibuster?

Bernie Sanders' daily fundraising tally increased by 61-fold for the fortnight after his December 10, 2010 eight-and-a-half hour speech.

Record-Setting 3rd Party and Independent Candidacies Abound in 2012 US Senate Races

Five candidates set all-time statewide records for non-major party candidates in U.S. Senate races this cycle.

Will Obama or Romney Break Any Records Tuesday?

Obama set the all-time Democratic presidential statewide victory margin marks in Delaware and Vermont (and D.C.) four years ago.

Will Vermont's 27-Cycle GOP Presidential Streak Ever Be Broken?

Nine states currently hold an 11-cycle streak backing the Republican nominee but cannot tie Vermont's record until the Election of 2072.

Which States Produce the Most U.S. Senators?

Over the last 100 years Ohio, New York, and Missouri have given birth to the most Senators, while Ohio, Vermont and Mississippi boast the largest percentage of home-born Senators

Third Party U.S. House Candidates Spike to Largest Midterm Election Mark Since 1934

With an average of more than one candidate per district, it has been over 75 years since this many independent and third party U.S. House candidates appeared on midterm general election ballots

Live Blog: Vermont Primary

6:00 p.m. NBC News, Fox News, and CNN all project Barack Obama and John McCain the winners of the Vermont primary. This marks Obama's 11th straight victory. Obama has now won 24 states plus D.C. and the Virgin Islands. McCain has won 17 states plus D.C. 6:07 p.m. Despite Obama's...

Poll Roundup: The March 4th Primaries (Democrats)

With less than 72 hours before polls close in four primary states on Tuesday, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton appear to be headed for a draw. With Obama leading in the delegate count, a draw would continue his path to the Democratic nomination. However, if Clinton wins 2 states and/or...



Political Crumbs

The Second Time Around

Former Republican Congressman Bob Beauprez became the seventh major party or second place gubernatorial candidate in Colorado to get a second chance at the office when he narrowly won his party's nomination last month. Two of the previous six candidates were successful. Democrat Alva Adams lost his first gubernatorial bid to Benjamin Eaton in 1884, but was victorious two years later against William Meyer. Democrat Charles Johnson placed third in 1894 behind Republican Albert McIntyre and Populist incumbent Governor David Waite but returned as the Fusion (Democrat/Populist) nominee in 1898 and defeated GOPer Henry Wolcott. Gubernatorial candidates who received a second chance but lost both general elections include Democrat Thomas Patterson (1888, 1914), Progressive Edward Costigan (1912, 1914), Republican Donald Brotzman (1954, 1956), and Republican David Strickland (1978, 1986).


How Are the Plurality Winners Doing?

Nearly 40 percent of plurality winners of U.S. Senate elections lose their seat in the next election cycle. Will that happen to any of the three such incumbents on the ballot in 2014? Recent polling suggests Democrats Al Franken of Minnesota, Mark Begich of Alaska, and Jeff Merkley of Oregon all currently have an advantage over their nominated/frontrunning GOP opponents, but each is flirting with plurality support once again. Franken led endorsed GOPer Mike McFadden 48 to 42 percent in a new SurveyUSA poll while the polling group showed Merkley with a 50 to 32 percent advantage over Monica Wehby. Begich led each of the three major GOP candidates in last month's PPP survey: 42 to 37 percent over Daniel Sullivan, 41 to 33 percent over Mead Treadwell, and 43 to 27 percent over Joe Miller.


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