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Bridging the gap between scientific research and science policy

Broad Impacts is a new group that aims to open a conversation about the important issues surrounding scientific research in this country: how science is funded and practiced, how scientific results inform policy, and how science is perceived and utilized in the public sphere. Scientific researchers are often far removed from the policy discussions that affect them directly and are influenced by their work. We'd like to change that! At Broad Impacts events, which start later this month, people from the science world and the policy world will have the opportunity to jointly tackle the science policy issues that affect all of us.

If you are a scientist, scientist-in-training, policy aficionado, or just a fan of thinking outside the scientific bubble, then this group is for you! All are welcome to attend and participate - having a diverse set of opinions will allow for a more engaging discussion. No background in science policy is required (although experts in policy are encouraged to participate).

Scheduled sessions:
Thursday, July 21st from 3:30-5pm, Molecular and Cellular Biology Building 2-120. Topic: What is science policy and why should we care?

Thursday, August 4th, 3:30-5pm, Molecular and Cellular Biology Building 2-120. Topic: Communication of science to the public and lawmakers

Thursday, August 18th, 3:30-5pm, Molecular and Cellular Biology Building 2-122. Topic: Basic versus translational research

Please email Tess Kornfield at kornf002@umn.edu if you plan to attend so you can be added to the email list. For more information, check out Broad Impacts on Facebook and follow the blog!

Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs
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