Recently in Translational Research Resources Category

Five research projects were awarded through the Translational Product Development Fund (TPDF) program, a joint initiative between CTSI and the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCaTS), in conjunction with the Minnesota Partnership for Biotechnology and Medical Genomics (MNP). The program supports health research projects that intend to develop a novel therapeutic compound, device, diagnostic, or IT product, and have the potential to be commercialized.

Congratulations to the newest awardees!

TPDF award recipients

Project Title: Combination Radiofrequency and Electroporation Energy for Balloon-Based Ablation and Drug Delivery: A Novel Treatment Modality for Atrial Fibrillation

  • Samuel Asirvatham, MD, Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester
  • David R. Holmes, Jr., MD, MACC, Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester

Project Title: Minimally Invasive Pericardial Resection to Treat Heart Failure

  • Barry Borlaug, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine/Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester

Project Title: A Novel Antimicrobial Peptide for Drug-resistant Bacterial Infections

  • Sven-Ulrik Gorr, PhD, Professor, College of Dentistry, Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, University of Minnesota

Project Title: Novel Biotechnology for Rapid, Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Bacterial Infection

  • Valerie Pierre, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota
  • Robin Patel, MD, Professor of Medicine, Professor of Microbiology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester

Project Title: Development of Hexyl-Benzyl-Biguanide for Breast Cancer Therapeutics

  • David Potter, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota
  • Robert Schumacher, PhD, Scientific Director, Center for Translational Medicine, Academic Health Center, University of Minnesota

CTSI has released RFAs for the following funding programs:

Translational Product Development Fund

  • Supports health research projects that intend to develop a novel therapeutic compound, device, diagnostic, or IT product, and have the potential to be commercialized.
  • Open to University of Minnesota and/or Mayo Clinic researchers
  • Offers either up to $50K to assess feasibility or establish merit, or up to $200K to advance past feasibility toward commercialization (i.e., funding for research that would specifically support the formation of a start-up company or license agreement).

Mandatory letters of intent due May 1.

View the RFA | Learn more


Pediatric Medical Device Translational Grant Program

  • Supports the development of pediatric medical devices, with the ultimate goal of improving pediatric patient outcomes and quality of life through technology-driven medical solutions.
  • Open to University of Minnesota faculty, including affiliated faculty at the VA, HCMC, Regions Hospital, and the Children's Hospitals of Minnesota.
  • Offers each funded project a maximum of $50K for one year.

Mandatory letters of intent due May 1.

View RFA | Learn more

The Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and Pediatric Device Innovation Consortium (PDIC) have announced the inaugural awardees of the Pediatric Medical Device Translational Grant Program.

The new funding program supports the development of pediatric medical devices, with the ultimate goal of improving pediatric patient outcomes and quality of life through technology-driven medical solutions.

The program's partners, CTSI's Office of Discovery and Translation (ODAT) and the Pediatric Device Innovation Consortium (PDIC), will provide the funded investigators with work strategy guidance, frequent feedback, and access to comprehensive internal and external services.

Congratulations to the 2014 grant recipients:

David Polly, MD and Charles Ledonio, MD
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School
Project Title: 3D Rendering of the Thoracic Cage from Plain 2D Radiographs of Scoliosis in Children

Arif Somani, MD
Department of Pediatrics, Medical School
Project Title: Intra-pulmonary Aerosol Generator for Drug Delivery in Intubated Patients

Robert Tranquillo, PhD
Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Science & Engineering
Project Title: Preclinical Demonstration of Growth Capacity of a Tissue-engineered RVOT Graft

CRC Orientation screen shot-Recruitment course.pngCoordinators who support clinical research teams at the U of M and Fairview have new resources to help them be more successful, thanks to expansions to the Clinical Research Coordinator (CRC) Orientation program.

The online training program now offers a new course about recruiting research participants (shown above), to help coordinators more effectively attract volunteers for clinical trials, and ensure they have a positive experience.

"Recruiting patients is vital to a trial's success, and sites invest a significant amount of time and resources on recruitment activities. I'm very exited about the development of the CRC Orientation program's latest course, which is designed to provide CRCs with the skills, training, and real-world examples that can help them more effectively recruit and retain research participants," says Denise Windenburg, Program Director of the U of M's Cardiovascular research team. Windenburg collaborates on the training program with other content experts and the Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

Other new program features include an online forum that allows the U of M and Fairview CRC community to discover, share, and discuss resources, as well as digital badges that enable CRCs to showcase training progress, such as on their LinkedIn profile.

Recruitment is one of many courses included in the module, which addresses a wide range of topics, from good clinical practice and research ethics to policies and regulatory considerations. Courses can be taken anytime, anywhere, and are free to CRCs at the U of M.

"We originally created the CRC Orientation program to help drive high-quality research, while also supporting the career development of the coordinators who are critical to a clinical study's success," says Michelle Lamere, assistant director for CTSI's Education, Training, and Research Career Development function (CTSI-Ed). "We continuously add new features to keep delivering on this promise, and respond to the evolving needs of the CRC community."

The Clinical and Translational Science Institute developed and manages this program, while CRC experts and research managers serve as content experts, including for the new recruitment-focused course.

Visit the CRC Orientation page to learn more. To enroll, email crctrain@umn.edu or visit the CRC Orientation Moodle page (requires U of M login).

The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) is announcing an open opportunity to submit proposals to collaborate with the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases (TRND) program.

The TRND program performs preclinical and early clinical development of new drugs for rare and neglected tropical diseases, and develops new technologies and paradigms to improve the efficiency of therapeutic development for these disorders. TRND seeks collaborative partnerships with academic laboratories, not-for-profit organizations, and for-profit companies. This is not a grant program, and no extramural funds will be provided.

Please visit the TRND website and the related NIH Guide Notice for complete details regarding program scope, eligibility, and application process.

Letters of Intent are due no later than September 16, and full proposals must be submitted by September 30.