Recently in Translational Research Resources Category

CRC Orientation screen shot-Recruitment course.pngCoordinators who support clinical research teams at the U of M and Fairview have new resources to help them be more successful, thanks to expansions to the Clinical Research Coordinator (CRC) Orientation program.

The online training program now offers a new course about recruiting research participants (shown above), to help coordinators more effectively attract volunteers for clinical trials, and ensure they have a positive experience.

"Recruiting patients is vital to a trial's success, and sites invest a significant amount of time and resources on recruitment activities. I'm very exited about the development of the CRC Orientation program's latest course, which is designed to provide CRCs with the skills, training, and real-world examples that can help them more effectively recruit and retain research participants," says Denise Windenburg, Program Director of the U of M's Cardiovascular research team. Windenburg collaborates on the training program with other content experts and the Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

Other new program features include an online forum that allows the U of M and Fairview CRC community to discover, share, and discuss resources, as well as digital badges that enable CRCs to showcase training progress, such as on their LinkedIn profile.

Recruitment is one of many courses included in the module, which addresses a wide range of topics, from good clinical practice and research ethics to policies and regulatory considerations. Courses can be taken anytime, anywhere, and are free to CRCs at the U of M.

"We originally created the CRC Orientation program to help drive high-quality research, while also supporting the career development of the coordinators who are critical to a clinical study's success," says Michelle Lamere, assistant director for CTSI's Education, Training, and Research Career Development function (CTSI-Ed). "We continuously add new features to keep delivering on this promise, and respond to the evolving needs of the CRC community."

The Clinical and Translational Science Institute developed and manages this program, while CRC experts and research managers serve as content experts, including for the new recruitment-focused course.

Visit the CRC Orientation page to learn more. To enroll, email crctrain@umn.edu or visit the CRC Orientation Moodle page (requires U of M login).

The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) is announcing an open opportunity to submit proposals to collaborate with the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases (TRND) program.

The TRND program performs preclinical and early clinical development of new drugs for rare and neglected tropical diseases, and develops new technologies and paradigms to improve the efficiency of therapeutic development for these disorders. TRND seeks collaborative partnerships with academic laboratories, not-for-profit organizations, and for-profit companies. This is not a grant program, and no extramural funds will be provided.

Please visit the TRND website and the related NIH Guide Notice for complete details regarding program scope, eligibility, and application process.

Letters of Intent are due no later than September 16, and full proposals must be submitted by September 30.

By receiving the Clinical and Translational Science Award, the University of Minnesota is now required by NCATS and NIH to ensure an acknowledgment of the CTSA in any publications that result from UMN CTSI assistance with a project.

How to acknowledge CTSA support

All publications resulting from the use of CTSI resources are required to credit CTSA by using the text below.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health Award Number UL1TR000114. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

When to acknowledge CTSA support
Please note that assistance is not limited to monetary support (e.g., pilot grant funds), but also includes use of CTSI space, consultation with CTSI faculty or staff, and use of any CTSI Internal Service Organization services (Project Management, Clinical Research Coordinators, Nursing and Nutritional Services, Biostatistical support, and Regulatory assistance such as IND/IDE support, clinical trial monitoring, or ClinicalTrials.gov support).

Congratulations to the recipients of CTSI's Fall 2012 Translational Grant Awards! This round of awards, designed to facilitate the highest quality translational research, was dedicated to junior investigators at the University of Minnesota.

Funded investigators will partner with a Project Development Team from the CTSI Office of Discovery and Translation (ODAT) that will provide project mapping and translational research expertise to facilitate the achievement of specific metrics and endpoints.

Peter Dosa, PhD, College of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Institute for Therapeutics Discovery and Development
Development of novel therapeutics for glaucoma

Michael Linden, MD, PhD,
Medical School, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology
Identifying immunophenotypic markers suitable for clinical laboratory testing for early identification of bortezomib resistance in human multiple myeloma

Ann Parr, MD, PhD, Medical School, Neurosurgery Department
Autologous OPCs for transplantation into human spinal cord injury

Valerie Pierre, PhD, College of Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry
Siderophore aptasensors for immediate point-of-care diagnosis of urinary tract infection

Visit the CTSI website to learn about current and future funding opportunities.

The CTSI Office of Discovery and Translation (ODAT) announces a new pilot funding opportunity for junior investigators conducting early stage translational research, which is defined as research focused on transitioning a basic science discovery to the clinical setting. Awardees will partner with a Project Development Team (PDT) that will provide project mapping and translational research expertise to facilitate the achievement of specific metrics and endpoints.

Applications are due September 17.

View the Request for Applications (RFA) to learn more.

Questions? Contact Sandra Wells, PhD, Assistant Director, CTSI Office of Discovery and Translation at (612) 625-3073 or smwells@umn.edu.