January 8, 2006

Iapetus Saves Manhattan

Chapter Twelve

Dr. LeFleur and Dr. Maland watched the two monsters battle from the relative safety of a circling helicopter. They watched as the Iapetus followed the ultra-yeti into the river and disappeared from view.

"Get closer!" shouted General Mann to the Pilot. "We don't want to lose track of them!"

"Yes sir!" replied the helicopter pilot.

The helicopter pilot got closer to the river, but the two monsters remained hidden from view. However, at the point where the two beasts entered the river, the water sloshed and bubbled. It was obvious that the two beasts fought at that point.

"Iapetus is an aquatic animal," remarked Dr. Maland. "He's definitely got the advantage in the river."

"The two monsters are enormous," replied Dr. LeFleur. "There is little room to maneuver in the river there... But I believe you are right."

"It's a shame," sighed Dr. Maland.

"Yes it is."

Suddenly, the helicopter pilot pulled back on the stick sharply tossing the occupants about. A giant white beast flew out of the water and landed on the rubble that once was one of the four Agency towers. The beast flew quite high and smashed into the rubble that rocked the city for blocks. He laid there bleeding from cuts on his arms and his torso.

Slowly Iapetus emerged from the river. He once again fully erected his back spines and gave his mighty roar. He slowly walked the few blocks to where the ultra-yeti landed.

Now the young soaking wet monster had lost his swagger. He was no longer in a rampage mode. Destruction was no longer a priority and it showed in his manner. Everyone in the helicopter agreed, the young beast was afraid for his life.

Before Iapetus could reach him, the ultra-yeti rolled off the pile of rubble and kept the Erastus Corning Tower between the ancient monster and himself. He looked like he was going to use the tower as a squirrel uses a tree.

Iapetus was still in no hurry to continue the fight. He entered the Empire State Plaza with confidence, but he knew that the young ultra-yeti was a dangerous adversary. With a steady and cautious walk, he approached the tall Albany building.

The soaking wet ultra-yeti looked pathetic hiding behind the tower. The tower could not offer him much protection. An obstacle that with a little effort could be swept aside.

The two beasts circled the tower guarding against the move of the other. At the same time, they were measuring each other up and deciding on their own next move.

The ultra-yeti broke the stalemate. He shook the water from his fur like a dog. This action caused Iapetus to hesitate and the young monster crashed through the tower and tackled his opponent.

The tangle of beast and steel and concrete crashed to the ground with an enormous crash. The claws of the young beast tore at the scales of Iapetus. However, the claws of the young monster could not penetrate the hide of the old beast.

Iapetus's claws on the other hand, tore through the tough flesh of the ultra-yeti. This gambit had backfired for the young beast and he began to struggle to break free of the embrace. He grabbed enormous chunks of concrete to smash into his foe, but the wrestling match continued.

Finally, the young beast got a hold of a long piece of twisted steel that used to be part of the building that he had just toppled. With a swing of desperation, he smacked Iapetus in the head with the weapon, and he was free from the other monster's claws.

The ultra-yeti scrambled to his feet with his weapon still in his hand. In an axe-like swing, he brought it down as Iapetus attempted to get up. It once again smashed upon the monster's head. Iapetus was stunned.

The twisted steel was a formidable weapon and the ultra-yeti was poised to use it again. Over his head it went and back down. This time it missed its mark as Iapetus rolled away before the weapon could fall.

Dazed from the blows to the head Iapetus managed to reach his feet. He was a bit unsteady as the young beast swung the steel girder wildly at him. He avoided several blows as he attempted to shake the cobwebs from his mind.

The weapon wielded by the young beast had turned the tides, and he continued to swing it at the green monster. Iapetus managed to avoid most of the blows, but he felt the danger of his situation.

Eventually, one of the swings caught Iapetus under the arm smacked into his ribs. He emitted a groan, but managed to pin the weapon under his arm. With his other arm, he grabbed it.

There was a brief struggle for the weapon, but using his tail, Iapetus swept the feet right out from under the ultra-yeti. The young monster still held onto the weapon as he fell. Unfortunately, this pinned the young beast to the ground. The old monster slid down the length of the girder and sunk his teeth into the young beast's neck.

The ultra-yeti struggled to break free, but the jaws of the old sea monster were strong. The young monster tried to twist and struggle to break free, but he felt his strength being drained away. Slowly the struggles began to decrease as the life slipped from his body.

Eventually, the girder crashed to the ground and the ultra-yeti died. Iapetus gave a sorrowful cry. There was no flex in his spines. He mourned the passage of the young beast and trudged to the Hudson River. He jumped in and swam off.

The helicopter landed in the park where it had picked up Dr. Maland. The men that were in the helicopter walked over towards the dead ultra-yeti. The beast and the rubble that once was several buildings awed them.

"He was just trying to survive," remarked Dr. LeFleur.

"He was a remarkable animal," replied Dr. Maland.

"Look at the damage!" insisted General Mann. "This monster is responsible for a tremendous amount of destruction all along the Hudson River! It'll take years to rebuild and billions of dollars!"

"He may have been happy in his nest in the woods," replied Dr. LeFleur. "We don't know what his natural habits were. We could have possibly coexisted, but you had to try and kill him."

"He was a threat!" exclaimed General Mann.

"He was a force of nature," replied Dr. Maland.

"He was unleashed by humanity's unwillingness to accept itself as part of nature," continued Dr. LeFleur. "Humans have this silly notion that they were granted dominion over the earth. Nature, sometimes gently and sometimes with huge fury, informs is that we are not in charge."

"Bah!" replied General Mann.

"And still..." started Dr. Maland. "...we don't listen."

The End.

Posted by deg at January 8, 2006 11:00 AM

Comments:

Epilogue:
The governor of New York decided that the best way to raise funds inorder to rebuild the devasted cities was to open "Yeti-burger" stands across the state. It was a huge success with the introduction of the "Ultra-meal" featuring free "Yeti" carseat covers and shag rugs with each order.

The president of Canada seeing the success of the new fast food chain in America determined to opened their own "Yeti-another Burger" stands. Unfortunately, the meat obtained from the mother Ultra-yeti was not as delectable as the babies tender flesh and the debt accrued from the cause left the northern country awash in coarse Yeti-fur coats, slippers, and unpalatable meat.

Doug great story. Maybe you should see if Toho is
interested.

Posted by: Dwayne at January 11, 2006 8:35 AM

Thanks Dwayne! What to write next, that is the question... Perhaps something with the line "You're making me sad Mr. McGee..."

Posted by: Doug at January 11, 2006 8:37 AM

This is basically King Kong vs. Gojira, no?

Dwayne, Canada does not have a president. We have a Prime Minister, like the U.K.

Yeti is the Nepalese name for the abonimable snowman. The N.American name is Sasquatch.

Have you ever read Alpha Flight? There is a Sasquatch character in it, and also Snowbird once assumed the Sasquatch form.... supposedly one of the Great Beasts or something... it's been a while, but I know the writers made reference to god-like mythological beasts of the North.

Posted by: Jules at November 30, 2006 10:49 AM

Thanks for visiting Jules. While I wouldn't say it is King Kong vs. Gojira, it is of that genre. It is definitely part of the influence for the story.

Sasquatch in my neck of the woods is often called "Big Foot" and I feel that creature is completely different than the abominable snowman of Nepal. Further, I prefer the Nepalese name to the North American name, so I used it.

Thanks again for reading and leaving a comment! A second story along these lines is in the works... (Godzilla vs Mecha-godzilla like).

Posted by: Doug at November 30, 2006 12:37 PM

Nice post, the commets are perfect for the post.

Posted by: Buddha at July 29, 2007 5:41 PM

Thanks for your comments Buddha, (if that is your real name.) I'm glad you liked the story and the comments. It was a fun one. Thanks again.

Posted by: Doug at July 29, 2007 6:06 PM

Hey Doug,

Its my real name and i am from Kathmandu Nepal.

Thanks

Posted by: Buddha at August 22, 2007 8:06 AM

I am pleased that you returned! I have a friend of a friend whose father once was the mayor of Kathmandu... I hope all is well there with your governmental situation. Thanks again for visiting!

Posted by: Doug at August 26, 2007 6:02 PM

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