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Modular mice, experimental evolution, Bayesian enzymes, environmental extinction

Here are some papers that look interesting this week:

Discrete genetic modules are responsible for complex burrow evolution in Peromyscus mice
"In burrows built by first-generation backcross mice, entrance-tunnel length and the presence of an escape tunnel can be uncoupled... a classic 'extended phenotype' can evolve through multiple genetic changes each affecting distinct behaviour modules"

Tangled bank of experimentally evolved Burkholderia biofilms reflects selection during chronic infections
"We developed a biofilm model enabling long-term selection for daily adherence to and dispersal from a plastic bead in a test tube... experimental evolution may illuminate the ecology and selective dynamics of chronic infections and improve treatment strategies."

Navigating the protein fitness landscape with Gaussian processes
"sequence design algorithms motivated by Bayesian decision theory.... allowed us to engineer active P450 enzymes that are more thermostable than any previously made"

Evolution: A history of give and take
"deep-sea sediment cores show that environmental change correlates closely with extinction but not with speciation"

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